14

Wikipedia says that the Tesla M60 has 2x8 GB RAM (whatever it means) and TDP 225–300 W.

I use an EC2 instance (g3s.xlarge) which is supposed to have a Tesla M60. But nvidia-smi command says it has 8GB ram and max power limit 150W:

> sudo nvidia-smi
Tue Mar 12 00:13:10 2019
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| NVIDIA-SMI 410.79       Driver Version: 410.79       CUDA Version: 10.0     |
|-------------------------------+----------------------+----------------------+
| GPU  Name        Persistence-M| Bus-Id        Disp.A | Volatile Uncorr. ECC |
| Fan  Temp  Perf  Pwr:Usage/Cap|         Memory-Usage | GPU-Util  Compute M. |
|===============================+======================+======================|
|   0  Tesla M60           On   | 00000000:00:1E.0 Off |                    0 |
| N/A   43C    P0    37W / 150W |   7373MiB /  7618MiB |      0%      Default |
+-------------------------------+----------------------+----------------------+

+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Processes:                                                       GPU Memory |
|  GPU       PID   Type   Process name                             Usage      |
|=============================================================================|
|    0      6779      C   python                                      7362MiB |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+

What does it mean? Do I get a 'half' of the card? Is the Tesla M60 actually two cards stuck together as the ram specification (2x8) suggests?

1 Answer 1

19

Yes, the Tesla M60 is two GPUs stuck together, and each g3s.xlarge or g3.4xlarge instance gets one of the two GPUs.

4
  • BTW, what does 's' stand for in 'g3s'? Other 'g3' machines don't have it.
    – hans
    Mar 12, 2019 at 15:46
  • @hans Probably something like "small". That instance type has far less CPU and RAM than the other instance types. Mar 12, 2019 at 15:47
  • 1
    @MichaelHampton How can it both be small and xlarge at the same time?
    – kasperd
    Mar 24, 2019 at 7:49
  • 1
    @kasperd You'll have to ask Amazon. I don't understand their naming conventions either. Mar 24, 2019 at 15:12

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .