13

The trick is to create a Synthetic Record for a any subdomain other that *. Create the synthetic record for wildcard.domainname.com instead of *.domainname.com. Then create a CNAME record (not synthetic) of the subdomain *.domain.com and point it to your synthetic records subdomain wildcard.domainname.com. The placeholder subdomain wildcard could really ...


7

Finally figured it out. Thanks to @Håkan Lindqvist for inspiration. These solutions are probably Debian/Ubuntu-specific and weren't tested in other distros. 1. FIRST SOLUTION (Using update-policy local;). You may actually use update-policy local; directive in /etc/bind/named.conf.local in each zone declaration you want, which restricts update requests ...


7

Different views act separately, it's essentially a convenience over running separate instances of named. If there are zones with the same name in different views this is just a coincidence, they are still entirely separate zones, no more related than any other zones. Having multiple separate zones use the same zone file does not work in situations where ...


6

I was having very similar issues until I changed the location of where I stored my zone files. Bind had permission to write to /var/cache/bind, but your zone files are stored in /etc/bind/.... Bind does not currently have permission to write to files in /etc/bind/..., so you would need to update Bind's permissions or store the zone files in a directory ...


6

Have you tried using "example.com" instead of the IP address? At least with Apache, the whole point of the server_name field is to allow multiple websites (name spaces) to be served from a single IP address. The client that is following "http://example.com" does the DNS lookup and sends the request to the IP address it gets from the DNS lookup, but ...


5

The simplest way forward would be to use mDNS to do "ad-hoc" DNS resolution amongst the machines in the same subnet. This is, basically, as simple as installing avahi-daemon and libnss-mdns (Debian package names; adjust as appropriate) and making sure your firewall isn't blocking 5353/udp. This will cover both forward and reverse DNS entries, and create ...


5

Because it actually isn't an instant change with DynamicDNS or CloudFlare. No matter what service you use, there is a time starting at the time you make the change lasting until the cached records expire on all the other DNS servers in the world. This time is governed by the TTL, which for some services (like DynamicDNS) is kept low to allow for frequent ...


5

By default the client itself does its own DDNS update if it is XP or newer. A DHCP server can perform proxy updates for DNS clients that don't support updating their own client records. You can also force a client registration via ipconfig /registerdns Here's a good link, simple enough: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc771255.aspx Domain ...


5

If you have only one site configured, then you can try using this in nginx config: server_name _ ; If will force server to accept all HTTP requests, no matter what Host header is.


5

This question shows a misunderstanding of the purpose of the server_name declaration. It is common amongst servers to be able to specify the IP address of the interfaces that you wish to create the listening socket. However, with NGINX, that is not achieved using the server_name directive. To understand the server_name directive, you need to understand ...


4

You could do this with delegation. It's easier if all the remote records are under a single sub-domain, like let's say you have cloud.domain.com and your BIND server has a zone matching that. In Windows DNS, create a sub-domain (right click the zone, click New Domain...), call it cloud. That looks like a sub-folder. Within there, create NS records that ...


4

My apologies for quoting the manual verbatim, but they are probably better writers than I am https://ftp.isc.org/www/bind/arm95/Bv9ARM.ch04.html In short: the zone file is not the absolute thruth when allowing dynamic updates. All changes made to a zone using dynamic update are stored in the zone's journal file. This file is automatically created by the ...


3

You'll likely pay $0.50 or $0.51 a month. DNS queries are cached, so a user should really only be making a billable DNS query every once in a while. For dynamic DNS a TTL of 10 minutes is probably a good idea, for other stuff an hour or a day is common.


3

You can configure all this stuff inside the ssh config file, usually found at the location: $HOME/.ssh/config for example: Host abc Hostname 1.2.3.4 Port 345 IdentityFile /path/to/id_rsa LocalForward 8888 localhost:8888 User root Host def Hostname 2.3.4.5 User root LocalForward 8889 localhost:8889 This way, you just need to ...


