3

On my (Dutch) Windows 10 Pro computer, NET USE /? show the following syntax:

NET USE
[devicename | *] [\\computername\sharename[\volume] [password | *]]
        [/USER:[domainname\]username]
        [/USER:[dotted domain name\]username]
        [/USER:[username@dotted domain name]
        [/SMARTCARD]
        [/SAVECRED]
        [/REQUIREINTEGRITY]
        [/REQUIREPRIVACY]
        [/WRITETHROUGH]
        [[/DELETE] | [/PERSISTENT:{YES | NO}]]

NET USE {devicename | *} [password | *] /HOME

NET USE [/PERSISTENT:{YES | NO}]

I have not seen /REQUIREINTEGRITY, /REQUIREPRIVACY nor /WRITETHROUGH before so I guess those are new switches. I searched but did not find any authoritative clue. What do they mean?

And why didn't Microsoft document NET USE recently?

6

I can't find reference as to when they were all added for use with net.exe, however

[/WRITETHROUGH] was added in windows 10 build 1809 - It allows you to map a drive with forced unit access ("write through") specified and bypass all OS caches, forcing the I/Os through to disk.

The other 2 I found referenced here and are related to UNC path hardening

From the link

The UNC Hardened Access feature enables specific servers or shares to be "tagged" with additional information to inform Multiple UNC Provide (MUP) and UNC providers of security requirements beyond the UNC provider’s defaults. In particular, the following three security properties are supported:

RequireIntegrity=<0|1> – When this property is set to 1, MUP and the selected UNC provider must use integrity checks in order detect when third parties manipulate requests or responses while in transit between the client and server in order to block tampering attacks.

RequirePrivacy=<0|1> – When this property is set to 1, MUP and the selected UNC provider must use a form of encryption in such a way that when third parties see communication between the client and the server, they cannot see any sensitive information that is contained within the communication.

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