40

What you describe is essential a geographically distributed RAID and a RAID was never a backup. Online sync usually means everything you do on the primary storage gets immediately replicated to the backup system, including operations like the deletion of (all) snapshots and/or volumes by an attacker or simply an admin error.


33

From the documentation: A backup creates an archive file that contains the database, all repositories and all attachments. This archive will be saved in backup_path (see config/gitlab.yml). The filename will be [TIMESTAMP]_gitlab_backup.tar. This timestamp can be used to restore an specific backup. sudo gitlab-rake gitlab:backup:create


20

You can periodically run crontab -l > my_crontab.backup to backup the crontab into file.


12

For production use, the best approach is to have a testing environment where you can test any changes before applying them into production. Having this as a VM of course helps with snapshots and rollbacks. Another approach is the use of modern file systems like ZFS that also allow to do snapshots or even LVM.


11

Depending on what backup solution you are using the terms are fairly Synonyms Bare-metal Can also be a full backup with system state. Incremental or Differential. Depending on preference and space you can use either. Incremental backup all changes from last Incremental backup Differential backup add changes from last Full backup For a DR situation you ...


8

I know this is quite an old question, but googling took me there. On ubuntu 14.04 I have a following line in /etc/sources.list.d/mongo.list to have the 3.2 version there: deb http://repo.mongodb.org/apt/ubuntu trusty/mongodb-org/3.2 multiverse The source contains few packages. According to the MongoDB Manual it's like this: mongodb-org - A metapackage ...


7

It sounds like it might be worth it to perform a System State restore of a DC contemporaneous to the Exchange backups, find the user object, and examine the homeMDB attribute. That's going to give you the mailbox database name for sure, but you'll have to deal with putting up a DC "under glass" (don't connect it to your network at all after you perform the ...


7

According to Microsoft, you can sysprep a Windows 2012 server running RDS. Since you already have a backup of a functioning server, you can: Restore that backup. Disconnect the network cable. Boot the server. Make sure you have a functional local administrator account. Run c:\windows\system32\sysprep.exe and pick OOBE. You don't need Generalize unless the ...


7

The 30-day rollback is a great capability, but what if "critically-important-file-xyz" became corrupt/damaged and this was not detected until 31+ days later? This situation is the difference between back-up and archival schedules, but in your description the latter is not mentioned. Archival systems are usually stored on very low cost tape. Also no ...


7

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/administration/windows-commands/robocopy /xo Excludes older files. That’s what you need.


6

Having geographically separated machines both having the data is good. What happens when you have multiple failures involving both or all your sites? A fire at one, theft of the servers at the other? Or there is a problem with the line between them, then the primary location's server goes out, and the HD controller goes ape and writes junk? Or some insider ...


6

You can't export data directly from Glacier to a disk. S3 Glacier Storage Class If your data was in S3, moved to the Glacier storage class, you initiate a retrieval request from Glacier to S3. You then use Import/Export or Snowball to export on a drive. Once it's in S3 you can use any of the S3 tools available to download the files. If you have a 100Mbps ...


6

This is best done with in a virtual machine such as VMware or VirtualBox, rather than on physical hardware. Take a snapshot of your virtual machine prior to making any changes, then it's a trivial matter of reverting to your snapshot should you need to revert to your previous state.


5

Not quite the answer that you're looking for, but the name of the backup file can be found in a combination the backup* tables in msdb. Your restore process could query the production msdb, figure out the backup file name, and go from there. Aside from that, there's always powershell which gives you the perfect blend of file system and database access.


5

First of all, if you restored a database using a full database backup, but specified a new name for the new database, the drop down menu in the Restore Database dialog in SSMS will show the name from the original backup, not the new name you specified Another situation when a database is not shown in the drop down menu in the Restore Database dialog is ...


4

For those installing on Amazon Ubuntu on EC2 using the 10gen yum repository for MongoDB, I had to sudo yum install mongo-10gen.x86_64 to get mongo, mongodump, mongorestore and mongos. Don't forget you can always sudo yum search mongo...


4

That looks like a 1/4" QIC minicartridge. This particular form factor was apparently common in desktop computers. Look for a QIC tape reader which was pulled out of somebody's desktop machine, and you may get lucky. I see several of them on eBay under $20.


4

Not as a backup (natively). I know of three options to get an MSSQL2008 database into MSSQL2005, though. 1) Third-party software. The DBAs here love Redgate. 2) Scripts. An example of which can be found here, and is [mostly] included below. Run the Generate SQL Server Scripts wizard in SQL Server Management Studio by right clicking on the database and ...


4

Amazon has a pretty good walk-through for setting up the Command Line tools. Those can be run from anything with visibility to the web, so could be an instance, could be a VPS hosted at GoGrid, or your laptop. Doesn't matter. Download and install the Amazon EC2 API Tools, which are java-based and can run with both Linux or Windows. Set up your API key. ...


4

It sounds like you are looking for instructions on how to use the Recovery Storage Group. This article describes the new Recovery Store Group feature in Exchange Server 2003. By using the Recovery Storage Group feature, you can mount a second copy of an Exchange mailbox store (database) on the same computer as the original mailbox store, or on any ...


4

I just had to handle this. Finding the backup In my case, mysql lives in /usr/local/mysql/ (where the last part is actually a symlink to the current installed version of mysql). It actually does correctly back up the files, and the whole structure exists on the backup. But for some reason, even if you navigate to the correct local path in finder, if you ...


4

First of all, a backup isn't a backup if it's in the same machine that you're backing up. You should be backing up to another server or external media (tape, disk, whatever) and keeping it offsite. Right now you have two problems: You're not using RAID. You're correct that RAID isn't a backup. RAID is for availability during hardware (disk) failures. If ...


4

Unless otherwise specified The tar utility will extract files into the original tree within the current directory so for example in you are in /home/antonio/recovery and you issues the command tar xvpfz backup.tgz the files would be recovered into /home/antonio/recovery... If you use the -C option this tells tar to change directory and to extract the ...


4

It turns out that the solutions is as simple as specifying a larger timeout. It does matter which timeout though (there are several timeout switches for SqlPackage.exe and it's neither the connection timeout specifiable in a connection string), it's CommandTimeout. The below modified command won't fail even with a bacpac containing a large number of tables (...


4

It seems that the .difftar files were compressed after all. Restoring worked after renaming them to .difftar.gz. Must be a bug in duplicity.


4

The question here seems to be about just how disconnected and geographically distinct a replicated copy of your data needs to be before it's a backup and not high availability/redundancy infrastructure. My gut is that you're close, but still need a backup. To bring together (cherry-pick) some thoughts in the other answers and comments, you can go really far ...


4

You test your backups primarily to test your restore procedures so that when you're in crisis situation you'll know exactly what to do and when everybody will be panicking you'll be competent, confident, calm and will know exactly what to do and roughly how long the restore will take etc. etc. because by then restoring backups is a routine event. The second ...


4

If you made a snapshot of your instance, you can create new volume from that snapshot, detach the current volume from your instance and attached the one restored from a snapshot. There are also plenty of backup tools, which could serve the purpose. It is a good practice to backup your instances, data etc etc, if you haven't done so, you will not be able ...


4

Use Windows Server Backup to back up the files/disk to an external USB drive. Then restore them.


4

Chkdsk utility must help in order to restore the NTFS partition -> chkdsk X: (drive letter) /f /r If the diskpart already identify partition as RAW, you can use EaseUS to restore the partition and the NTFS should be available.


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