2

It should be sort of doable, but needs the master DNS to come back up eventually. Firstly, you need to use the "allow-update-forwarding" parameter in the slave DNS zone. Use the same key as you use the "allow-update" in the master DNS zone. Secondly, you need to tell the DHCP servers to contact the secondary DNS servers if they fail to contact the primary....


2

From what I understand, MS clients can update their resource records (Understanding Dynamic Update) via secure, AD integrated updates. Also, MS DHCP can do this on behalf of a client (e.g. non-MS devices). This requires non-secure updates, IIRC.


2

This almost always happens with Namecheap's default DNS, as they don't update straight away, creating a misalignment when you enter the domain in the browser and the DNS attempts to resolve to where Namecheap first pointed it (its own parking page) when actually their system already has pointed it where you wanted it to go... they just didn't update the DNS (...


2

The downside would be that dynamic DNS is still DNS, and therefore subject to DNS caching (and violations of the specified TTL are rampant on the internet - AOL was infamous for forcing all TTLs to a minimum of one hour regardless of what's specified by the authoritative name server). Quite simply DigitalOcean does not seem to be an appropriate solution ...


2

You're using nsupdate -l which sends the update message to localhost (the verbose output confirms that it used the loopback address, as expected, Sending update to 127.0.0.1#53). However, the zone you are attempting to update is not in the view that this update message will hit. Your first view (localhost_view) has match-clients { localhost_acl; };. acl ...


2

You can have all the services resolve to a single IP, then use port forwarding to direct the traffic to the appropriate server. This is a commonly used solution. If you are running an email server you should either get a fixed IP address, or use your provider's relay for outgoing email. You wouldn't need a DDNS solution in this case. Many providers ...


2

My solution was to simply remove the bind 'zone' entry and let samba have control. I assume they would be conflicting anyway. If you look on the samba docs site.. https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Setup_a_basic_BIND_installation You will see that they leave out any extra zones other than the 'localhost' ones.


2

I cannot answer specifically to Google app cloud, but here is what is happening behind the scenes. When you go to www.domain.com there is a DNS lookup. So you must first have dns for www.domain.com, pointing at the same server, servers (if you are doing round robin dns load balacing), or load balancing ip (if you are load balancing somewhere else) as ...


2

Something else you should do/need to do is to configure scavenging on one of the DC\DNS servers and on the DNS zone(s). This will clean up old, stale A records automatically. Note that you only need to enable scavenging on one of your DC/DNS servers, as the AD zone is integrated the DNS zone will be replicated to all other DC\DNS servers so any changes you ...


2

It's technically possible but not recommended. The main problem is that when the IP address changes it's unexpected, while it needs immediate actions. TTL for glue records is fixed and can't be lowered, while dynamic DNS records works because of extremely low TTL. Therefore, the NS pointing to DDNS hostname MUST be on a separate domain. Another problem is ...


2

They will have to download nsupdate from BIND (https://www.isc.org/downloads/). It is possible to call nsupdate from a PowerShell host.


2

An Apache or Nginx reverse proxy would do. Below is a simple example with nginx reverse proxy, including load balancing. http { upstream backend_server_2 { # load balanced server block ip_hash; server 10.1.1.2:8080 weight=2; server 10.1.1.3:8080 weight=1; } server { listen public_ip:80; server_name example1.com; ...


2

Can there coexist a static and a dynamically created A record for the same host A name can resolve to multiple IP addresses, that is have multiple A or AAAA records. Clients will get the whole set of them when querying for the name. How the IP addresses are provisioned is kind of irrelevant to the above, except that in "dynamic" cases, often an ...


1

You can do this using $INCLUDE in your zone file, which will allow you to split the contents of the zone to multiple component files arbitrarily. See here for more info.


1

In general, no. They would need to offer either: the ability to add DNS records to their nameservers for your subdomain via some sort of admin panel the ability to delegate management of MYNAME.go.myisp.tld to nameservers of your choosing via NS records


1

Windows DNS entries have ACLs. Check and/or set them. Generally speaking, dynamically updated hostnames/A records allow anyone to update them, but static ones do not, but either way, this behavior is configurable. When creating a new A record/hostname entry, you have the option to either allow any authenticated user to modify the record or not: And it ...


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