1

How do I remove last, the originally installed kernel?

Goal: I am trying to configure smallest possible linux server install (Debian 9) machine which will be running application server (PHP7) in a Nginx-PHP7-Database chain. My PHP7 app server(s) will run on blade server(s) living inside enclosure. Machines are 32cores+8GB ram, but diskless, with os booted from 2GB (ONLY 2GB!) pendrive.

What I have done so far:

  • Minimal install of Debian 9 (took 700MB), cmdline + sshd.
  • Compiled and tested custom kernel 4.9.65 for this machine, profiled to existing hardware and requirements.
  • Deployed custom kernel to the machine (as linux-image.*.deb package)
  • Successfully booted from pen-drive using custom kernel

Now I would like to remove original bloated kernel 4.9.0.4 which came with initial Debian 9 installation, which is now polluting my tiny pen-drive. I od not need to keep last-good kernel.

When I try to remove original, now unused kernel, it wants to upgrade it (to keep dependencies happy, I presume)

sudo apt-get purge linux-image-4.9.0-4-amd64

I get

The following packages will be REMOVED:
  linux-image-4.9.0-4-amd64*
The following NEW packages will be installed:
  linux-image-4.9.0-6-amd64

But I want to delete it, not upgrade.

Question: How do I remove original, LAST standard kernel? Is there any way to re-link package dependencies to my new custom kernel and free the original for deletion?

FYI: I cannot simply buy big pen-drives, as these are awfully slow under ext2 file system. The small ones I have are special 'enterprise' grade.

I could try some magic with generic image on iSCSI drive and overlayfs the pendrive to get personality. Not there yet, maybe in few months.

ANSWER: I let apt-get purge [...] install next version of kernel, which I was able to remove without further problems.

Clean, useful minimal server on Debian9 is 465MB, all packages kept.

  • Please add the answer to the answer section and accept it to preserve the format of the site. – Tero Kilkanen Mar 5 '18 at 23:33
0

The one of interesting things when you are working with packages is package holding. Hold - mark package in hold state which prevents it from changes (updates, removes).

Set hold:

sudo apt-mark hold <package-name>

Remove the hold:

sudo apt-mark unhold <package-name>
0

I let apt-get purge [...] install next version of kernel, which in turn I was able to remove without further problems.

Clean, useful minimal server on Debian9 is 465MB, all packages kept.

0

After the upgrade to the new kernel and a system reboot, run the following commands:

sudo apt-get autoremove -y
for kernelimage in $(dpkg -l | tail -n +6 | grep -E 'linux-image-[0-9]+' | grep -Fv $(uname -r) | awk '{print $2}'); do dpkg --purge $kernelimage; done

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.