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The du command in Terminal should work. Browse to the parent dir of the folder in question and try the below: du -d 1 -h (depth of 1 tells du to descend only one level (itself) and sum the contents of the child directories to calculate a size. -h provides the sizes in human-readable format.


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Restrictive file permissions do not prevent a user from enumerating other users and their home directories. getent passwd from glibc will list users including their home directories. The underlying getpwent() function can also be called by a program. To fully prevent any user from listing other user's home directories, isolate the user. As in, give them ...


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If your system is degenerate (such as /bin/sh is init) the ancient behavior reappears. halt will see that it doesn't know the runlevel and can't command a runlevel change and actually issue a halt system call and bring the system down immediately. However, sync is synchronous now (and has been since at least 2000) and you don't need to run it multiple times. ...


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I deduce you are using ext3 or ext4 as the file system. If so, you can mount it with the errors=panic option and configure watchdog to reboot your system in case a panic happen. While more complex than roelvanmeer's answer (which I upvoted), it has the added bonus of working for all panic-level kernel crash. As suggested by NikitaKipriyanov, setting the ...


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Maybe not a very pretty solution, but my first thought would be to run a command from cron every minute: test -w / || reboot


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Answering my own question, perhaps helpful for others. I've found xfs has xfs_quota utility where you can set up projects which monitor disk usage for any given folder. First, the xfs partition must be (re)mounted with the prjquota flag enabled: mount -o prjquota /dev/vdb1 /mnt/backups. Optionally, this flag can be added to /etc/fstab to ensure it's mounted ...


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Copy on write does not give you integrity of the filesystem. Assuming that you meant filesystem journalling, which does give you filesystem integrity, then you should almost certainly still use Write Ahead Logging. Write Ahead Logging in PostgreSQL gives you database integrity at the transaction level, typically increases performance, as well as giving point ...


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