4

check Exchange 2010 logs why it dismounts. It must have logged something. check the move request log -> EMC -> Recipient Config -> Move request -> right click the move request and check status / or properties there should be a lot of info there. check the system event log -> I think event about dismount should go to Windows log -> application log. check all ...


3

1) Is it feasible to replace the exchange server before replacing the DNS/DHCP servers? Will the current Server 2003 DNS/DHCP server be able to communicate with the AD/DS on the new Exchange 2010 server? Yes, definitely. There will be some AD schema updates during the install that will be required, but Exchange 2010 can run just fine in a 2003 domain ...


2

I know this is an old question, but to convert public folders to a mailbox, you would simply click on All Folders in Outlook, click the top-level public folder and then export that folder to a PST, ensuring you have checked to include all subfolders. Then once exported you would import into the shared mailbox you have set up. I understand the need for this ...


2

As mentioned in the comments this is a non-ideal way of doing the migration. I'd imagine that the specific issue you ask about can be worked around by setting the TargetAddress attribute on your users to forward mail to your Exchange online organisation. (This is part of the staged migration process.) If you leave the MX pointing to your on-premises ...


2

This issue was eventually discovered to be due to an improper installation of Exchange 2010. There was a phantom database and a phantom exchange server with residual registry entries that were preventing the proper functionality of the Exchange server. Long story short, I had to individually remove and recreate each of the virtual directories as well as ...


2

I doubt you have "way too much data" in public folders. Public folders are stored using the same ESE engine that stores mailboxes, and I've seen Exchange 2003 installations with upwards of 100GB mailbox databases (though, arguably, they performed very badly compared to newer versions of Exchange, they did work fine). Diagnosing your "replication issues" is ...


2

I would make the following changes: Remove any smart hosts set on SMTP virtual servers. Your smart hosts should be set on the SMTP connectors, not on the SMTP virtual servers themselves. A smart host set on an SMTP virtual server will cause all traffic sent by that virtual server to be sent to the specified smart host (even if the virtual server is just ...


2

The correct way to do it with a. Local is to use the external domain. You set the path to the external'one, you register the certificate (some cheap exist) and you doa split dns setup, so internally the external host will resolve to the internal'one. This is the only clean way.


2

This is a common issue with Outlook 2007 and later (I suppose you use one of these versions, because Outlook 2003 doesn't have these problems). It requires a default gateway to be set. Try the registry fix or use the "Fix it" from MS, I'd say.


2

Invoke-Command: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh849719.aspx From the help: The Invoke-Command cmdlet runs commands on a local or remote computer and returns all output from the commands, including errors. With a single Invoke-Command command, you can run commands on multiple computers. To run a single command on a remote ...


2

We had the same problem here in Germany recently as all the ISP's are now requiring SSL connections from the beginning of the next year (2014). For us the following workaround has worked: We are running a Microsoft Small Business Server 2003 (wich includes Exchange). Since the Exchange 2003 Server does not support SSL encryption natively we had to install ...


2

Get the IP of the server (talk with the hosting provider, etc.) Create a DNS A record pointing mail.example.com to the IP you got in step #1. Create your MX record. To directly address your point about being able to get the MX record by issuing a DNS query from the server itself, that is not a reliable method to get this information.


2

You can do this centrally by creating Contacts for the external recipients in AD and then configuring the forwarding to these Contacts on the relevant user objects in AD.


2

Given the change in IP address, I'd say the most likely cause is that the reputation of the IP you're now using has been trashed by abuse in the past, and has been comprehensively blacklisted. I'd return it to wherever you got it from, as it is not fit for the purpose to which it is to be put. I'd suggest following the instructions in the e-mail, but in ...


2

It's called Managed Folders, and it was introduced in Exchange 2007 and deprecated in favor of Retention Tags in Exchange 2010, although it still exists. Not sure about 2013/365/2016. There are no native options in Exchange 2003. You could find a third-party tool, or simply upgrade off that 10-year-old platform.


