15

So you want to backup all your drive without all those nasty mistakes and also filter out all the /proc and other temporary folders? An option is to mount the root folder onto another folder within the filesystem, like this: $ cd /mnt $ mkdir drive $ mount --bind / drive This will give you all the files there are on your drive that are not deemed ...


10

In Linux everything is a file. It's possible via rsync, but there are things to be aware of, that are (at best) difficult to get around. You should think about replication first, especially for databases. Also this is a good idea to set up proxy / load balancer in front of your primary server, so you can easly switch back and forth with your primary and ...


5

What you actually want is restores. Whatever you do, you must restore test it regularly. Linode has a backup service. The snapshots can be taken on a limited pre-defined schedule or with an API. An advantage of snapshot based backups is that they offer a sharp point in time, as data isn't changing while a copy is made. Snapshots also can easily be ...


2

Use the source! Searching Debian source code for the phrase "invoked oom-killer" finds mm/oom_kill.c which has the 9 columns header it is supposed to print. * Dumps the current memory state of all eligible tasks. Tasks not in the same * memcg, not in the same cpuset, or bound to a disjoint set of mempolicy nodes * are not shown. * State information ...


2

failing a PCI scan Document for your auditor the version of the package installed. Reference security updates regarding OpenSSH, in this case from Debian. Possibly cross reference relevant CVEs. Parsing a version number is fragile. Stable distros generally do not upgrade the version, but apply their own patches.


2

In Apache httpd like many other applications, the default value will be used for any and all values that are not set (and commented out is the same in that regard) so you can safely comment out values that are : set to their default value (set at compile time) In Apache httpd, when you use name based virtual hosting, the first VirtualHost will in many ...


2

On Debian jessie (currently oldstable and in LTS; you should have LTS enabled and be upgrading within the next few months) ssh RSA keys are currently generated with 2048 bits. But if the system was upgraded to jessie, it might have had old keys generated with 1024 bits. You can use a command like the following to check the status of the host RSA key: error@...


1

Run your system on ZFS. Then you can take an instantaneous, atomic snapshot using something akin to: # zfs snap -r tank@name-of-backup where tank is whatever your ZFS pool is named. This snapshot is guaranteed to be an instantaneous moment-in-time snapshot of the filesystem and all of its child filesystems. Once you've created the snapshot, you can ...


1

I'm using BackupPC for my small virtual private server, this works reasonably well. BackupPC can use rsync under the hood and supports full and incremental backups. Have a look at it and see whether it would cover your requirements.


1

In your main.cf of Postfix you have the following line: content_filter = amavis:[127.0.0.1]:10024 Not a fault, just a side note of what I use to practice to avoid mix-ups: Use an unique identifier like: content_filter = amavisfeed:[127.0.0.1]:10024 The main problem lies in your master.cf of Postfix. You are basically telling Postfix to use amavisd in the ...


1

The canonical answer to a whole class of problems "I know iptables commands, but I can't see what is actually happening to the packets" is: Look at the packets using one of the tools (order of preference): wireshark where you have GUI tshark (wireshark's textual interface) tcpdump (predecessor of tshark, speaking very roughly) Do it not only on the end-...


1

#deb cdrom:[Debian GNU/Linux 8.3.0 _Jessie_ - Official i386 NETINST Binary-1 20160123-18:00]/ jessie main I think it because you're running debian 32 bit, there is no package available for 32bit for Debian https://packages.gitlab.com/gitlab/gitlab-ee you might need to install from source and compile it for 32 bit or upgrade your system to 64bit.


1

Have you disabled the Jessie repo's? If not, please try that, execute apt update && apt upgrade if that was succesful try executing apt dist-upgrade and reboot to finish and confirm the upgrade.


1

Common causes for SSHD refusing to (re)start are configuration errors. Check with: $ /usr/sbin/sshd -T


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