13

Writing a comprehensive tutorial on this might not be suitable for a Q/A site, but here's some advices. Also, this is from the perspective of managing the installation for a single client within their own intranet. For e.g. SaaS installations it's better to use global FQDNs & PKI. As a software vendor, you SHOULD NOT: implement own PKI and push it ...


10

Don't introduce root CAs into other organisations Using self-signed certificates and distributing them through Active Directory is possible, but fairly involved. Esa Jokinen goes into more detail in his answer. More important are the security implications; root certificates are like a master key, all certificates signed by a root certificate in AD will be ...


8

Don't mix AD, Hyper-V and File Server in one Windows Server instance. Just install Hyper-V on baremetal and deploy sepearte Windows VMs for AD and FileServer role. Virtual Switches allow you to segregate network interfaces for each role. Here is explanation regarding combining Hyper-V and AD role on the same server: https://www.hyper-v.io/combining-hyper-v-...


7

Technically you can configure AD and VPN on same Windows Server instance. But such configuration is against all known Microsoft and community best practises. In age of virtualisation it makes no sense to host different roles inside one server instance. If you have only one physical host - install Hyper-V role and run two VMs, Windows Server Standard ...


7

As here already mentioned, you can run Domain controller either on baremetal or as VM. I prefer VM, as it gives you more flexibility and as DC require “low” CPU and RAM you don’t waste hardware resources of modern servers. AD infrastructure should be redundant, and it means that at least two DC must be deployed on different hardware servers. Failover ...


6

This is normal. Knowing that a resource in a corporate environment exists is generally not a security problem. Don't try and "fix" this.


6

Doing this isn't worth the potential headache. I've been through this operation when it didn't work correctly and in the end wished I hadn't undertaken it. Is the name really so important? This seems a bit like tilting at windmills to me. You should have at least two domain controllers, whether that's one old one and one new one or two new ones. I wouldn't ...


6

it needs to change his DNS settings to that of the Domain Controller IP address This isn't actually correct. You need to have your client (the machine you want to join the domain) be using a DNS server (or servers) that knows all the records for the AD domain; that doesn't have to be a DC. In many environments, its really easy to simply make the Venn ...


5

If it were me, I'd reconfigure Drupal to be hosted on www.company.int.


5

You should read this piece of Microsoft documentation Certain policies only apply to domain controllers when they are linked at the root of the domain, this includes policies in the following nodes: Computer Configuration/Windows Settings/Security Settings/Account Policies Computer Configuration/Windows Settings/Security Settings/Local Policies/Security ...


5

Great to hear you managed to get the server working again. I really recommend resetting the Directory Services Recovery Mode (DSRM) password now that the server is alive, so you have it if something similar would ever happen again. Then store the password in a secure place or in a password manager you can reach even if the domain is unavailable. To reset ...


4

Given the following documented requirements for installing a 2019 Domain Controller in an environment: Domain Functional Level minimum of 2008 DFSR-based SYSVOL Replication The basic process would be: Install at least one (likely two) Domain Controller(s) running either 2008, 2008 R2, or 2012. If I recall correctly, a DC running 2012 R2 will not work ...


4

The key difference is that a Security Identifier (SID) is immutable, whereas both SAM Account Name (CONTOSO\USERNAME) and User Principal Name (UPN, username@contoso.com) can be changed. In a Windows Active Directory domain a user might have permissions to resources across many servers and workstations. If all those permissions were bound to usernames, ...


3

have a different NETBIOS name that does not match the domain name. That doesn't really bother me but it's something you have to think of. Not at all, when creating a domain, you are definitely able to specify the NetBIOS name of the domain. The default UPN suffix when creating users in ADUC is @ad.company.com. The user's UPN suffix should match their ...


3

Old question, but the answers are not particularly accurate. Windows doesn't especially care whether your computer is domain joined or not. The domain join in this stage of authentication is really just a hint to tell the client what domain it maybe should try contacting if enough information isn't present. The way Kerberos auth works is it takes a look at ...


