17

Interesting issue... So the HP RAID controller driver from around 2001 to ~2009 was the CCISS driver. There was a transition to the HPSA driver at some point, moving the Smart Array controller support back into the regular SCSI subsystem versus the dedicated block driver... HP servers from the G1 to G5 era used the CCISS driver. On newer operating systems (...


16

While the other answer here beings up some points, your specific issues are due to platform limitations and OS configuration: You're throughput-limited by the use of consumer SATA SSDs on an HP Smart Array P410 RAID controller. SATA disks run at 3.0Gbps (3G) on these controllers rather than 6.0Gbps (6G). So that's a barrier that impacts the read speeds of ...


15

I totally don't want to discount the rest of your question, but the path of least resistance is to replace the failed disks. When dealing with legacy equipment, there may be a temptation to devise an esoteric or clever workaround, but your immediate goal is to keep this particular hardware running in the current and stable state until you can migrate ...


13

Please don't do this. If you're going to run ZFS on Linux, do it bare metal without a virtualization layer. All-on-one virtualization and ZFS solutions are cute, but it's not worth the effort in production. As far as drives are concerned, you can use SATA disks on an HP Smart Array controller as well as the LSI 9211-8i controller. In a ZFS configuration, ...


13

This is an HP ProLiant server with a Smart Array P420i RAID controller. My immediate advice is to not change any of the default configuration settings unless you have a very specific reason to... In short, don't worry about it. The concept of sectors/tracks in the context of this controller and disk geometry isn't very useful here. Lots of layers of ...


12

Oh dear, where to begin? There is so much involved, and you need a good understanding of everything. Just throwing a bunch of disks against a RAID controller won't yield the results you're looking for. This can't be easily answered. But at least, here is a list of stuff you have to look at: Does the Controller even have the throughput needed? (-> ...


12

This is not true. The DL360 G7 server uses an HP Smart Array P410 controller. This uses the standard CCISS or HPSA drivers that have been in the Linux kernel for ages. You won't need anything special in order to install Ubuntu on this platform. Be sure to create a Logical Drive in the BIOS RAID utility first, though. Otherwise, your Ubuntu installation won'...


11

It should also be noted, just because I just killed 7TB of data by following LapTop006's, well, lets call it "personal opinion", that a P400 Controller would expose unassigned disks as JBOD, that this is nothing but a guess, and it is false, at least for my P400. There may be other controllers behaving like LapTop006 said, the P400 does not, at least not ...


11

You really can't monitor the array status that well on your platform. One tacky option is cciss_vol_status, but it's far from the mainstream approach. This is kind of a bad combination of hardware and software. FreeBSD ProLiant support is a bit Meh... Okay, it's actually worse than that... So a few things to consider: ZFS is a software RAID and volume ...


11

Upgrading the HP SAS expander is possible using Linux and a SAS HBA. Note: Flashing firmware to a SAS expander will likely not work when the expander is connected to a SAS RAID controller because that controller might hide all devices behind it from the OS. An example of a SAS HBA is Supermicro SAS2LP-MV8. In case you haven't got Linux, you can use a Linux ...


10

This is a bit crazy... A Smart Array P600 PCI-X RAID controller (circa 2005)?!? 25 disks? RAID 5? Is this an HP MSA70 enclosure? Is probably not the HP D2700? "Ready for Rebuild" is about the worst array status message you can receive on an HP ProLiant system. This indicates that the logicaldrive can't finish its rebuild because there's trouble reading from ...


10

It depends on how the drive failed. 72GB 10k disks haven't been manufactured for years, so I'd suspect that your disks are at least 6 years old... possibly 9 years... You may have a mechanical problem with the disk. The server you're talking about is an HP ProLiant DL360 G5. They were sold from 2005-2008. Running RAID 0 is a calculated risk. Your data was ...


10

Being able to run fstrim on the / partitions would be the best solution however with they way your ESXi is configured it would not be possible. You need to be able to enable discards on both the VM and the storage device. Trying to reduce to size of a partition or logical volume with the xfs filesystem cannot be done this is a known bug with fedora. If you ...


10

You probably have an heavily punctured array, which cause an early "planned death" of the replacement disk due to failed stripe reconstruction. You can read more information here and here The solution is to backup, destroy the array, recreate it and restore from backup. Next time avoid using a RAID5 array with such big drives. I strongly suggest using ...


9

The tool you should be using today is hpssacli. The older hpacucli utility doesn't work on current-generation ProLiant servers. In case you don't have hpssacli, the support download bundle for your server is here (if you're not already using the HP ESXi build). Also, RAID6 for 4 disks doesn't make sense. Do RAID 1+0 ~ # /opt/hp/hpacucli/bin/hpacucli HP ...


9

You're not one for the scientific method, are you? Different operating systems. Different platform (server versus workstation). Different CPU architecture. Unsupported SSD on the RAID controller. Raw SATA versus a disk connected to a RAID controller backplane. The assumption that a RAID controller is supposed to be "faster". Misconfigured settings on the ...


9

You're not supposed to do this. The HP Smart Array P410i RAID controller is not compatible with every SSD. You can't just toss some consumer drives into the server and expect them to work. HP protects/guards against that by restricting third-party drive use in their servers. The drives have NOT failed, but they definitely are not meant to be used with that ...


8

I blame HP for convincing people to buy the ProLiant DL360e/DL380e series of servers. The storage controller is a big compromise on those servers. Here, you basically installed onto one of the two disks. The HP Dynamic Smart Array needs a binary driver to really function... See this Red Hat knowledge base article. You'll have to slipstream it into the ...


8

According to the screenshot below, you have an "Unconfigured Disk"... This means that the drive needs to be configured on your HP Smart Array B120i RAID controller before it can be used by an operating system or VMware ESXi. You can perform this from the ESXi command line using the hpssacli command located in /opt/hp/hpssacli/bin/hpssacli on your server... ...


8

Wow... there's a lot to address here. Disk performance isn't just about throughput. There's the notion of IOPS and latency and service times to contend with. Most workloads are a bit random in nature, so 25 enterprise disks in an array will always trump 4 disks from an IOPS perspective. hdparm is not the right tool to benchmark enterprise storage. Look ...


8

There are a few issues here. You don't have any controller write cache or a battery-backed or flash-capacitor. The HP Smart Array P410 controller is limited in IOPS capacity. It's not a good match for SSDs. Using SATA drives on a Smart Array P410 causes the interface speed to downshift to 3.0Gbps instead of 6.0Gbps. Please try with RAID 1+0. RAID5 is not ...


8

The short answer is that you can't really do what you're thinking. Instead of the normal RAID controller -> backplane connections, the kit you've described does this: HP supports a "chipset SATA" mode while would allow the use of ONE drive bay out of the eight drive bays on the backplane. This option comes with many caveats and is not a normal use of this ...


7

There no way to pass raw disks through to an OS while connected to an HP server backplane that's linked to an onboard RAID controller (the Smart Array P410 in your case). You must create a "Logical Drive" in order to present a block device to ESXi. To see RAW disks in this situation, you'd need a dedicated SAS HBA like an LSI 9211-8i to be connected to the ...


7

So storage blades are interesting... The HP D2220sb storage blade actually creates a PCI connection to the blade server over the enclosure's backplane. The storage blade has an embedded Smart Array P420i RAID controller, so no mezzanine cards are needed in the individual blade server. Install the BL460c Gen8 server. Place the storage blade in the adjacent ...


7

This is a bit nuts... That's too many disks for a RAID5. It's offset by the fact that you have two hot-spare drives, but damn!! However, you've already expanded the underlying Array, but not the Logical Drive. Remember, the "Array" is the physical grouping of disks. The "Logical Drive" is what you assign RAID level to. You can have multiple Logical Drives ...


7

You can make this work with some effort. Normally, I'd be all like, "Use HP drives", but the fact that you're using a G7 ProLiant means that many of the firmware restrictions don't apply from either side. Gen8 ProLiant servers are a totally different story. So, in this case, it's just a formatting issue. The AX4 disks are formatted in 520-byte sectors, ...


7

Your HDD performance are greatly boosted by the RAID card's DRAM write back cache, which basically transforms random writes in sequential ones. I suppose that your P840 has at least 2 GB of write back cache, which totally absorbs CrystalDisk's workload and cached a good chunk of the MySQL one. While is true that even your SSDs should benefit from the ...


7

I don't participate here as much as I used to, but I see a problem with what you've done. HP Smart Array controllers can accommodate SAS and SATA disks. However, you cannot have an array comprised of a mix of SAS and SATA disks. HP never marketed a 2TB 2.5" SAS disk, so I'm assuming the 2TB drives you have are SATA. The 146GB disks are SAS. So... pulling ...


6

Using Consumer grade disks in server grade HW is possible though not recomended if you are going to use the support from the vendor. They will bitch like hell why you replaced the perfectly supported drives with unsuported such. Aside from that there is no problem to do it and backblaze proved it (http://www.getoto.net/noise/2013/11/12/how-long-do-disk-...


6

This could be a VMware issue or a locking problem on the virtual disk. Can you capture the full error message? Do other virtual machines power on without problems? Despite that, it appears you have a physical storage issue, too. Here's what the HP Smart Array P410 configuration output on a DL180 G6 looks like: physicaldrive 1I:1:1 (port 1I:box 1:bay ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible