25

I wouldn't consider it a good practice. When most people usually set up things like "nightly iisresets" or "nightly reboots," generally, it's because they are running an application that is poorly-written and leaks resources, to the point where the entire system may become unstable unless we restart the application, the service, or even entire system. The ...


16

64-bit memory pointers and other related data structures are twice as large as their 32-bit counterparts. In addition, a 64-bit worker thread will incur a penalty every time it has to access 32-bit code or DLLs as it switches modes. (Research WoW64 and thunking.) The biggest (but not the only) advantage of using 64 bits is the ability to address much more ...


12

The only overhead incurred will be the few bytes taken up in applicationHost.config to define the Application Pools and any non-default settings they may have. If you have a 1000 unused app pools it might improve the time it takes to apply on-the-fly configuration changes to IIS (since there's less XML for the WAS service to parse), but with 5 App Pools I ...


12

Yes! (As long as you're using IIS 7.0+) You need to set the loadUserProfile setting for the Application Pool Identity to true. The Application Pool Identity will now have a user profile under \Users\[Application Pool Name]. You can then edit this profile to have custom environment variables, etc. IIS 7 Tip # 3 You can now load the user profile of the ...


8

You don't. You can confer permissions to local resources for the IIS APPPOOL{app pool name} identity for local resources per: How to assign permissions to ApplicationPoolIdentity account In Active Directory, the identity needs to be either a Well-Known security principal, an actual user/group/computer security principal, or a foreign/trusted security ...


8

Yes, totally outdated, in fact it was never ever required or good practice. If you had to do this there was something wrong with your application. Recycling application pools is a much cheaper operation as it just shuts down one process and starts another one. Iisreset restarts the whole IIS with all its components. AppPool recycling also gives you much ...


7

I have answered a similar on StackOverflow. Microsoft moved the warmup feature to IIS 8, but they have also released the Application Initialization Module for IIS 7.5 as a separate download. The feature I think is most compelling is that this module also enables overlapped process recycling. The following tutorial from IIS 8.0 include a step-by-step ...


6

This is probably safer and simpler than editing applicationHost.config. Powershell PS C:\Windows\system32> import-module WebAdministration PS C:\Windows\system32> iis: PS IIS:\> cd .\AppPools PS IIS:\AppPools> ls PS IIS:\AppPools> del [name of phantom AppPool]


6

When using anonymous authentication by default IIS uses a specific user named IUSR to access files. This user is automatically a member of the Windows Users but not a member of IIS_IUSRS If you removed permissions for Users from your files, the default site setup wont work anymore. I usually don't use IUSR, to change this in the GUI, select the server or ...


5

Not necessarily a problem. That virtual memory profile is what we see for the same architecture and physical memory usage. If it were to escalate indefinitely, that would be bad and it would eventually terminate, although the operating system limit is quite high. If a large virtual memory allocation were performed, and the system did not have a large ...


5

IIS 7.x has a built-in worker process view, including (per w3wp process): Application Pool Name. Process ID. State. CPU %. Private Bytes (KB). Virtual Bytes (KB). To access this view, simply: Open up the IIS Manager (inetmgr) Select the Web Server in the left pane Double-click the "Worker Processes" feature icon in the center pane Voila: Technet ...


5

According to Scott Forsyth's blog, this is a limit set by the Windows licensing team. Below is the information from his blog: Windows Vista – IIS 7 Concurrent Requests Limit | 3 | Home Basic (IIS process activation and HTTP processing only) | 3 | Home Premium | 10 | Ultimate, Professional, Enterprise Windows 7 – IIS 7.5 Concurrent Requests Limit | 1 | ...


4

You should really be creating groups per "role" and assigning that group accesses on the filesystem. Then add the app pool to the role-specific groups as necessary. This way even if you remove the app pool later (and the virtual user goes poof), you dont have to worry about redoing all the permissions, you just add the replacement app pool to the existing ...


4

Every Application Pool is (normally) associated with one worker process named w3wp.exe If the application pool becomes unresponsive, you can kill it. It doesn't affect any of the other application pools or IIS over all. All sites using that application pool will be affected, but they may be already. The application pool may start up again automatically, ...


4

No, your update will not cause the application pool to reset. Modifying the specific times that an application pool recycles will not cause the application pool to immediately recycle. You can verify this for yourself if you like by running perfmon and capturing the "Total Application Pool Recycles" counter of the "APP_POOL_WAS" object while you modify the ...


4

Event viewer / Custom views / Server Roles / Web Server (IIS)


4

Yes, stopping an AppPool (rather than killing its process) does also gracefully shut down the ApplicationPool, giving existing requests time to finish. So the behavior is the same as for recycling the pool.


3

From command line run as administrator in %windir%\system32\inetsrv appcmd list wp This will show you the processid associated with each site that you can compare with the task manager.


3

The correct syntax can be found on IIS.NET site. To change the queue length you would have to enter: appcmd.exe set APPPOOL "DefaultAppPool" /add.queueLength:10000 in your case: appcmd.exe set APPPOOL "MSExchangeServicesAppPool" /add.queueLength:10000 You can list the current configuration settings with: appcmd.exe list APPPOOL "...


3

After reading @Scott Forsyth - MVP answer I tried to restart the Application Host Helper Service. That solved the problem for me.


3

It really depends on what changes you're making. If you're just updating a config file then often you don't even need to recycle the app pool, let alone stopping and starting it. Whereas if you've changed some asp.net stuff, then recycling the app pool is usually required, but once again, a stop and start is not usually required. Here is a good explanation ...


3

You don't have to recycle or re-start your application pool when you update your site. Neither for adding/updating files nor for updating your web.config. IIS picks up all changes automatically. Reasons for why you may want to recycle include: The application pool hangs and no longer serves requests. The application pool uses too much memory or your app ...


3

This is usually an ASP.NET code issue. From what I'm finding online, that specific code (0x80070057) refers to an invalid parameter. You might want to set up a crash rule with the Debug Diagnostics tool. That's probably your best bet for finding what's causing the crashes. Good luck!


3

Sorry to say, I think the only appropriate answer is "It depends" - and once you start digging into what "it depends" on, you'll find that you have to benchmark your current site, with good metrics. Then build each scenario you want to test, with a synthetic load that is as close to a busy day on your production site, and monitor the same metrics. Both from ...


3

From what I can see, an application pool with no web sites, does not create a worker process This is a true statement. See this for reference. (IIS 6, but it applies to 7 and above) My thoughts are this... It isn't hurting anything with such a small number of unused app pools to just leave them, and you never know when you might need to change a website's ...


3

I would like to offer an alternative view on this. Whilst I agree that you shouldn't do it because you are trying to solve an issue such as resource leaks, we randomly destroy machines during office hours. The idea being that we ensure our automatic disaster recovery plan works and if it doesn't it fails during the day when we have most of our staff in. ...


3

If you look at the default permission for C:\inetpub\wwwroot: BUILTIN\IIS_IUSRS:(RX) BUILTIN\IIS_IUSRS:(OI)(CI)(IO)(GR,GE) NT SERVICE\TrustedInstaller:(I)(F) NT SERVICE\TrustedInstaller:(I)(OI)(CI)(IO)(F) NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM:(I)(F) NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM:(I)(OI)(CI)(IO)(F) BUILTIN\Administrators:(I)(F) BUILTIN\Administrators:(I)(OI)(CI)(IO)(F) BUILTIN\Users:(I)...


2

We have the same issue on several servers. If I reset the times they will only single recycle until the date changes, then it starts with the duplicates again. Microsoft told us this was because of time drift on the VM servers.


2

I had the same situation as you described at IIS forum: one web site, several application pools, several pairs of Applications (web-service) and Virtual directories (html + js), automated deployment and so on. The problem was the same: when I added/removed virtual directory, all applications restarted. This was not good as I planned to serve multiple ...


2

I have found the reason why you might experience the following error when using Integrated Security for an MSSSQL Server connection string, despite the setting the application pool identity to be a user account that is able to login and have Pass Through authentication enabled in the Basic Settings of the web site: Microsoft SQL Server Native Client 10.0 ...


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