19

You need a NAT. This configuration is commonly used to support private subnets in VPC, there's quite a detailed guide here. Once your VPC is configured to use the NAT instance all the outbound traffic will be attributed to the EIP of the NAT instance. If so, does that instance need to be solely for this purpose or can it be one of the instances that's ...


16

You can think of AWS Elastic Beanstalk as being a sort of automated version of EC2--that is, it uses EC2 on the backend for the servers, but you don't have to worry about manually provisioning servers, expanding servers when you hit capacity, and so on. Basically, you give Beanstalk your application and it will "scale" it for you. In fact, you aren't ...


13

I understand this is an old thread - for someone who has a similar use-case now, AWS nat-gateway would be a better solution.


10

CNAME resource records specify a domain as an alias of another canonical domain name. As such, it cannot point to an IP address. A and AAAA records define the canonical name and point to IP addresses. CNAMEs must reference those. Create an A record for allehotelsinparijs.nl that points to 79.125.111.73. Then create a CNAME record for www.allehotelsinparijs....


9

Classic EC2 instances can only have a single Elastic IP address associated with them. To get multiple IP addresses, you must use VPC and setup multiple network interfaces on your instance. NOTE: sometime between 2012 and 2014 AWS changed so that a single ENI can have multiple EIPs assigned to it. This answer, and the question, are no longer relevant as a ...


9

You can use Elastic Beanstalk along with a VPC for your scenario. Use a VPC with public and private subnets. Add a NAT to a public subnet and give it an Elastic IP address. Ensure all traffic from the private subnets goes through your NAT. Create your Elastic Beanstalk application, placing the ELB in a public subnet and the EC2 instances in one or more ...


9

When using the environment type "Single instance", you always get an EIP. From Beanstalk developer guide, Environment Types: A single-instance environment contains one Amazon EC2 instance with an Elastic IP address. Disabling the "Associate Public IP Address" option does not have any effect. Switch to "Load-balancing, Autoscaling" Environment to get by ...


8

This is indeed possible by means of AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), which enables you to securely control access to AWS services and resources for your users (facilitating IAM instead of the main account credentials for everyday AWS usage is nowadays highly recommended accordingly). Amongst several others, IAM enables the following use case: ...


8

That is currently not possible and actually a limitation of the Elastic Load Balancing (ELB) in use, see e.g. Why does Amazon not allow assigning an Elastic IP to an Elastic Load Balancer?: The elastic load balancer is simply a collection of individual software load balancers hosted within EC2, with DNS load balancing traffic among them. The pool can ...


7

The accepted answer is no longer true. In general you should use the ELB. However you may find a rare need that the ELB can't fulfil and you'd prefer to use keepalived even though it goes against best practice. Keepalived & VRRP works within an Amazon VPC. It does not work with ec2-classic. With keepalived you use the notify or notify_master ...


7

I'm afraid that as soon as you go out to the Public IPs you no longer can use the Security Group ID as the Source in the target SG. That only works for Private IPs. However if you create the Instance 1 through Ansible you can then use the Ansible facts for the instance to obtain its Public IP and set it as a source in the Instance 2 SG. Something like this ...


6

If you stop an instance in EC2, then any associated Elastic IPs are disassociated, and you must reassociate them yourself. However, the same doesn't apply to instances in VPC; in this case the Elastic IP remains associated, even when the instance is stopped. See the Elastic IP Address documentation for further details.


6

Three possibilities: Your VPC route table for the subnet is missing an entry pointing 0.0.0.0/0 to the IGW Your instance was launched into the default or wrong security group that is missing the incoming ssh rule You have a NACL on the subnet that is blocking the traffic


6

There is currently only one way to associate static IP addresses with Application Load Balancer (ALB) -- AWS Global Accelerator. Static Anycast IPs – Global Accelerator uses Static IP addresses that serve as a fixed entry point to your applications hosted in any number of AWS Regions. These IP addresses are Anycast from AWS edge locations, meaning that ...


6

From the Elastic IP Addresses section in the EC2 documentation: An Elastic IP address is for use in a specific region only.


