0

Looking to find out if an Azure VM (Windows Server 2012 R2) has these 3 items below set as recommended here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/windows/sql/virtual-machines-windows-sql-performance

Enable read caching on the disk(s) hosting the data files and TempDB.

Stripe multiple Azure data disks to get increased IO throughput.

Format with documented allocation sizes.

Hints on how to check, please ? I have RDP access to this VM, local admin, but no access to the Azure account.

  • It's a VM, what makes you think you have a say in these matters? it's virtualised and can/will move around without your knowledge, the underlying hardware is entirely abstracted from you - to be fair the allocation sizes is part of the filesystem so you can fix that. – Chopper3 Mar 7 '18 at 17:08
  • 1
    The OP is probably talking about Azure disk's read/write cache, rather then physical disk caching. However, without access to the Azure console, it is not possible to check cache settings. – shodanshok Mar 7 '18 at 17:13
2

Enable read caching on the disk(s) hosting the data files and TempDB.

The only way you can check this by looking at the VM in the Azure portal, if you don't have access then you'll need to get someone to look. Go to the VM and then the disks tab, each disk will state what caching it is using.

enter image description here

Stripe multiple Azure data disks to get increased IO throughput.

Disk striping will be done from inside the OS, either in disk management or storage spaces. Look at the amount of disks configured in the Azure portal, then look at storage spaces or disk management to see how they are setup.

Format with documented allocation sizes.

Open an admin command prompt and run this command:

fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo <drive letter>

Look at the bytes per cluster value.

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • your are using write host caching? this sounds promising in terms of performance but I did not find any recommendation on that, did you!!? – Falco Alexander Mar 12 '18 at 14:31
  • 1
    I believe that is just the default in Azure for OS disks, I've not done any testing on it's performance. – Sam Cogan Mar 12 '18 at 14:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.