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58

What they're talking about is that when you use a CNAME to point to their services (which is only possible on subdomain, not the zone root - it can't coexist with the SOA and NS records that are required on the root of your zone), they can make a change to their own DNS records to work around some kind of availability issue. With a zone root, you must use ...


55

ICANN explains this pretty well in their blog (https://www.icann.org/news/blog/abkhazia-kosovo-south-ossetia-transnistria-my-oh-my): As at this time, Abkhazia, Kosovo, Transnistria, Somaliland, South Ossetia and others are not in the ISO 3166-1 standard, so ICANN is not in a position to grant any corresponding country-code domain for them. By ...


48

Actually, you're allowed to set the From address to your customer's email, as long as you correctly set the Sender field to your own address. This is what Paypal does used to do! FROM: customer@yourCustomer.com TO: recipient@recipient.com SENDER: you@yourCompany.com Most email clients will render this as "From you@yourCompany.com On Behalf Of ...


46

It is bad practice for several reasons: You are NOT allowed to send a mail from a domain you do not own. As such, it could be conceived as an attempt at impersonation. It's a common enough practice used by spammers and, as such, is frequently tagged by spam filters. It is pretty common for well-maintained domains to use SPF or DKIM to protect their ...


37

Yes, you own and control the entire namespace below the domain you purchase, because DNS is hierarchical. Creating mail.example.com and blog.example.com is just a matter of adding entries to the DNS zone that you control. Since you asked about the name. domain, I'll address that specifically: You cited its eligibility requirements and have confused this ...


34

There are no direct limits on how many levels i.e. dots you can have in a hostname. However, a RFC1034 compliant hostname can only be 255 bytes long, leaving 253 bytes for a fully qualified domain name FQDN in DNS. Some systems and TLS/SSL limits FQDN to 64 bytes and FQDN in emails should not exceed(*) 245 or 221 bytes depending on the maximum user name ...


30

If you've named your Active Directory example.org then you cannot prevent this. You've gone against Microsft's best practices for naming an AD and you're seeing one of the symptoms. You have a few choices: Migrate to a properly named AD. Something like corp.example.org. Install a web server on each DC and configure it to forward web requests for example....


28

This is not going to be an IT tech answer, but hopefully useful nonetheless. Speaking from years of experience, you will not be able to convince your boss to do everything differently. The primary reason for this is that he is the boss while you are just his subordinate. You are in the wrong position to push fundamental changes. Can you live with the ...


24

They do depend on com. - but it does not have an A record and you can't look it up like that. Try looking for the NS record instead: nslookup > set type=NS > com. Server: 12.12.12.12 Address: 12.12.12.12#53 Non-authoritative answer: com nameserver = b.gtld-servers.net. com nameserver = f.gtld-servers.net. com nameserver = j.gtld-servers.net. ...


24

When you connect by IP address the SSH connection goes directly to your server but if you use the domain name it goes through Cloudflare defenses. My suggestion would be to either use direct.pollnote.com (I think CloudFlare creates it automaticaly but people often remove it) or add your own alias like ssh.pollnote.com and disable CloudFlare protection on it.


23

Yes, the hostname really is case-insensitive, as specified in RFC 3986 § 3.2.2, because hostnames in general are case-insensitive in the DNS. This RFC also gives recommendations on how to avoid the problems you mentioned: Although host is case-insensitive, producers and normalizers should use lowercase for registered names and hexadecimal addresses ...


22

No. The full list of records supported by Google Domains can be found at: https://support.google.com/domains/answer/3290350 There is no 'ALIAS' or 'ANAME' or any other similar pseudo-CNAME supported. Please note that the type of record mentioned by the Heroku documentation is not an actual CNAME, but rather an A record that is auto-updated to match some ...


19

The domain-name option specifies the client's domain name (of which there can only be one), and is specified in resolv.conf with the domain keyword. This is the domain which will be used when running hostname -f on the client. The domain-search option specifies a list of domains to use when looking up bare hostnames, and is specified in resolv.conf with the ...


18

There are several well-known ways of locating whois servers for TLDs, the IANA database is probably the closest to what the question asks for, however there are other sources that may be more useful in practice. From IANA (access via whois and http) Browse http://www.iana.org/domains/root/db or search the whois database at whois.iana.org for the TLD. Each ...