6

Note that the address block assigned to your organisation must be Provider Independent or similarly portable allocation. It's not very common for even mid-size companies to have such addresses! If your network is connected to multiple upstream ISPs, you've got an AS number and do BGP routing chances are you've got a portable address block. If you don't know ...


5

It's not a shared IP, it's a 'personal' IP. You are the only one that has access to it.


5

Amazon will happily lift this limit for you. In my experience, this only takes a few hours to go through. Correct, you should never use an EIP for internal EC2-to-EC2 traffic. Not if you use VPC (which you absolutely should if you're ever going to use more than a single standalone server). This also helps with point #2, as the internal IPs stay static ...


5

Is there a way to assign the public elastic IP address directly to the eth0 interface? No, there is not. Internet traffic to/from EC2 instances always traverse the Elastic IP 1:1 NAT infrastructure. If not, does anyone know a work around to using Vyatta in a VPC configured with an ipsec VPN? I have all manner of IPsec operating in VPC (including ...


5

Yes there is! Embrace the power of DNS eventual consistency. Set up an ELB, point it at your instance. Update the A record for your public instance with a CNAME for the ELB. Wait a week. Associate an Elastic-IP with the instance. Update the CNAME record for your app with a new A record for the EIP. Wait a week. Turn off the ELB. For the two weeks of ...


4

In the end, I implemented the requirement of our partner as follows: launch an instance in AWS allocate and attach an Elastic IP (EIP) to it Installed Apache (in our case, installed our SSL certificate) Configured Apache as a reverse proxy server, forwarding to a CNAME that pointed to our ELB Here's a sample Apache virtual host configuration. I turned off ...


4

No, it is not possible. Elastic IPs are tied to your account, not to individual instances, so the instance's interface IP will always be private. EC2 Private IP Address: The internal RFC 1918 address of an instance that is only routable within the EC2 Cloud. Network traffic originating outside the EC2 network cannot route to this IP, and must use the Public ...


4

I don't have enough reputation to comment on the above answers, but I wanted to add some information you will need to know if using a NAT gateway to achieve this. When you create a NAT gateway, you select a subnet and an elastic IP address. At first, I just added the NAT gateway to the same subnet that my elastic load balancer and EC2 instances were on. ...


4

This is by design. You will need to re-associate the EIP when starting your instance.


4

The Elastic IP limitation per account is 5. That's just the default allocation. You can request more via support. It's highly unlikely that you need more than a single IP, though. Name-based virtual hosting is the way you should go. The only reason you'd need multiple IP addresses was if your sites: Needed to support TLS. AND Need to be consumed by ...


4

As mentioned in comments, ELBs do not use Elastic IP addresses (EIP). Further, the instances behind ELB do not typically need public IP addresses -- inbound, they're accessed through the ELB (which receives their reply traffic also, forwarding replies to the requester) and outbound -- for back-end service requests, the instances can use a NAT instance for ...


4

You can't allocated a VPC EIP with an EC2-classic instance. I suspect Elastic IPs are allocated in VPC by default. I suggest you allocate a new EIP you look for options about where it's created and make sure it says "EC2 Classic". I don't have access to EC2-classic as my account is too new. Amazon has documentation on this topic here. This page has some ...


4

It looks like the requirement is to provide bastion functionality at lowest reasonable cost with an RTO of say 5 minutes. No RPO is applicable as it's effectively a stateless proxy that can be rebuilt easily. I'd have a bastion host, defined either as an AMI or CloudFormation script (AMI is faster), inside an autoscaling group with min/max/target set to 1. ...


4

In order to efficiently use a NAT gateway/instance, your EC2 instances should be in private subnets. This way, you simply have a default route for all outbound traffic to go through the NAT. Move your EC2 instances from your public subnets to private subnets. Your load balancer will still be able to access them since the ELB resides inside your VPC. Also, ...


3

When you reboot an EC2 instance, nothing changes with the IP addresses, so your question as currently phrased is invalid. Perhaps you are talking about stopping and starting an EBS boot instance which had an Elastic IP address associated with it? If you have a non-VPC EC2 instance with an Elastic IP address associated with it, and you stop that instance, ...


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