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Option 4 - stop controlling the access through Security Groups and instead implement some decent authentication mechanism. For example put an Application Load Balancer in front of the web app and configure the ALB to require Cognito authentication. Only authenticated users will make it through the ALB to your web app - problem solved. The Cognito can have ...


6

Option 5 - stop managing Security Groups (essentially IP-based firewalls) and use TLS Client Certificates. If you're using modern user management systems like Azure AD or LDAP, you already have the right tool to issue and distribute the certificates. You'll setup a private CA and configure the HTTP server (Nginx, Apache2 or AWS ALB) to authenticate by ...


3

The AWS page literally does say what to choose. Bold text highlighted by me. When you launch your initial instances, we recommend that you accept the default Availability Zone, because this allows us to select the best Availability Zone for you based on system health and available capacity. If you launch additional instances, specify a Zone only if your new ...


2

It generally doesn't matter which availability zone you choose. Performance and price is the same in each AZ in a region. In some regions some specialty instance types aren't available in every AZ, but that's rare. AZs let you deploy highly available applications. This is something you could consider as your knowledge of AWS improves. Also make sure you set ...


1

The quickstart document you linked to clearly says: Two Kubernetes clusters are deployed into your AWS account, one running Rancher Server and the other ready for experimentation deployments. You can find Kubernetes clusters in your AWS console by going to Elastic Kubernetes Service, and then clicking Clusters.


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