3

You can't really deleted the default domain policy: you only unlinked it from the domain. The fix is very simple: open the group policy management console right-click on your domain select "link an existing GPO" select the right policy and click "OK"


3

Domain controllers have several built-in security settings which makes applying GPOs to them somewhat complex, especially when those GPOs are trying to manage security settings. You should have a look at the "Default Domain Controllers Policy" which is linked to the "Domain Controllers" OU; this is likely conflicting with your GPO. As a side note, you ...


3

Remind them of the shortcut to turn on Navigator, Windows + Ctrl + Enter. Also show them now to navigate Settings > Ease of Access > Navigator. This will help them on any Windows 10 machine they are using, joined to your domain or not. If you implement user experience virtualization, Ease of Access settings are synchronized by default. A bigger project, ...


3

Here's how I eventually got the hard-core non-updating windows 10 machines back to normal. Restart Log in as a local administrator Stop Windows Update and Background Intelligent Transfer services Clear out c:\windows\softwaredistribution\ Clear out c:\windows\system32\grouppolicy gpupdate /force Restart In SOME cases, the Windows 10 Update Assistant would ...


3

Yes, you should have two Domain Controllers. If your one Domain Controller goes down users will be unable to log in to the domain, access resources in the domain, won't have access to their Exchange mailbox, etc. If your one Domain Controller dies and is unrecoverable you will essentially lose your domain... which will necessitate recovering data, ...


3

Samba is Windows servers and clients for UNIX. Provides SMB file and print services, domain controller functions. And Winbind, an emulation of a Windows client for ID and auth. SSSD is an authentication stack for Linux that knows LDAP, Kerberos, and Active Directory. Either can provide names to NSS, and auth via PAM. Only Samba does the file and print SMB ...


3

As stated in your post your domain is probably in the Windows Server 2016 Domain Functional Level. However your Forest functional level might be lower. Verify your domain functional level via PowerShell: (Get-ADDomain).DomainMode Verify your forestfunctional level via PowerShell: (Get-ADForest).ForestMode Beware before upgrading your domain or forest ...


3

Leave the Active Directory Domain, rename your Fedora and then join back. This way you will make sure the new domain entry will be correct and intact.


3

Stumbled across your post looking for the same information. I think it's as below but yet to test. Under Synchronisation Service Manager > Connectors select your domain connector > Properties. Under "Connect to Active Directory Forest" you have an options button, untick "Sign & Encrypt LDAP traffic" and select "Enable SSL for the Connection".


3

Because the remote office is a branch of the same organization, a more efficient solution for that scenario is setting up a separate site describing the remote branch network and deploying a read-only domain controller there, with appropriate password replication policies. In addition, you should deploy at least two domain controllers in the forest. By ...


3

To directly answer your question of why the third method does not work: There is no attribute by the name Initials,Info which is why the cmdlet fails. Your input (a string with a comma) is not the same as an array of strings. The docmentation for the cmdlet Set-AdUser indicates that the -Clear attributes accepts an array of strings (or a single string, ...


3

String manipulation is your friend. Assuming: $dn = "CN=ComputerName,OU=OU1,OU=OU2,OU=OU3,DC=domain,DC=org" Then: $OU = $dn.Split(',')[1].Split('=')[1] What this does: Split the "dn" string at each ',' Take the second element ("OU=OU1") Split this at each '=' Take the second element Assign the result to the variable '$OU' At the end, the variable $...


3

You need to disable the AD synchronization before deleting that bad account, Step 1 – Install the Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell Install-Module -Name MSOnline Install-Module -Name AzureAD Step 2 – Connect to Azure AD Connect-MsolService Step 3 – Disable Directory Synchronization Set-MsolDirSyncEnabled –EnableDirSync $false Step ...


3

You're mixing a few things together that aren't really directly related. If all of your domain joined clients are in the 10.190.8.0/21 network then just add that to ADS&S. If at some point you subnet the 10.190.8.0/21 network into /24 subnets and you deploy Domain Controllers in those subnets then you can reconfigure ADS&S accordingly. That being ...


3

You can't join a Domain Controller to a different Active Directory domain. The whole Raison d'être of a DC is managing a domain, it's simply not possible to remove it from the domain it manages and/or join it to a different one. This is so critical for a DC that if AD services can't start properly, the server will simply blue screen. In order to be able to ...


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