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7

Those four ports on the back of that modem are merely switch ports. You should be just fine adding another "dumb" switch to gain more WAN ports.


5

You should be able to add a loopback adapter to the machine to enable the functionality you're looking for: Start / hdwwiz.exe Choose "Install the hardware that I manually select from a list (Advanced)" Choose "Network adapters" Choose "Microsoft" in the "Manufacturer" pane and "Microsoft Loopback Adapter" in the "Network Adapter:" pane Complete the ...


3

You're fighting physics here, and you're not going to win. Various regulatory bodies limit the Tx power of wifi gear, so there's not a whole lot of room for improvement there. Remember that RF power drops off according to the Inverse-Square Law, so even if you were able to double the Tx power of your AP, it's going to make very, very little difference in the ...


3

Connect the Airtel to the switch first. Then configure the Airtel with a free IP address on the same subnet as the other hosts and then change the default router on the three desired hosts which need to connect through the Airtel router. If you use DHCP on the LAN, make sure you have DHCP configured (disabled) correctly before connecting the Airtel device ...


3

From man minicom -C, --capturefile=FILE filename. Open capture file at startup. So, simply do this: #!/usr/bash echo "begin" timeout 60s minicom Cisco -d Boston -C log.txt


3

I'm going to assume these are Sun systems. As I mentioned in my comment there are a BUNCH of serial port types on Sun hardware. Some of these are REALLY freaky! As Chris pointed out, your first server's serial port is labeled. You don't tell us what model this is, but since it's just one port I'm betting it's a combined (A+B) port like the SLC has. If you ...


2

Log into the wireless router and disable its DHCP server. Connect the wireless router to one of the cable modem/router's LAN ports. Do not use the wireless router's Internet/WAN port. (It's not connected to the Internet, it's connected to the LAN.) You now have one big happy LAN produced by the Comcast modem/router. You may need to reboot devices connected ...


2

No, it won't work. Dialup is painful enough as it is that making it worse with a VoIP hop is a non-starter. To provide usable dialup service, you need a clean, digital 56Kbps path from your digital modem to the end user's local DAC.


2

It's unclear what version of minicom you're working with, but I went and had a look at the source for the current version, 2.7. (I'm kinda sorry I looked-- it's burning my eyes. What an ugly bunch of C code...) It looks like the prompt you're talking about is invoked from dial.c in two different places-- lines 384 and 598. The line 384 invocation happens ...


2

Looking at the manal for the dg834gt, you should be able to do this as follows - Set up the router "as normal" so that the ADSL (PPPoA) connection works. Set the LAN range as 192.168.0.x - make sure both your DG834 and DD-WRT router are in the same range AND HAVE STATIC IP ADDRESSES ASSIGNED. Set up a static route with your subnet with the gateway being the ...


2

Ideally (ie pedantically) speaking, your modem is always be in bridge mode, but many "modems" also have a router built in to handle NAT etc for you. It's also common enough to have that handled in a separate device, leaving the modem to do what it does best. As you've mentioned double natting, I'm assuming you have a dedicated router. I'm also going to ...


2

My employee are using a GSM modem called: HT910G We are running it on our OP5 system and works great with CentOS 6.x and Linux 2.6 Here's the manual: https://kb.op5.com/download/attachments/6193522/Technical%20Description%20HT910%20G%201.1.pdf?version=1&modificationDate=1395759338000&api=v2 When we migrated the system from bare metal to VMware we ...


2

Issue is solved Hylafax suggest as a default setting to set the modem as a Class 1 modem. I've tested a setting as a Class 2.0 modem and now I can receive fax


2

You need the read the manual for your modem You can often connect to a modem that is in bridge mode following the user manual's instructions to verify it's settings. Try connecting it to a PC/laptop and if you get the address 192.168.1.100 try connecting to http://192.168.1.1 (my last modem was like that). There might be an admin interface there. Once you ...


2

So after searching long and hard, I finally added "+ipv6" to my ppp options file, and everything started working. Now to figure out and understand why that option is required!


2

You could try unloading & re-loading the kernel module responsible for the modem's /dev/ttyUSB* device(s). If that does not help, you might try uhubctl: a program that can control the per-port power switches of (some) USB hubs, including some root hubs. If your set-up allows controlling the power of the USB port the modem is connected to, switching it ...


2

This is a common problem with old phone devices (your modem) and newer telephone company hardware: the type of hardware provided by the telephone company doesn't provide enough ringing voltage for the modem to recognize an incoming call. But first things first, if you haven't tried the working fax machine on that same phone line that the modem is connected ...


2

The feature you need is called WDS. Its implementation is, however, specific to each vendor, so having two different brands won't help. If WDS fails, try your luck with setting up two wireless modes at the same time, namely Client and AP. The radio will switch between them rapidly acting like two machines. A sure-fire way is having two cheap routers at ...


2

You had an IP conflict: both routers had the same IP. After you changed your modem's IP, you placed it in another network: a netmask of 255.255.255.0 indicates that all devices in the network have the first 3 numbers (or 24 bits) of the address equal. The ARP tables won't detect it, since they have only one entry per IP. You must change the IP of your modem ...


2

No, per definition. The Modem is classically NOT PART OF THE IP SPACE. It is a modulator/demodulator working on some lower level transforming a bitstream into a wire level format. Whatever is behind a modem will be assigned the IP address. If the modem also works as router, then it obviously get an IP Address + does NAT (normally) for the home, but it is not ...


1

I assume by 'connected' you mean it is basically a switch? Connect a different client to each end, give the clients IPs from the same subnet, check if you can ping client B from client A.


1

Yes, bridged mode + PPPoE on a pfSense box should work fine. One notable caveat to test though is that some ISPs who use PPPoE have an MTU blackhole and don't set PPP MTU (some Cisco client equipment fails to negotiate the PPP session if the far end tries to set MTU) and also don't themselves clamp TCP MSS to work around this. Setting your PPP MTU manually ...


1

is it possible to configure my device using the ISP's static ip, and have it route correctly thru the dhcp enabled (and dynamic ip configured) router? No. to ask it another way, is there a way for a device connected to the modem thru the router to bypass (or communicate thru) the router's gateway and communicate directly with the modem? Again, ...


1

Check you Netmask, it should probably be /30 (and I think monowall defaults* to /31). Comcast should have given you three numbers (well, not counting the two DNS servers): Your usable IP address The gateway IP The Netmask to use For single static IP accounts, this is usually 255.255.255.252 (or /30). For reference, see http://www.subnet-calculator.com/...


1

Let assume this is your setup: ROUTER >----> SNWL X1 (WAN) >----> SNWL X0 (LAN) >----> YOUR PC By default, SNWL LAN interface (X0) has IP 192.168.168.168. You can set your PC with 192.168.168.10/24, gateway 192.168.168.168. Now, pointing your browser at https://192.168.168.168 you will see SonicWall webUI auth page. You can login with user: "admin" and ...


1

Are there any side effects or problems that could come of placing a modem into bridge mode in order to allow for easier access to internal services? Well, that's probably something you should talk with your ISP about. In general, though, it's a great idea. Double-NAT is evil.


1

The remote PC needs a default gateway in order to access anything beyond it's local network or for anything beyond it's local network to access it. There's no way for you to remotely connect to the remote PC in order to set it's Default Gateway without it having a Default Gateway set, so you're in a bit of a catch-22. If you can access another computer on ...


1

I was going to say I didn't know of any such program, but 20 seconds of googling turned up tcpser


1

I don't have a modem, but I tested with my pendrive to connect it direct with the container. My device on the host: brw-rw---- 1 root plugdev 8, 16 Jan 29 15:17 /dev/sdb My container config: ... lxc.cgroup.devices.allow = b 8:16 rwm lxc.mount.entry = /dev/sdb /var/lib/lxc/multi2/rootfs/dev/sdb none bind 0 0 But when try to start it, I ...


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