12

If your PHP Apache web site works with peer, keep this, and let's deal with it. 1. First Method : As authentication is peer based, you have to specify the hostname (usually localhost) using -h option : ssh server "pg_dump -h localhost -U postgres | gzip -c" >/backup/sqlbackup.sql.gz The main issue here is that you will be prompted for the postgres ...


11

The minimum permissions to back up a database are PUBLIC at the server level and DB_BACKUPOPERATOR at a database level. In SQL Server 2005, Microsoft recommended against removing NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM from the sysadmin role: The NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM account is also granted a SQL Server login. The NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM account is provisioned in the ...


6

Are there any possible issues I may be overlooking if I stick to using solely file system-level backups? Yes - but not the ones you're thinking of. So long as you do the file-system level copy right that's safe, it's reliance on physical backups that's the risk. In writing this, I noticed that the chapter on filesystem level backups needs to be updated to ...


6

Based on my knowledge, for now, Azure SQL database(Paas) does not support snapshot. There are many ways that you could choose to backup SQL database, please refer to this blog:Different ways to Backup your Windows Azure SQL Database. But for SQL server on Azure VM(Iaas), Azure VM supports create snapshot. You could do it easily on Azure Portal. More ...


6

The answer comes from understanding how snapshotting works. At the start of a snapshot, a message (command) is sent to all applications to come to a consistent state and flush necessary data to disk. How long this flush takes depends on how much data is in memory, what state the data is in, and how long it takes to write the data to disk. Once each ...


5

What is the most safest backup solution for single mongod? Two options: Use mongodump against the running mongod. It won't block, but it'll cause some read locking and general noise as it backs up your databases. It's not normally a big deal unless you've got a lot of contention for the database. Depending on your filesystem, take snapshots of the ...


5

Use gpg (GnuPG). You'll be able to generate multiple keys and encrypt a file for decryption with any key from chosen list. Also GPG keys are not symmetric — your server only need public keys for encryption. Private keys, used for decryption, might be securely stored somewhere else. You can for example print one private key as QRcode for your director and ...


5

The compression with -Fc (custom format) dumps is done client-side. Per the documentation: This format is also compressed by default There is no protocol compression done between client and server. PostgreSQL protocol compression would be very nice to have, but hasn't yet been implemented. You can run pg_dump server-side and stream its compressed dump ...


5

Your transaction log backup is truncating the logs in the sense that it's making room in the existing log file for more transactions. If you want to shrink the log file, you need to choose the "shrink file" option in SSMS. Right click the database to find that option. If the file size you shrink it to isn't large enough, based on how many transactions your ...


4

Question: Can Postgres be setup on a 10GB or 100GB sized system to not use special backup software, but instead just use traditional filesystem backup software (filesystem snapshots?) and has a reasonable method of recovery using this method? Yes, if the file system snapshots are atomic. This is extremely important. You must have an atomic snapshot, you can'...


4

Without application-level quiescing, your backups would be crash-consistent. The recovered VM would look like it had suddenly had its power cut off... For your purposes, it's important to understand how your application deals with sudden power loss or an unplanned hard reset. If it can recover gracefully, then the way Veeam backups are running should ...


4

One option you have is to copy your RDS snapshots to another AWS account. This is a commonly-used practice. This can be done by: Sharing your RDS snapshot with your second AWS account. Copy ("pull") the RDS snapshot to the target account from the source account. Remove the sharing on the source snapshot. https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-rds-update-...


4

9GB compressed dump isn't really that large. You just need to make do it right: dump from EC2 instance in the same AWS account and region that RDS database is running — not over the internet; use directory dump format (--format=directory or -Fd) — it's automatically compressed; use parallel dump (for example --jobs=16 or -j16) and parallel restore; use ...


4

Put them wherever you'd like. As long as they're also copied elsewhere, preferably off-site. The only thing approaching a "best practice" here would be to put the backups on their own filesystem, so they don't fill up the root filesystem and cause problems.


