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I have a situation where a building was pre-wired for Ethernet (Cat-6, I believe). After some research, I believe if I wanted to run internet to all the cables that run to the rooms in the building, I would have to connect a router to the modem and then connect the Ethernet cables to the router (or to a switch if not enough ports on the router).

Unfortunately, the entry point of the cables is in the basement of a fairly solidly-built building and putting the wireless router there would drastically hurt any wireless signal to any other part of the building (I've already tested this).

I am wondering what is my next option for getting the signal to the entire building, and then running my wireless router off one of those ports? I have been reading up on this (with very little background in anything networking) and the only thing I can come up with is to purchase another router to feed from the modem to the rest of the building and then hook my other router where I'd like.

If this is the only option, how badly does this degrade my connection?

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    A professional network would use a wired router and switches, and then place WAPs in appropriate places in the building. The consumer-grade routers are not what you would use. You could use them as WAPs if you disable the routing, NAT, and firewall (use in bridge mode), but they were really designed for home use, not professional network implementations. – Ron Maupin Nov 20 '18 at 21:48
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If you have a working Ethernet in any of the rooms, you can pretty much add a switch there and then route traffic from there (connect wifi AP's to this switch etc.).

If not, then your only option would be to put a router (not wifi router) at the entry point (basement) which will give you the basic internet enabled Ethernet connection in rooms (wherever the other end of wire is). Then, connect a wifi AP to any of these internet enabled Ethernet in rooms which will enable wifi access to the floor (depending on how big the floor is).

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