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Networking refers to the technologies and techniques that enable the interconnection of devices and applications allowing them to communicate electronically.

136
votes
There is a "secret" keyboard shortcut to force an exit :~) From the frozen session, hit these keys in order: Enter~. The tilde (only after a newline) is recognized as an escape sequence by the ssh cli …
answered Jun 22 '11 by Caleb
1
vote
Saying one is better than the other without explaining why is very subjective. Basically using www is a subdomain of your domain name, and as such gives you an extra set of handles to work with when c …
answered Feb 24 '11 by Caleb
1
vote
I am going to hazard a guess that the bit you are missing setting the configuration in VirtualBox for the network adapter of your virtual machine to say "bridged" networking as opposed to "nat". You … might have some trouble accessing local area network things when set to nat networking because technically the guest os is in that case not part of the local network but is a node off of another node …
answered Oct 2 '10 by Caleb
0
votes
Duplicate IP's on the network? Circular route somewhere? Bad network card?
answered Apr 15 '11 by Caleb
11
votes
The packet loss is not necessary an indication of a problem. Remember those are attempts to communicate with that particular network node directly. Usually those in-between router nodes are only respo …
answered Apr 16 '11 by Caleb
4
votes
The file /etc/sysconfig/network typically contains general information about networking on the system. Should interfaces even be activated? Which ones? What is the primary interface? What is this …
answered Apr 15 '11 by Caleb
2
votes
There is no way to do range mapping like you are trying to do. You could write a 3 line script to generate the rules for you, but that would be a bad hack. I really think you are on the wrong track he …
answered Apr 14 '11 by Caleb
2
votes
This is almost certainly a network issue and not a problem with your Apache configuration. Port 80 traffic is probably being filtered or queued somewhere between you and the target system. Perhaps th …
answered May 7 '11 by Caleb
1
vote
You are connecting to the wrong part of the router. Routers by definition are two halves, a local side (Local area network) and a remote side (wide area network, upstream, uplink, etc). A router rout …
answered Apr 2 '11 by Caleb
1
vote
If you are asking about what performance hit you take by adding a virtualization layer, the answer is not very much in the grand scheme of things. If it makes your administration significantly easier, …
answered Apr 23 '11 by Caleb
0
votes
On most linux systems you can just modify /etc/resolv.conf directly. Since yours says it was generated by NetworkManager, perhaps you should look into either setting these options in NetworkManager (b …
answered Oct 2 '10 by Caleb
0
votes
Yes, setting up a bind (or other DNS) server is the right solution. Then your important services will have static names no matter where in the IP namespace they get assigned. Your network will need to …
answered Apr 13 '11 by Caleb
4
votes
Most of the terms you rattled off are names of interfaces created by vendor specific or software specific scenarios. Virtual networks, bridges, tunnels, etc. The terminology needed to setup kvm or ot …
answered Apr 23 '11 by Caleb
2
votes
I think the answer is that you would need to create a bonded interface using a failover configuration where whatever NIC work get's the connection. Then you can make your bridges on top of the bond in …
answered Apr 25 '11 by Caleb
1
vote
No, Amazon does not block multiple connections into EC2 from the same IP. The system functions just like any other TCP/IP v4 network and I can successfully open up hundreds of connections from one IP. …
answered Aug 16 '11 by Caleb