4

UPDATE: In April 2020, Microsoft updated their documentation regarding Azure SQL's Database Copy feature to clarify that a database copy in Azure SQL is not an instantaneous snapshot. While the Database Copy feature does create a transactionally consistent snapshot, the point-in-time at which the snapshot is taken is not instantaneous and could be at any ...


3

I was diagnosing a similar issue implementing Ola's scripts. It would work on some servers and not others. I would get: "Msg 50000, Level 16, State 1, Procedure DatabaseBackup, Line 395 XXX The directory does not exist." In my case the problem was that although SQL Agent was running under a domain acct with sufficient privileges SQL Server itself was not. ...


3

We do this a lot at my company. The main thing you'll probably use is "find" (man find). For instance: find /home -type f -ctime +14 -exec rm -f {} \; will delete all files from /home on down that have been created older than 14 days. You can further specify options for find to hone in on the files you are targeting. Let me know if you need further ...


3

No, there is no such MySQL user created by default in CentOS.


3

Not taking into account any specific syntax for pg_dump: #!/bin/bash $TODAY=`date --iso-8601` $BACKDIR=/backup pg_dump [options] > $BACKDIR/$HOSTNAME-$TODAY if [ "$?"-ne 0]; then echo "Help" | mail -s "Backup failed" you@example.com; exit 1; fi


3

Their backup strategy shouldn't be driven by your opinion, it should be driven by their recovery point objective and recovery time objective. Have that discussion with the client and then implement a backup strategy that meets those objectives. That being said, I'd be very surprised if a restore of the database and transaction logs of the quantity and size ...


3

I also wanted an offsite backup of my AWS RDS, and the code, logs, etc. I do this by: Doing a database export periodically (nightly at midnight, for me) into a given directory Having Attic Backup back up that directory. This does a differential, compressed, de-duplicated backup. It keeps weekly, monthly, and yearly snapshots - that's configurable in case ...


3

If you're going to use a hardware card, RAID 50 or 60 seems fine for this case. 10 is overkill. For storing a backup of living data (rather than something like tapes), I generally prefer the use of ZFS or BTRFS to maintain the integrity of my dataset and to provide reasonably functional inline snapshots. That would preclude the use of a hardware RAID ...


2

Here is the bash script I have running on my webserver. It has served me well for some time now. It includes a part at the end to remove old backups. You can specify the number of files you would like to keep in the variables section. You have to uncomment that part of the script to get it to run. #!/bin/sh #################################################...


2

You can take a look at MSDN. SKIP and NOSKIP arguments controls whether a backup operation checks the expiration date and time of the backup sets on the media before overwriting them. SKIP disables the checking of backup set expiration and name that is usually performed by the BACKUP statement to prevent overwrites of backup sets.


2

You are redirecting the wrong way. Your command, as written, writes stdout of the mysql process to your .sql file. Give that angle brace a 180 degree spin and give 'er another try.


2

The usual approach is to tell the application to flush its changes to disk and halt processing. Then you take a snapshot of the underlying filesystem. At this point you can re-enable the application. Then you backup the snapshot. The same thing can be accomplished by shutting down the application and database. Without knowing what the application and ...


2

do I need to unlock the DB for writing after I issued the comand ec2-create-snapshot or after it's finished and the actual snapshot is created once the ec2-create-snapshot api cmd returns (with the snap-id), you are good to unlock for writing. However, you may see slightly degraded performance until snap is finished. Amazon sends new writes during the ...


2

Since you said "msdb", I'll just assume you're using Microsoft SQL. Knowing the version would be somewhat helpful. Do this with either a Windows Scheduled Task or a SQL Maintenance Plan. The latter will be simple and graphical. A SQL Maintenance Plan will be easier because you can simply specify "all user databases", which excludes the system databases. ...


2

In order to avoid such nightmare, you should use pre-freeze/post-thaw scripts to setup for job which backs this VM up. If needed, check related topics in Veeam forum to ask others about their experience and scripts' examples.


2

The issue has been resolved. I created a new network share location, giving it very open permissions (everyone:Full control), and the backup works to that location. Whatever the issue is, it must be isolated to NTFS/Share permissions on the target. I dont' know why several of my clients were all having the same issue, but this fix worked on all of them. I've ...


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