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I have a sls file for SaltStack which looks like this:

etckeeper:
  pkg.installed

etckeeper_extra_packages:
  pkg.installed:
    - pkgs:
      - hwinfo

{%- if not salt['file.directory_exists' ]('/etc/.git') %}
init_etckeeper:
  cmd.run:
    - name: etckeeper init
{%- endif %}

gitconfig_etckeeper_name:
  git.config_set:
    - name: user.name
    - value: Etckeeper running on {{grains.id}}
    - repo: /etc

gitconfig_etckeeper_mail:
  git.config_set:
    - name: user.email
    - value: root@{{grains.id}}
    - repo: /etc


{%- if not salt['file.directory_exists' ]('/etc/.git') %}
initial_commit_etckeeper:
  cmd.run:
    - name: etckeeper commit -m "initial commit"
{%- endif %}

I would like to make this fail on the first non successful state/command/... (of to call this?)

For example if pkg.installed of etckeeper fails, I don't want the hwinfo to get installed.

How to do this?

You can compare this question to set -e in the shell:

-e Exit immediately if a command exits with a non-zero status.

1

You can just require the first state in the second one:

etckeeper:
  pkg.installed

etckeeper_extra_packages:
  pkg.installed:
    - pkgs:
      - hwinfo
    - require:
      - pkg: etckeeper

It will not stop the whole execution. If you have some other states that can be applied without the package being installed, it will. That's requisites: https://docs.saltstack.com/en/latest/ref/states/requisites.html

If you absolutely want to stop the execution right now, you can use

etckeeper:
  pkg.installed:
    - failhard: True

That's the failhard global option: https://docs.saltstack.com/en/latest/ref/states/failhard.html. Don't abuse its use.

  • Yes, this would work. But imagine there are 20 requisites in my file. I would need to add "failhard" 20 times, or use "require" 20 times. I think that's bloat. Is there no easier solution? – guettli Apr 24 '18 at 12:35
  • Well, you could use the failhard master wide (see doc). Or you just let fail the states that requires other failed ones. If you care about requirements, you set them specifically. If not, you let them fail. – Christophe Drevet-Droguet Apr 24 '18 at 17:16

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