68

Simple and easy solution: just specify the unwanted packages with an extra - after each of them. Example without the - switch: root@debian:~# apt-get install bsd-mailx Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done The following extra packages will be installed: exim4-base exim4-config exim4-daemon-light ...


42

After you install the package with the --ignore-depends option, go and edit the /var/lib/dpkg/status file, and remove whatever dependency you think is not needed. Just be very careful. In order a dep. to be required, it is more than likely to BE required


23

apt-cache depends pkgname will show a package's dependencies. If you want it all in one command, you could do worse than: apt-get install `apt-cache depends pkgname | awk '/Depends:/{print$2}'`


15

apt-get provides a command for exactly that... apt-get build-dep <package name> From the man pages you get build-dep causes apt-get to install/remove packages in an attempt to satisfy the build dependencies for a source package. By default the dependencies are satisfied to build the package natively. If desired a host-architecture can be specified ...


12

None of the above worked for me - maybe outdated - anyway, I found this solution: apt-get -o Dpkg::Options::="--force-confmiss" install --reinstall mysql-common


12

An alternate way to manually tweak the dependencies is: apt-get download yourpackage dpkg-deb -x yourpackage.deb PackageFolder dpkg-deb --control yourpackage.deb PackageFolder/DEBIAN vim PackageFolder/DEBIAN/control dpkg -b PackageFolder yourpackage2.deb apt-get install ./yourpackage2.deb


11

It wasn't long after I started using Chef in earnest that I was coming up against these same issues. I only came to some sense of sanity when I started doing four things operationally. Note that these may not be considered "best practices" by some in the Chef community. Nonetheless, this is how I brought sanity, repeatability, and order to my world....


10

Welcome to Server Fault. In general this type of question is not on-topic here. It is expected that most sysadmins will have already faced this issue before they became a sysadmin through tinkering with their own workstations. However, sysadmins coming from a Windows background may not have faced this, so here are some things to consider: Why not use a ...


10

Run the following yum remove epel-release Then run yum update That should fix your problem


9

You can download the package with apt-get and then install it with dpkg, manually listing the dependancy you would like to be ignored. For example if I want to download mypackage but it depends on libperl5.14 and I dont want to install libperl5.14 as I have a different version I can ignore this dependancy as follow: apt-get download mypackage dpkg -i --...


9

It appears you have a Centos 6 machine but have configured the Epel repository for Centos 7. That is not going to work. Remove it and install the Centos 6 Epel Repository at: wget http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm Make sure you uninstall anything you added from the Centos 7 Epel repository as well. That should do ...


7

I've been looking for this option on a Ubuntu 12.04 Server running Xen. In my domains I use the -virtual kernel, and apt persistently tried to install grub with every kernel package upgrade. Grub however is not needed inside the domU when using p[yv]grub. I've been looking for the -nodeps option to apt-get as well, but it didn't work, so ended up ...


7

first: sudo apt-get purge locales then: sudo aptitude install locales and the famous: sudo dpkg-reconfigure locales This rids the system of locales, then re-installs locales and downgrades libc6 from 2.19 to 2.13 which is the issue. Then configures locales again.


6

sendmail is a meta package consisting of a set of dependencies. When you install the sendmail metapackage it installs sendmail-bin, amongst other things. This provides a recommended package for cron, for example, but I believe there are also some other packages that recommend packages in the sendmail dependency chain. Autoremove will not remove auto ...


6

You configured your system to use packages from several distributions at once (a so-called Frankenstein-Debian), so dependency errors are normal. Run cat /etc/apt/sources.list{,.d/*.list} in bash to list all sources. Your libc6 (version 2.27-6) is stuck somewhere between stretch (version 2.24-11+deb9u4) and buster (version 2.28-10). My guess is you pulled ...


5

Reinstall Failed RPMS I've seen this issue happen when something fails during the RPM transaction. The RPM database can become out of sync with the system. As a result what the system actually has and what RPM thinks is installed varies. TIP: Before doing any of this creat an AMI image so you can easily recover if things completely fail. You can use rpm ...


5

To get librsync.h then sudo apt-get install python-dev sudo apt-get install librsync-dev work for me.


4

There is an enthusiastic case made here, which ends with the summary: All package managers do relatively the same thing. Move files. Pick a package manager on how well it does that. All build tools do relatively the same thing. Transform files. Pick your build tools on how well they do that. If you're not using npm now solely because someone told ...


4

Not directly, though some of the packages you install via npm (e.g. socket.io) will emit client-side Javascript libraries. There's another tool called Bower which is designed for client-side Libraries. There may be others, but this is the one I've seen mentioned the most. It's used internally by Google's Yeoman tool for the client-side libraries.


4

It seems to me you're trying to bind postgres to an IP associated with the tunnel. If that's the case, the ip_nonlocal_bind is the solution to your problems. Setting the ip_nonlocal_bind allows you to bind to any IP, even one not associated with your computer, which is exactly what you want when you want to bind to an IP you don't yet have - for instance ...


4

rpm does not know anything about local filesystems. It only looks in it's own database for what is on the system. In your case that is a non-standard place to put the library. Generally the standard place is in /usr/lib64/mysql/ and yours is in /custom so rpm is not finding it where it should be. Here are two options.. 1) rebuild the custom one by adding ...


4

yum install $(repoquery --requires <package>)


4

Check your yum.conf to see if there is an exclude argument, eg.: exclude=apache* httpd* mod_* mysql* MySQL* da_* *ftp* exim* sendmail* bind-chroot* This is sometimes set by default when using for example DirectAdmin or other control panel apps.


4

You could try repoquery --whatrequires --installed python --installed Restrict query ONLY to installed pkgs - disables all repos and only acts on rpmdb --whatrequires CAPABILITY Query all packages that require CAPABILITY.


4

The problem is you randomly grabbed an RPM off the Internet. This is a very bad idea overall. It appears OpenVPN is in the EPEL repository, which you should already have installed. So once you install EPEL on your system, you can just do: yum install openvpn like any other package.


4

aptitude will let you specify a query instead of a package name when installing. If you wanted to install the dependencies of package named foo, you can install the packages which have a reverse dependency on foo: aptitude install '?reverse-depends(foo)' or aptitude install '~Rfoo' The problem with installing a package then removing it, is that all of ...


4

first you have to create a repo file for your new repo (the dvd) For example a file called /etc/yum.repos.d/dvd.repo [dvd] name=Local DVD Repository baseurl=file:///mnt/DVD enabled=1 gpgcheck=1 Then you should disable your other repos and update, and you'll be able to run a yum update from there.


4

dpkg --remove DOES remove the packages without complaining about the failed install. That get you disk space to do apt-get -f autoremove


4

The version of xorgxrdp currently in EPEL was built against RHEL 7.7, specifically against (among other packages) the xorg-x11-server-Xorg package version shipped in RHEL 7.7, but you are running CentOS 7.6. It is not currently possible for you to install this package, until CentOS 7.7 is released. EPEL does not generally keep older versions of packages, so ...


4

Your problem here is that at some point in time, you installed a package from a source which contained a newer libc6, and that version of libc6 got installed. Now your packages are broken, since the libc6-dev package has a version of 2.24-11+deb9u4, but the libc6 package is at 2.27-6. This is probably because of the buster repository you mentioned. The big ...


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