11

Ctrl+Alt+Pause should get you out of full-screen mode when using hyperV in full screen mode inside a remote desktop session.


8

I found this thread, which enlightened me to the /force parameter. The command that ultimately worked was: netdom remove /d:DomainThatNoLongerExist.COM HYPERVComputerName /FORCE


7

Remove the shadow copies from the guest. That will do it! vssadmin delete shadows /all


7

Are there any issues with Hyper-V (on Server 2008 r2) if the host is formatted as GPT? EUFI/EFI based systems can boot to a GPT disk, all can use GPT disks as secondary disks. Someone out there has tried this... Yes, yes they have.


7

You only have one DC? Get a second DC. Seriously. Promote a file server running on a 486 in the basement if you have to. Stop running with a single DC. Now. Otherwise, it should be fine to reboot them in any order, as long as things are all up and happily running between rebooting one and the next. Also, regarding your virtualization queries: Always keep ...


7

200 Mailboxes falls under the "small installation" category. The performance of Exchange 2013 running as virtual machine is perfectly fine on modern hardware. I no longer have physical Exchange servers as a result. Having enough RAM is key. Disk I/O and CPU needs are extremely low. Microsoft's own Exchange 2013 hardware guidelines are reasonable and outline ...


6

None of the suggested key combinations bring me out of hyperv fullscreen mode. However, I found a two key sequence workaround. Pressing ctrl+alt+left-arrow causes the notebook to rotate display -90 degrees and releasing fullscreen mode. Quickly follow with ctrl+alt+up-arrow to restore normal mode. You are now out of fullscreen mode.


6

The Intel Xeon X5150 is a dual-core CPU that was used in systems from mid-2006 until 2007. It ran in systems that could accommodate two CPU sockets, so at most, you can have four usable cores if both sockets are populated. If only one CPU socket is populated, you won't be able to create a virtual machine with more than two cores. In a VMWare, Hyper-V or ...


6

Poweroff your VM, backup the VHD, and run another virtual machine (I use SystemRescueCD since it's small and fast) that has the ext4 partition available to it, i.e., a HD for SysRescue (but don't mount it!). From the SysRescue VM, run 'zerofree' on the ext4 partition, poweroff that VM, and then use your Administration Website to compact the VHD.


6

Exchange Server 2013 runs very well in a virtual environment. Have a look at Best Practices for Virtualizing & Managing Exchange 2013 for some, ahem, best practices. Flashy whitepapers aside, though, 200 mailboxes could well be served by a VM with a meager quantity of RAM and JBOD storage. (I'm a little squeamish to give specific numbers here, because ...


5

I am aware that this is an old question, but I encountered the same issue and wasted so much time getting it resolved that I thought I would share the solution that worked for me. I found the solution to my problem here: http://invendows.wordpress.com/2008/03/06/network-issue-with-hyper-v/ The solution in my situation was to disable TCP Offloading on the ...


5

While Craig's answer will definitely work, I discovered the following also works: Hit the reset button and immediately click into the Virtual Machine Connection window so that it grabs the keystrokes. Frantically hammer both shift keys and the ESC key while until you get a GRUB menu. Apparently holding down the shift key or pressing it in a less manic ...


5

Windows 8 Server Hyper-V 3 has provided the "live migration without shared storage" feature. http://www.jamesbannanit.com/2012/03/windows-8-server-hyper-v-live-migration-without-shared-storage/


5

it depends on how your VM's are configured. if this is just a stand-alone hyper-v server with no clustering or management from SCVMM, then when you reboot the host, the guests will do what they are configured to do. in the settings for the individual VM's, there is a section called "Automatic Start Action" and "Automatic Stop Action" that controls what ...


5

Take Hyper-V out of the question and the answer becomes obvious. Configure Windows Firewall on the guest (or a hardware firewall between the clients and the server) to allow only those ports. Configuring this has nothing to do with Hyper-V.


5

In order to cluster Hyper-V virtual machines, you need the VMs to be on a shared storage which can be accessed by all cluster nodes; since you are using an iSCSI SAN, this should already be your case. You need to set up the cluster and then configure the VMs as cluster resources. In order to do this, you'll need to shut down the VMs, but if they are already ...


5

1518 is the maximum frame size for "old school" 802.3 Ethernet. If frame checksum sequence is offloaded to the NIC then 1514 is the maximum frame size (since the 4-byte frame checksum will be added by the NIC). 1500 is the IP maximum transmit unit (MTU) for Ethernet, since 1500 bytes of payload are available in a 1518 byte Ethernet frame. Setting the NIC's ...


5

I have finally got it working! The goal of this is to help people out who are starting at the beginning of setting a Domains time. In this example all Servers, Primary Domain Controller (PDC), other Domain Controllers (DC) and other servers are running Windows 2008 R2 and are virtualized with Hyper-V. First things first you will read to disable the 'Time ...


5

There are lots of libraries and GUI tools to manage Hyper-V as suggested by TomTom and also includes the MMC Hyper-V Manager Microsoft provides. However, all these tools assumes a particular set up before they can actually connect and be useful. If you are really messed up and have only the server core installation, in a different domain, with a expired ...


5

I don't have a Windows Server 2008 R2 failover cluster to check at the moment but deleting the VM from Failover Cluster Manager should remove it as a clustered role/service but leave the VM intact. It should be the equivalent to the Remove option in a Windows Server 2012 Failover Cluster.


5

We have submitted a ticket into Microsoft. After 4 days of their tech support, we closed the ticket. Final answer, NO Hyper-V Manager on Windows 10 will not communicate to Server 2008 r2.


4

I locked myself out of the server by making the nic exclusively usable by the VM. To make the NIC also usable by the management OS you can use the following in PowerShell: Set-VMSwitch -Name "YourName" -AllowManagementOS 1 If you do not know the names of your virtual switches, you can use: Get-VMSwitch


4

Since I just ran into this, and it's not clear from the documentation, when using wusa /uninstall /kb:<kb number> make sure you're using the actual number from the KB, not the number and the KB. Wrong: wusa /uninstall /kb:KB123456 Right: wusa /uninstall /kb:123456


4

This should be possible. You will simply create a single-node cluster. When you're ready to create the second node, you'll expand the cluster via the Failover Cluster snap-in. There are a couple of things you should be mindful of: When adding the second node, Windows will try to get you to run the analyzer. If you do, it can potentially cause an ...


4

Each vCPU counts as a single CPU from within the guest OS, which means that guest OSes and the applications inside them, each physical core is a single CPU. Virtualization abstracts the physical hardware, so all the guest OS and any application inside it can see are the values the hypervisor passes to them. In your case, the hypervisor tells the OS you ...


4

Check to make sure that the VM and the physical machine don't have the same MAC address or the same IP address set. This sounds suspiciously like either a duplicate IP issue, or an accidental arp poisoning.


4

You can export your VM. Shutdown the VM Export the VM to an external drive Copy to the new Server Import the VM in Hyper-V on the new Server Boot the VM on the new Server Test and verify it's working before removing the initial VM. Here's an article with some more information/walk through.


4

In HyperV 2008 R2 you need to use an iSCSI disk as your shared storage. This is configured in the guests same as you would a physical machine, not in Hyper-V. Hyper-V on Server 2012 allows you to use a shared vhdx instead. If you don't already have iSCSI storage available you might want to look at upgrading to get that new feature.


3

In the interest of Internet search consolidation: Eventually found this link thas an approach that has worked when HyperV compact did not: https://fiddley.wordpress.com/2014/01/27/dynamically-expanding-vhd-not-compacting-in-hyper-v/ In Administrative command prompt, run DISKPART At the DISKPART command prompt select vdisk File=”I:\path\to\your.vhd” ...


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