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38

I've found that when I've had to tune for lower latency vs throughput, I've tuned nr_requests down from it's default (to as low as 32). The idea being smaller batches equals lower latency. Also for read_ahead_kb I've found that for sequential reads/writes, increasing this value offers better throughput, but I've found that this option really depends on ...


25

I've covered SSD interoperability and compatibility issues with HP servers several times here. Check these posts: HP D2700 enclosure and SSDs. Will any SSD work? Are there any SAN vendors that allow third party drives? So, the move from G6 and G7 HP ProLiants to the Gen8 variants forced a disk carrier form-factor change. HP went to the SmartDrive carrier ...


17

Interesting issue... So the HP RAID controller driver from around 2001 to ~2009 was the CCISS driver. There was a transition to the HPSA driver at some point, moving the Smart Array controller support back into the regular SCSI subsystem versus the dedicated block driver... HP servers from the G1 to G5 era used the CCISS driver. On newer operating systems (...


16

While the other answer here beings up some points, your specific issues are due to platform limitations and OS configuration: You're throughput-limited by the use of consumer SATA SSDs on an HP Smart Array P410 RAID controller. SATA disks run at 3.0Gbps (3G) on these controllers rather than 6.0Gbps (6G). So that's a barrier that impacts the read speeds of ...


15

My favorite example: This can be run from the shell or within the tool. hpacucli ctrl all show config (use hpacucli.exe for Windows) Or hpacucli ctrl all show config detail But, if you have the HP Management Agents installed anyway, you should have realtime monitoring of RAID status pushing back to email alerts or an external monitoring system. Either ...


15

This depends slightly on the operating systems you're running on the servers, but in general, it is possible to obtain alerts from HP ProLiant servers and Smart Array RAID controllers. The full driver and software support listing for your DL380 G5 systems is listed here. SNMP and a monitoring solution is the best approach... But you can augment that with ...


15

I totally don't want to discount the rest of your question, but the path of least resistance is to replace the failed disks. When dealing with legacy equipment, there may be a temptation to devise an esoteric or clever workaround, but your immediate goal is to keep this particular hardware running in the current and stable state until you can migrate ...


13

The RAID rebuild on HP servers is automatic if you're using a Smart Array RAID controller. Assuming a Smart Array P410 array controller, all you'll need to do is insert the replacement hard disk to initiate the rebuild. The details of how the Smart Array handles drive failures and rebuilds are described here in the HP Smart Array controller technology brief....


13

The Storageworks MSA60 enclosure has a "soft" power button. It does not power on automatically. When the power cables are connected, the unit defaults to a standby state. Here's the rear of the HP StorageWorks MSA60 enclosure... On the right side of the rear of the unit, there's a module next to the right power supply which has a soft power button in the ...


13

As ewwhite points out they'll physically fit into the servers with the correct disk caddies but you don't have to look far online to read the tales of woe that people run into when using non-HP disks with HP controllers as HP-branded disks have specific firmware on them that extend the functionality, reliability and in some cases performance of their disks. ...


13

Okay. This is an interesting question, as there are a number of options available to you. Some concepts to clarify and understand, as they relate to this situation: Perceptions of "speed" or "fast". RAID controller performance. SAS topology. Benchmarking a system and/or identifying bottlenecks. In order to get the maximum performance, we really need ...


13

Please don't do this. If you're going to run ZFS on Linux, do it bare metal without a virtualization layer. All-on-one virtualization and ZFS solutions are cute, but it's not worth the effort in production. As far as drives are concerned, you can use SATA disks on an HP Smart Array controller as well as the LSI 9211-8i controller. In a ZFS configuration, ...


12

Oh dear, where to begin? There is so much involved, and you need a good understanding of everything. Just throwing a bunch of disks against a RAID controller won't yield the results you're looking for. This can't be easily answered. But at least, here is a list of stuff you have to look at: Does the Controller even have the throughput needed? (-> ...


12

This is an HP ProLiant server with a Smart Array P420i RAID controller. My immediate advice is to not change any of the default configuration settings unless you have a very specific reason to... In short, don't worry about it. The concept of sectors/tracks in the context of this controller and disk geometry isn't very useful here. Lots of layers of ...


11

All modern Linux distributions should see the disk array using the HPSA driver module (older distros would see the outgoing CCISS driver). The reason you're not seeing any disks is that you may not have configured a logical drive. You can do this in the BIOS by following the prompts when the HP Smart Array controller shows up (usually, press F8). Create a ...


11

You will be constrained by the slowest speed and smallest size for disks in the same RAID group. Since you're talking about having three separate mirrors, this doesn't apply to you. Each mirrored pair is a separate array/group/whatever-you-want-to-call-it. You'll end up with three logical volumes, two with 500GB and the other with 1TB with no performance hit ...


11

This is a hard lesson. You really should not be managing HP logical drives from the BIOS utility. It's far too inflexible and isn't Operating System aware, like the Online Array Configuration Utilities for Windows and Linux. Those tools show the logical drive mount points and lock specific actions if the logical drive is mounted. Furthermore, the BIOS ...


11

So let me summarise, correct me if I've missed something out; You're running unsupported disks You're running an unsupported OS You pulled a disk for fun You've lost your array Is that right? If so then you want to know how to debug this right? This site is for professional sysadmins, not amateurs, it says so in the top line of our FAQ (which you read ...


11

You really can't monitor the array status that well on your platform. One tacky option is cciss_vol_status, but it's far from the mainstream approach. This is kind of a bad combination of hardware and software. FreeBSD ProLiant support is a bit Meh... Okay, it's actually worse than that... So a few things to consider: ZFS is a software RAID and volume ...


11

This is not true. The DL360 G7 server uses an HP Smart Array P410 controller. This uses the standard CCISS or HPSA drivers that have been in the Linux kernel for ages. You won't need anything special in order to install Ubuntu on this platform. Be sure to create a Logical Drive in the BIOS RAID utility first, though. Otherwise, your Ubuntu installation won'...


10

Thank you for updating the post with more information. You're running on ProLiant systems, so there's a certain amount of work required to optimize your controller and I/O situation. Also, your XFS mounts are using the default options. Remember that you're using a different driver between these operating systems. The EL5 server has cciss, while the EL6 ...


10

Your system is definitely underperforming based on your hardware specifications. I loaded the sysbench utility on a couple of idle HP ProLiant DL380 G6/G7 servers running CentOS 5/6 to check their performance. These are normal fixed partitions instead of LVM. (I don't typically use LVM, because of the flexibility offered by HP Smart Array controllers) The ...


10

Assuming you're on a recent firmware revision for the DL320 G6 server. You're going to have to pay close attention to the POST messages in order to catch the RAID controller's ORCA utility prompt. The "Sea of Sensors" POST routine takes awhile from the first screen prompt (on a warm-boot) to step through RAM checks and to register the sensors. After the ...


10

This is a bug in some of the controllers that collide with iLO2 and there's a SIMPLE solution to that which always works. Once you see the "Press any key to view Option ROM messages" message, click F8 and keep clicking it until you enter the iLO configuration screen. Yes - iLO, not the P410. Then, click exit immediately and start pressing F8 once it gets ...


10

Upgrading the HP SAS expander is possible using Linux and a SAS HBA. Note: Flashing firmware to a SAS expander will likely not work when the expander is connected to a SAS RAID controller because that controller might hide all devices behind it from the OS. An example of a SAS HBA is Supermicro SAS2LP-MV8. In case you haven't got Linux, you can use a Linux ...


10

It depends on how the drive failed. 72GB 10k disks haven't been manufactured for years, so I'd suspect that your disks are at least 6 years old... possibly 9 years... You may have a mechanical problem with the disk. The server you're talking about is an HP ProLiant DL360 G5. They were sold from 2005-2008. Running RAID 0 is a calculated risk. Your data was ...


10

Being able to run fstrim on the / partitions would be the best solution however with they way your ESXi is configured it would not be possible. You need to be able to enable discards on both the VM and the storage device. Trying to reduce to size of a partition or logical volume with the xfs filesystem cannot be done this is a known bug with fedora. If you ...


10

You probably have an heavily punctured array, which cause an early "planned death" of the replacement disk due to failed stripe reconstruction. You can read more information here and here The solution is to backup, destroy the array, recreate it and restore from backup. Next time avoid using a RAID5 array with such big drives. I strongly suggest using ...


9

HP has a good write-up of what the differences are here: http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c02677069/c02677069.pdf (PDF) High points: Puts devices in the standard /dev namespace, which you already noticed. Modernized interaction with the SCSI layer in newer kernels. hpsa is a SCSI driver, cciss is a block-driver. This will change ...


9

It should also be noted, just because I just killed 7TB of data by following LapTop006's, well, lets call it "personal opinion", that a P400 Controller would expose unassigned disks as JBOD, that this is nothing but a guess, and it is false, at least for my P400. There may be other controllers behaving like LapTop006 said, the P400 does not, at least not ...


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