5

Without access to the server it's quite hard to tell exactly if it's needed or not, but it sounds like you're running a public DNS server since it's been targeted by exploits. The only reason to run a DNS server on the public Internet is to serve records, so I'd be surprised if someone set it up correctly without any need for it. The best place to start is ...


3

It sounds like DNS Recursion is enabled, fortunately it is an easy one to answer: Check for any Forward or Reverse Lookup Zones. If there are any forward zones, check the nameserver records at the registrar for those domains, and make sure they are not pointed to the DNS server. If they are not, turn off DNS completely. If they are, disable recursion on the ...


2

If you want to take eg ns2.example.com out of the rotation from a DNS point of view you would have to remove that NS record both from the zone itself and from the delegation (through your registrar). Then wait until caches expire. With that in mind, if this is something you need to happen immediately and/or if this will just be a brief outage, it might be ...


2

ns{1,2,3,4}.name.com appear to use anycast, based on observing <1ms latencies from vastly different locations. (It actually seems to be one NSOne service or another.) Based on the problem description (the problem only occurs for your newer records and occurs seemingly at random, but not from just any client) and knowing that it's an anycast service, I get ...


1

I am trying to send dns query with NAPTR+SRV+A query If you mean doing one DNS query for multiple record types at the same time, then no, this is not possible under current DNS specifications. There have been various works and ideas floating around to do that (specially to be able to get A and AAAA records together) but nothing emerged as a standard, so you ...


1

When using free DNS servers offered at registrars, you're going to have to expect that you'll get poor service. These kinds of transient resolution errors are not uncommon. If you want consistent DNS responses you need to use a premium DNS service, or host your own nameservers to meet your needs and also be able to troubleshoot end-to-end resolution errors. ...


1

In AWS's Route 53, you can create hosted zones, which is basically the logical equivalent of a zone file. You can modify it's entries via AWS's web console. Manually editing zones-files with a text-editor is not intended from AWS. No EC2-Instances or other servers need to be involved. To make these hosted zones work for your domain, you must list AWS's DNS-...


1

What you want to do, is have a DNS zone configured on your internal DNS server for example.com, which points app1.example.com to the internal IP address of the system providing your service. At your external DNS hosting provider, you will need to create an A record to point app1.example.com to your external IP address. Your internal domain example.internal ...


1

DNSMASQ added a caa-record option in version 2.80, released in October 2018 (after the original accepted answer). I'm adding this answer since this is still the top result for "dnsmasq caa" on Google for me. Please note that the previous answer still works fine and is useful for older versions of DNSMASQ! Manual Entry for caa-record --caa-record=&...


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