18

You need to focus on how it helps them, not on what you "want." we have coped for years without an issue And you don't want to start now! There have been a number of data breaches lately, including Target, Home Depot, and more. Home Depot spent $43,000,000 on its data breach in only one quarter. Target paid $10,000,000 in a settlement. An IBM ...


18

repadmin /showobjmeta DCNAME "ObjectDN" Will show the originating DSA. Example: repadmin /showobjmeta CONTOSOMDDC1 "CN=Administrator,CN=Users,DC=contoso,DC=com" 54 entries. Loc.USN Originating DSA Org.USN Org.Time/Date Ver Attribute ======= =============== ========= ============= ...


17

You're not missing anything. Domain 'com' exists, but has no A records. If you look for NS records (domain server records), you get results (as expected). ; <<>> DiG 9.9.1-P2 <<>> NS com ;; global options: +cmd ;; Got answer: ;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 25150 ;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: ...


17

No, but you can have Google Domains forward your root domain to your www CNAME. First create a CNAME in the Custom Records section pointing www to yourapp.herokuapp.com. Then in the Synthetic Records section, choose Subdomain forward, enter @ in the subdomain field and www.yourdomain.com in the Destination URL field. Save those and you're done.


16

No, there is no "global" list; every company maintains their own classifications. So you will have to contact each one individually.


16

If you have a switch that supports it, 'protected ports' for cabled connections or 'client isolation' for access points on Wi-Fi can help you eliminate traffic between hosts in the same Layer-2 network. For example, this is from Cisco switch manual: Protected ports have these features: A protected port does not forward any traffic (unicast, multicast, ...


15

Apache2 supports serving different contents depending on domain names, even if all those domains resolve to the same IP address. Each of the domain names is handled by a virtual host, thus the name name-based virtual host. Here is a sample configuration for two domains: NameVirtualHost *:80 <VirtualHost *:80> ServerName www.yourfirstdomain.tld ...


15

Quite a few things will happen with no DC available: If the domain controller is the only DNS server, the first complaint you will get is that the internet is broken, because the clients have no DNS. Since DC's usually also run DHCP, computers won't be able to connect to the network at all. Computers that are already connected will keep working for awhile. ...


15

Yes, you will have to buy another certificate* The asterisk wildcard character * will only match 1 label in a resolved FQDN. This behavior reflects RFC 4592 Section 3.3, in its description of DNS label matching and fallback to the asterisk label. If you only need to secure a single endpoint under the .internal.mycompany.com. namespace, you don't need a ...


14

The latter. .uk is a CCTLD, or Country Code Top-Level Domain; .co.uk is a subdomain thereof. The whole of the .uk namespace is operated by Nominet Ltd. For many years, direct registration under .uk hasn't been allowed, and the namespace has been split into the subdomains we know and love (including .co.uk, .org.uk, .net.uk, .me.uk, .parliament.uk, and so ...


14

For general HTTP purposes (web browsing, etc.), DNS cannot be used to direct a browser to use a specific port. Browsers are hard-codes to assume 80 for HTTP and 443 for HTTPS. You "could" host another web site on that sub domain that just does a redirect to the target site and port.


13

As an addition to @ShaneMadden's answer, one workaround is for the third-party platform to also manage your DNS zone. For example, if you use AWS's Elastic Load Balancer service, and their Route 53 DNS service, you can reliably point the zone apex at an ELB instance using their custom alias records, which allows them to update your DNS zone in response to ...


13

I opened a case with Microsoft Premier Support. Here is the email between me and Microsoft support. They basically say that it's a known issue. It's not a bug and it's not a feature. The back-end will parse the user name and strip out the illegal characters properly The front-end doesn't do any UI validation because there might be some other third party ...


13

The first MX means that the IP addresses in the MX record(s) for the domain you're actually attaching the SPF record to should be accepted as valid. The second one means that IP addresses in the MX record(s) for the domain mail.mydomain.com should be accepted as valid. If this SPF record is for the domain mail.mydomain.com, then the second one is redundant. ...


13

Although I wouldn't be surprised if in practice the registration requirements are only checked on registration and not for renewals, you don't have to lose your domain when you leave Europe. A number of registrars provide trustee services that allow the registration of a .FR domain to people/organisations that don't qualify directly and your domain can be ...


12

TL;DR: It's a bad practice to use the email address from the form. Instead, use an email address that is specifically used for this mailinglist only. Long version: First, there are actually two email addresses used. One is the envelope sender, the other one is the one shown on the From:-line in the email. The envelope sender is the one used by email servers ...


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