45

Seeing that there is not even a single comment, I decided to continue my research and finally pieced the configuration together. OS: Ubuntu 16.04 systemd: 229-1ubuntu2 systemd-journal-remote: 229-1ubuntu2 Upload server configuration This one is actually simple, online example are correct and only need to touch one configuration file. Use following ...


33

This was a doc bug that was closed when the typo in the man page was updated. The bug report led to the following comments in the code: We don't actually accept patterns, hence don't claim so. As a workaround, you may be able to use grep as suggested in the comments to your question. Something like this: journalctl | grep sshd


24

It could be because you are trying to review the journal since the last boot, which seems likely to be the case inside a docker image. On Ubuntu 16.04, the journal storage defaults to being in-memory. You can change the default to be persistent by opening /etc/systemd/journald.conf and changing the Storage= line from auto to persistent. You may need to ...


20

The reason this happens is because of defaults on the size of journald files stored. There is more detail about this in the docs. It's worth reading the whole section I have linked to, but the defaults work like so: journald will use 10% of the disk or 4G, whichever is smaller. journald will leave free 15% of the disk or 4G, whichever is larger. For ...


10

Forwarding messages to legacy software like syslog gives you nothing but overhead. Instead you can implement both models using native journald features. Push model: (log source) systemd-journal-upload -> systemd-journal-remote (log collector) Pull model: (log source) systemd-journal-gatewayd <- systemd-journal-remote (log collector) The arrow shows ...


10

You can install a syslog daemon such as rsyslog (the default on Red Hat derived systems). This will log all journal entries in a more backward compatible manner, and of course you can specify a custom log for whatever you wish. If you don't need logs exported in real time, you can use journalctl --since as some people have mentioned. You can run it daily at ...


9

Systemd has a Unix domain socket you can log to: global log /dev/log local0 info Then systemctl restart haproxy to make the changes take effect.


7

The solution is to change group ownership and add a sticky bit to the parent folder before the .journal files are created. chown :systemd-journal /var/log/journal/f9afeb75a5a382dce8269887a67fbf58 chmod g+s /var/log/journal/f9afeb75a5a382dce8269887a67fbf58


7

I do realize this question is a little dated, but it is one of the first search results on Google. That and the --json option does not seem to work for me and does not show up in the man pages. I looked at the man page for journalctl and there is an option named: --no-tail which will just output the date directly to std where it can be piped into another ...


7

You are using less at that point, but ^C is behaving differently due to how it was invoked by journalctl. The flags that journalctl passes to less include the following defaults: FRSXMK Of these, I think the "K" option applies here: -K or --quit-on-intr Causes less to exit immediately (with status 2) when an interrupt character (usually ...


7

There are two reasons. First, as @Mella mentioned, there is the difference between the current-log vs all-logs. Second, as documented in man journalctl, there a number of output formats. You were measuring the size of the most-compact/least-detailed. To see maximal data in the systemd journal, use: journactl --output=verbose In my case, the compact ...


6

After renaming the hostname, deleting & recreating /etc/machine-id by running systemd-machine-id-setup and rebooting to apply these, systemd-journald came back to life!


6

You can override anything in a unit with drop-ins, files that systemd automatically reads from an include directory if it exists. For instance, if you create a directory /etc/systemd/system/myservice.service.d and then a file within that directory, directives in that file will override whatever is in the system shipped unit. For example, /etc/systemd/...


6

Just figured this out. You can use any systemd journal field as filter by specifying <FIELD_NAME>=<VALUE>. The following fields are useful for this question: _COMM=, _EXE=, _CMDLINE= The name, the executable path, and the command line of the process the journal entry originates from. So in order to filter on the command name, use ...


5

This is happening probably because of rate limiting in journalctl conf. Check RateLimitInterval and RateLimitBurst in /etc/systemd/journald.conf file.


5

CoreOS ships with a set of default rules and is designed to be configured via the filesystem in /etc/audit/rules.d/. As you are trying to play with it interactively what you will want to do is clear the audit rules first as there is a rule at /etc/audit/rules.d/99-default.rules that silences all remaining rules. Simply run audit -D to clear the rules and ...


5

Ok so I only have EL systems to hand but I asked a friend who as a Debian 8 system and the answer is broadly the same. For Debian using cron (substitute crond for EL) systemctl status cron systemctl status cron cron.service - Regular background program processing daemon Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/cron.service; enabled) Active: active (...


5

They are huge, because its kind of a bug: As it is indicated upstream and hence known to the developers of journald, the used in the binary log format is not at all very great (yet?). They are huge, because maybe the Compression is not activated There also is a option in /etc/systemd/journald.conf named Compress=yes, which might not be active on your ...


5

well... almost 2 years had gone by and finally found the solution for the issue. If anyone has the same issue please try the steps below. syslogd version rsyslogd 8.24.0-38.el7 The issue was related to the imjournal module. I've remove all the entries of the rsyslog.conf related to imjournal and switched the OmitLocalLogging to off After that I've ...


5

From Red hat documentation, using the journal The Journal is a component of systemd that is responsible for viewing and management of log files. It can be used in parallel, or in place of a traditional syslog daemon, such as rsyslogd. From Red had documentation, rsyslog journal interaction By default, rsyslogd uses the imjournal module as a default input ...


4

The following output options display priority (and facility), but in a different format: journalctl -o verbose journalctl -o json (and json-pretty) journalctl -o export


4

I encountered a similar issue. As explained here, it turns out that you can't redirect output directly within ExecStartPre, ExecStart, or ExecStopPost commands - systemd will interpret the > or >> as arguments. The solution is to execute your command using sh -c. There's also one other issue I ran into when trying to use the date command in my ...


4

There is no official support, but there is an open issue to get it added. It turns out there are a few plugins that shim in this support, notably logstash-input-journald.


4

The AVC indicates that the file being read doesn't have an SELinux label. This can happen if SELinux was disabled when the file was created, or if it is created on a filesystem that isn't SELinux-capable (e.g. vfat). If someone had disabled and re-enabed SELinux, then you should be able to fix the problem (and possibly many others) by relabeling the ...


4

Nothing in the docs in man journald.conf promises to make the log files as large as SystemMaxFileSize=. The docs only promise not to exceed that limit. From an amateur reading of the C source code, my interpretation is that there is a "minimum file size", but that is only 512k, so that shouldn't be in play here. There is also "FILE_SIZE_INCREASE", which is ...


3

No. journalctl is a query tool, not a formatting tool. It has some formatting options, but it is not log4j2. DigitalOcean has a nice writeup: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-use-journalctl-to-view-and-manipulate-systemd-logs journalctl json output piped to jq may be sufficient.


3

You can use systemd-journal-remote to convert like this journalctl -S @1500253701 -U @1500256701 -o export > foo.export systemd-journal-remote --output=foo.journald foo.export journalctl --file=foo.journald This information was added to the man page of journalctl in systemd 233, see commit.


3

journald rotates its own files, so it's safe to copy the old files (which always have an @ in the filename) elsewhere, compress them, or do whatever you want with them. If it's necessary to look into them, journalctl can be pointed at specific journal files with the --file command line option. You should also see journald.conf for options to limit journald's ...


2

Well, I am not running Centos 7, but found this issue. I did these steps, but did not help, at least on Ubuntu 18.04 I got a message that Hint: You are currently not seeing messages from other users and the system. Users in groups 'adm', 'systemd-journal' can see all messages. Pass -q to turn off this notice. So I did sudo usermod -a -G systemd-...


2

The fix appears to be coming in https://github.com/systemd/systemd/pull/4970


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible