25

Roughly this: Become a LIR (Local Internet Registry) Obtain and set up your AS (Autonomous System) Decide what address you'd like to use (e.g. 7.7.7.7) Find out who currently has it assigned: whois 7.7.7.7. Ok, it's US army, try a different one: whois 77.77.77.77 - cool someone from Iran. Contact them and offer them loads of money for transferring the 77.77....


5

Explanation We can determine the public IP address through DNS with dig (the DNS lookup utility from BIND), this lets us try out both UDP (with the +notcp option) and TCP (+tcp option), leaving only ICMP behind. However, we can try sending all these queries to multiple independent destination IPv4 and IPv6 addresses, making it more likely that the load-...


5

Do not use MAC address for security or authentication purposes. Those addresses can be trivially changed. Instead, implement a (or use your existing) network access control solution. These use some combination of actual authentication, device and application fingerprinting, user agents, and integration with other means of device management. Wireless APs ...


3

They are PRIVATE. If you wire a house, who decides how many doors you can have? The IP address spaces that are NOT USED ON THE INTERNET are defined in an RFC. Private addresses are part of that (actually THE part of it) and are in there. You can use whatever you want from that. There is no authority. They are not existing on the internet. Obviously if you ...


3

Normally you should really only have one device on the network assigning IP addresses in a given range, If you can't do this then your WAPs need to be configured to have different none overlapping ranges. e.g. if you whole network is using 192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0 as it's subnet then the WAPs should have: WAP 1 192.168.1.1-50 WAP 2 192.168.1.51-100 WAP 3 ...


3

why is it resolving to a private IP ? Your question seems to be based on the assumption that a DNS record cannot resolve to a "private" IP for some reason. There's no basis for the assumption, so the answer is "because that's what the person who created the record wants it to resolve to".


3

For IPv6 you can assign whole prefix to a single machine (e.g. /92 which would mean that the machine could handle a whole IPv4 Internet's worth of addresses). By this I means a single "address" entry on an interface for the whole range, not multiple addresses on an interface or multiple interfaces. Even if the existing cloud providers won't give you a range ...


2

A 32 digit base 16 number is easier for most people to understand than an 8 digit base 65,536 number. Hex is relatively compact, a power of 2, and already used in other contexts like UUIDs, hash functions, and memory addresses. Bitmasking CIDR notation is easy when staying on 4 bit boundaries = one hex digit. 2001:db8:1234::/48 2001:db8:1234:5600::/56 ...


2

That is just a DNS RR (reverse record) resolved from IP to that name. There is no way to really map resolved RR back to original IP as the records are independent. Moreover the RR can contain non-existing domain name. So you can't rely on RR to obtain information on the logged on users IP. To check back real IP without DNS resolution, you can use last -a -i ...


2

And here I'll save you hours of research: The trick is to use the API provided by the control node in the cluster (which if you are experimenting, is probably the minikube virtualbox vm or a docker container). You can access it as follows: First create a serviceaccount with which you will gain access to the kubernetes control plane API (the name pod-service-...


2

Your email (POP3/IMAP/SMTP) works with MX records, not A records. So if you change the A records, the only thing of concern would be making sure the A record for 'mail' points to the correct email web interface.


1

Implement IPv6. Assign hosts IP addresses out of your global assignment. Create AAAA records in DNS for each host, perhaps labgpu01.example.net. Allow desired services such as ssh in firewalls.


1

Generally you're best using your cloud service firewalls, as that way traffic you want to reject never makes it to your server. If it makes it to your server it takes up resources to reject, and if you're not fully patched it increases the chance your server is compromised. I don't know much about Google Cloud, but a search brings up Google Cloud VPC ...


1

Please read this article, there you could find more about name resolution in Windows. Below answer to your question: Host name resolution generally uses the following sequence: The client checks to see if the name queried is its own. The client then searches a local Hosts file, a list of IP address and names stored on the local computer. ...


1

change www cname "@" to example.com make and A record for example.com that points to the new IP A example.com. 167.99.XX.XX cname www example.com.


1

A bash one-liner to get the "default IP address" of your machine: ip -o route get 1.1.1.1 | cut -d " " -f 7 And if you need it in Python 3: def get_default_ip(): output = subprocess.check_output(["ip", "-o", "route", "get", "1.1.1.1"], universal_newlines=True) return output.split(" ")[6]


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