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47

One rare possibility could be you triggered some of the infamous UEFI bugs, that already killed some series of Samsung and Lenovo notebooks. It works like this: UEFI specs propose a non volatile memory (nvram or eeprom) that can be accessed by the OS to store settings or debugging information. Linux actually uses this feature in case of a kernel panic: If ...


27

No, it is not possible to destroy the BIOS (legacy or UEFI) in this manner with that command. Even if you somewhat managed to destroy the UEFI partition, core BIOS files will not be affected, as they reside in non-volatile memory (flash-based, mostly) socketed on your motherboard. UEFI partition hosts additional software components (eg: debugger, driver, ...


15

The first problem that you write in UNIX style. But the UEFI uses DOS style. So your sequence of commands: map mount blk0 aaa aaa: // !!! change disk in dos stile cd EFI\debian // use backslashes grubx64.efi // run bootloader without "./" The second problem - you have nothing written about the disk partitioning system. You can`t use ...


14

Fantastic. I had this problem with a Fedora 22 Live image on an USB stick created as per UEFI boot of USB sticks using livecd-iso-to-disk --efi --format --reset-mbr Fedora-Live-Xfce-x86_64-22-3.iso /dev/sdX Which gives a bootable GPT-organized disk with a VFAT partition. Then I tried to myy a ZOTAC Nano CI320 using that stick and found myself in a EFI ...


14

This turned out to be a very interesting question. There are lots of links out there on this topic but they are ambiguous in describing the difference/relationship between the two. Best description I've found of the hard drive configuration for a Windows OS is this one: http://www.ntfs.com/hard-disk-basics.htm. It appears that MBR and Partition Table are ...


13

Interesting question... In general, I base the system performance profile on the application and intended use of the server. I typically work with: Low-latency transaction-heavy systems. Virtualization hosts (VMware). Linux-based ERP servers. The systems that require deterministic performance and low-latency are typically set to a high-performance ...


10

The following Dell Whitepaper goes in depth on the differences between the different power profiles: http://en.community.dell.com/techcenter/extras/m/white_papers/20248740 (page 20-36) Below you can find some relevant pieces of information mentioned in the whitepaper: Each profile simply enables/disables some BIOS features, the table below provides an ...


10

While fun, rm -rf / can only break a havoc inside its own little jail -- and that is the partition(s) it is given. It cannot mess up disk MBR, nor it cannot magically destroy your computer. Something else is wrong in your case.


9

I don't know how the USB controller ended up disabled on your system... I'd love to know what happened right before you asked this question... But you do have a couple of options to recover. Since there's no PS/2 port on this line of servers, I guess keyboard input doesn't work. Is there an OS loaded already? Are you suuuure that your keyboard/KVM switch is ...


8

FYI: I got through it ok. In my setup, I installed GRUB on both /dev/sda and /dev/sdb, and it worked swimmingly.


8

The other answers seem to agree that wiping the BIOS is probably not your problem, so here's another thought: My computer, when switched into UEFI mode, skips the BIOS screen completely. No manufacturer's logo, no nothing. It just tries to boot and tells me there's no bootable media (or boots). If I remember the key to enter setup, I can whack it as the ...


8

You have mixed registered and unregistered. That won't work. All the ram needs to be registered or unregistered.


7

Use kexec to reboot your server. This skips the pre-boot procedures entirely, and reboots into a Linux kernel at the end of the Linux shutdown process, rather than resetting the hardware and going to POST. Unfortunately kexec is a bit cumbersome to use, so I wrote a script to make it easier to work with: kexec-reboot will allow you to choose a kernel from ...


7

There's a special firmware update needed to allow the use of E5-2600V2 CPUs in systems originally equipped with V1 CPUs. You need to download it to a USB key and boot the server from it in order to upgrade your platform.


7

Well, the first obvious difference is that noht doesn't actually do anything on modern Linux systems. This kernel boot option is long obsolete, and was replaced with maxcpus=. Setting maxcpus=m, where m is the number of physical (non-HT) cores, now accomplishes the same thing. It's also possible to enable or disable individual CPU cores/hyperthreads via ...


6

Make sure to unplug any USB/external drives. They can cause the server to hang at boot in many instances.


6

Use a supported PCIe SSD. Your problem is likely due to the hardware not addressing the PCIe x2 interface correctly. To verify the situation, look in the Rom-Based Setup Utility (RBSU - press F9) bios screen and see if the card is detected. If it does show up, then your issue is at the OS level. Update your server firmware if you haven't already, just to ...


6

The firmware for that server is located on HP's website. Here's where to get it. Don't assume that a system this old has any recent firmware updates. Here's your BIOS download. Here's your ILO download. Here's your RAID controller download.


5

Risky upgrade... Remove power from the server. Unplug the cables. Let the machine sit for a few minutes. Plug the cables back in and power on. If this doesn't work, you'll want to reset NVRAM. Take a look at the HP ProLiant DL360p Gen8 Server Maintenance and Service Guide You have to clear the CPU errors... Try the sequence detailed here. If you have ...


5

I'd trash the server. The G5 ProLiants are on the wrong side of the compatibility curve and at the point where their value has dropped too far to try to diagnose issues. The going rate for a DL380 G5 is ~$200US. They can be found for far less (chassis down to $30). Where did you get the new motherboard? If it's from the HP parts depot (through support ...


5

Buy computers with Intel vPro built into the chipset or ship them to your end users with KVMoIP cards.


5

Unplug it, unrack it, and throw it away. It's so old that Dell won't support it. You should replace it with a more modern R320 or similar, which would also be way more power efficient.


5

Several issues actually: This is a drive which is not supported in this machine. Never tested with it, the firmware mismatches and so on. You can ignore this, since the server is long since EOL anyhow, so who cares about warranty, support, and whatever this machine does (because who would use an EOL server for production, right?) You haven't mentioned how ...


5

A bad BIOS update can in principle break your system in just about any way. But a broken file system is a highly unlikely outcome of that. The most likely outcome of a bad BIOS upgrade is that the system either doesn't boot or it boots but doesn't detect all hardware. Neither would manifest itself as an error during file system check. A much more likely ...


5

Based on user discussions in a thread by Webjunkie in the ServeTheHome Forums it appears that there is a date dependent bug that causes this behavior on some of the Supermicro X9 boards: It seems like SuperMicro X9 boards with E3v1/v2 CPUs (X9SCL-F, X9SCL+-F, X9SCI-LN4F, X9SCA-F, X9SCM-F, X9SCM-IIF, etc) will not allow you to enter BIOS if the system date ...


4

I have had this problem. The issue is either iDrac 7 or the Lifecycle Controller. I've updated both to their latest firmwares to no avail. If you can log in to iDrac, and check the LifeCycle Controller, you will find a CPU divide by 0 error. This occurs during the start up process due to buggy (read that poor) programming that causing a hang when doing ...


4

So, typically any file with the string "readme" in the name is a strong suggestion that you read the complete contents of that file. Here it is, from X7SPA3_719.zip for that model of motherboard. FOR < filename>.zip 1. Save this file to your computer. 2. extract the files to a DOS bootable device (such as a bootable USB stick, or CD). 2. Boot to a ...


4

Final solution was resetting the BIOS settings to "Fail-Safe Defaults" as suggested by Brian.


4

You're looking for Out-Of-Band Management. The best solution is to use purpose-built equipment with the feature set and qualities that you need. There's no shortcut here. It would be nice to know why you're requesting this functionality and what the core issue is. If you have machines that aren't intended to be remotely managed, but have a need to support ...


4

The general rule is if you don't have a reason to switch back to BIOS, stick with UEFI.


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