2

You can only use CDO/MAPI under Exchange 2003. Not a lot of example exist, but check there: HOW TO:Set folder level permissions using CDO 1.21 and ACL.dll Does it work good, no idea (but it's from microsot's blog and wrote by an microsoft employee) Edited: To create folder, a CDO example:https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms878640(v=exchg.65).aspx ...


2

It's been possible to have more than one Exchange mailbox server on a domain for as long as I can remember. As PJ Mahoney notes in their comments, older versions of Exchange have also been designed to work well with Windows Clustering. Modern versions of Exchange (2010, 2013, 2016) support database availability groups. Rather than traditional Exchange ...


1

Is there a way to tell exchange to let email for this account to just go through to the web email server as opposed to trying to route it itself? Not easily, no. Even though no mailbox or object exists with that email address Exchange is still authoritative for that email domain. Upon not finding a mailbox or an object with that email address Exchange will ...


1

unfortunately that isn't possible. But you could create a second virtual SMTP server, just not using the same port and local IP. You'd need to either use a different SMTP port instead of 25 or bind the two virtual SMTP servers to different local network cards / IPs.


1

It's been a while since I used SBS 2003, but I believe if you demote it, you will still be violating the licence (because it's not a DC and doesn't hold the FSMOs), and therefore you will still have the issue of the server trying to shut itself down. Best recommendation would be to install Exchange server elsewhere and migrate mailboxes and public folders to ...


1

For exchange 2007 there are some obscure limitations on the server based on tcp port limits. For exchange 2010 there is a limit on the amount of connections a single user can have and the default limit is 10. However it doesn't really matter what kind of connection it is, mobile or otherwise. Exchange can throttle the amount of concurrent client-connections ...


1

What you are referring to is a second SMTP domain. It can be done in Exchange 2003/SBS 2003. It's been quite a while since I've done one, but I believe the below is accurate. The articles should walk you through it, but I've added some of the steps since SF doesn't like "link answers". See the KB article here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/289833 and ...


1

Yes. This is a little complicated, so bear with me. First, your customer opens an account with a stock broker. Then he starty buying Microsoft stock. Lots of it. Once he reaches 5% of the company, he can then ask for a seat on the board and raise the issue - he should be prepared to make a takeover offer to buy Microsoft if them are not cooperative. This ...


1

Adding the TXT or CNAME record is just a way to prove to Google that you really control the DNS for domain name you're trying to use. The thought process is: "We'll give you this unique string of bits to put in DNS, if it shows up then you must have control of that domain's DNS." Either method is fine to use. Some DNS providers don't allow you to use one ...


1

No, definitely not. Some more characters to fill the answer requirement


1

Update: If the server is truly removed from the environment, you may just need to click the link at the bottom of the Orginization Health tab that says Last Updated: timestamp. Click here to access the latest data. If not, then my original answer still applies, but you will need to update this data after removing the server. Original Answer: In order to ...


1

You'll need to go into Exchange System Manager and setup your relay that way. After you're in ESM expand the organization, then the servers, then expand the server name, and finally expand Protocols. Select Relay. The rest is basically making sure that only the IP of the server/program your company uses is allowed to relay is set right; meaning only allow ...


1

First of all, you should upgrade your Exchange Server to a newer version, that probably already helps a lot. Second thing, you should make sure that you don't have more items in a folder than the recommended limit. The limits are: Exchange 2000/2003: 5,000 Exchange 2007: 20,000 Exchange 2010: 100,000 Source If you are over this limit, you should move ...


1

I don't believe this is possible, at least not back with Exchange 2003. Maybe 2013 has some functionality around this with Powershell, but not back then. You can't simply change meeting organizers. At a minimum this "script" would have to find the meetings, catalog the meetings, then delete and recreate the meetings with the new organizer, which would in ...


1

Typical setup Email for someone@example.org goes to the server mentioned in DNS, the MailExchange (MX) record, under the domain example.org That email is carried by SMTP. If that entry in DNS is pointing to the Exchange server then incoming email is coming in via SMTP and you do not need popcon. It's also possible to have this kind of arrangement: DNS MX ...


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