5

Snmpbulkwalk initiates internal server repetitions to walk through mib tree. Server does not respond untill it retrives "max-repetitions" number of variables or end of mib tree is reached. Retrieving some variables may demand valuable time. Important note: snmpwalk walks trough a requested subtree exactly but snmpbulkwalk may retreive additional variables (...


5

From the manpage for free(1): cache Memory used by the page cache and slabs (Cached and Slab in /proc/meminfo) free includes slab allocation in cache; UCD-SNMP-MIB doesn't. If you add in the slab allocation, you get: UCD-SNMP-MIB::memCached.0 + slab = 44238560 + 23961488 = 68200048 KB which is much closer to what free ...


5

There's nothing stopping you from using another enterprise's OIDs, but that would be inconsiderate. You're supposed to request your own Private Enterprise Number and use that in building your OIDs/MIBs.


5

I've resolve this issue : vim /etc/snmp/snmptrapd.conf: disableAuthorization yes


3

I found that I couldn't list anything for LM-SENSORS-MIB until I relaxed the permissions in /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf by adding the following: rocommunity public localhost After restarting snmpd service snmpd restart the following commands finally worked: snmpwalk -v2c -c public localhost . | grep 2021.13.16.2.1.3.6 > iso.3.6.1.2.1.25.4.2.1.5.25917 = ...


3

Nothing - In the same way that you can also use 8.8.8.8 as your IP if you don't connect to the internet. It's just a convention to prevent clashes between everyone saying 'ok .1 is mine!' If you want to be able access their oids and yours together, you'll obviously run into issues if you don't play nicely.


2

So can anyone say how to do community string indexing for non-cisco switches? This is how to poll Q-BRIDGE-MIB for mac-addresses from the only non-Cisco I have, a DLink DGS-3200. I'm not using [community@vlan] for non-Cisco switches. Indexing BRIDGE-MIB with [community@vlan] only applies to Ciscos. I expect any non-Cisco switch, which supports Q-BRIDGE-...


2

There are IncludeDir and IncludeFile options available from RHEL/Centos 6.5: https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/6.5_Technical_Notes/net-snmp.html


2

After digging through NetSNMP code a bit, it looks like it processes the config file line-by-line, and appends to the agent address data if it finds something. Thus, you are able to add multiple lines in the config file with multiple agent addresses: agentAddress udp:127.0.0.1:29032 agentAddress udp:127.0.0.1:22032 I was able to test this on my own agent ...


2

All companies that set up a privately maintained MIB (usually called an "enterprise" MIB) are assigned a MIB designation number. The Dell enterprise MIB assignment number from IANA is 1.3.6.1.4.1.674 (not 1.3.6.1.4.1.181), and looking up the DRAC SNMP traps available on this MIB from http://www.oidview.com/mibs/674/IDRAC-MIB-SMIv2.html shows the trap message ...


2

When you receive a SNMP trap, the daemon snmptrapd will forward this trap to an external program (typicaly your script). snmptrapd will add some args (IP address, hostname, notification, OID) which will be sent in the standard input of your script. An example of script which receive the trap, this script is from http://net-snmp.sourceforge.net/wiki/index....


2

Playing around with some settings and Im getting some success. The CISCO-MEMORY-POOL PoolFree/Used works if I change the type to "gauge" and table to "false". Makes sense. But CISCO-PROCESS-MIB cpu returns as a percentage it looks like. Still cant get that one. Here is how snmpwalk returns the OIDs: [root@NMS-srv2 ~]# snmpwalk -v 2c -c rbhome spine1 ...


2

snmpget will send a single packet containing several OIDs (you can verify this using the -d option). So changing your command to use snmpget (and removing the -Cr1 option) will do what you want. Alternatively you could BULKGET IF-MIB::ifEntry which gives you more than you want. snmpbulkget (or rather the underlying GETBULK/GETNEXT) methods always return ...


2

Zabbix does exactly what you are asking for, and the good news is that it does it by default. Just add Template SNMP Interfaces template to your monitored network devices. You then should be able to see all the interfaces and also all kinds of graphs, such as traffic and operational status.


2

Having a Cisco MIB does not mean that your server will 'pretend' it is a Cisco device. the MIB only serves to describe the SNMP data hierarchy for the benefit of retrieving/viewing the data. It converts the OID numbers into text. If you'd like to monitor your Redhat server, you can snmpwalk the OIDs that are available and see what it offers, but I'd ...


1

First of all quote from RFC3411 For example, the managed object type ifDescr [RFC2863], is defined as the description of a network interface. To identify the description of device-X's first network interface, four pieces of information are needed: the snmpEngineID of the SNMP entity which provides access to the management information at device-X, the ...


1

As per net-snmp-libs version: 5.7.2-43 memAvailReal now returns the available memory instead of the free memory. This package should be available in RHEL/CentOS 7.7 More information: https://access.redhat.com/errata/RHBA-2019:2239 https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1250060 Update: This change was reverted: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=...


1

I reckon you want to install the php5-snmp package. FWIW, TurnKey Linux is based on Debian. TurnKey v14.x = Debian Jessie. FYI I discovered that by doing a package search (scroll about halfway down to "Search package directories") for "php snmp" in "oldstable" (i.e. Jessie). If you'd done a search from the commandline, you probably would have found ...


1

Do you get an error when running snmptrapd -f -Lo Your error is probably something like this Warning: no access control information configured. (Config search path: /usr/local/etc/snmp:/usr/local/share/snmp:/usr/local/lib/snmp:/root/.snmp) This receiver will *NOT* accept any incoming notifications. It might be that the conf file you edited is not on ...


1

It took a long time to figure this out to be able to use snmptrapd without needing the engineID. This works with a brand new Cisco Nexus switch (nx-os) and hoping this will help someone else: format2 %V\n% