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env TZ=GMT date '+%a, %d %b %Y %T %Z' %T is equivalent to %H:%M:%S. %Z is replaced by the time zone name. The solution by @brad, DATE=$(date -u +%a,\ %d\ %b\ %Y\ %H:%M:%S\ GMT), would be incorrect if the time zone setting of your system is not GMT. For example: env TZ=Asia/Taipei date -u +%a,\ %d\ %b\ %Y\ %H:%M:%S\ GMT %H:%M:%S would be GMT+8 while the ...


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Google offers several types of load balancers. You should use the TCP Load Balancer and not the HTTP Load Balancer.


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I couldn't get the answer from @timmmmmy to work, but it pointed me to the map documentation and this worked for me: map $request_method $upstream_location { PUT example.com:8081; POST example.com:8081; PATCH example.com:8081; default example.com:8082; } server { location / { proxy_pass https://$upstream_location; } }


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It took some time, but I found a solution. Basically, you have to use Lua to get the request body, send it to a unix socket, read the line and send it back as server response. Use nginx with lua like this: First install nginx-extras Load modules ndk_http_module and ngx_http_lua_module (in this order) in nginx.conf like this: load_module modules/...


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I've not used the other two, but corkscrew connects to the proxy and uses the CONNECT HTTP verb to request the proxy connects to the remote resource without doing any further HTTP protocol. Any traffic sent/received after the connection is established is transmitted as-is. This is exactly the same as how regular HTTP clients behind a proxy connect to SSL/...


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To peform htaccess redirect to HTTPS, you need to Install SSL certificate. After successful installation of SSL, the first step involves editing of .htaccess file. You can do it via FTP or cPanel File Manager. The second step involves htaccess redirect to https in Apache or NGINX. Visit https://serverguy.com/security/redirect-http-to-https/ for complete ...


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If your webserver initiates the outgoing request on port 80, stopping your nginx webserver doesn't necessarily help because many services can initiate an outgoing connection on port 80. You won't get any more detail with tcpdump because it's on the ethernet level. You need to find the source of the problem. Most of the time, when you see such a high ...


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You can use SSHUTTLE, heres a tutorial on how to use it, https://etherarp.net/sshuttle-a-vpn-for-the-lazy/ heres a tutorial how to set it up to work as a service, https://medium.com/@mike.reider/using-sshuttle-as-a-service-bec2684a65fe


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Apache has that functionality built in; just increase the log level to trace7 or trace8: LogLevel trace8 Note that this will dump a lot of data. You have been warned.


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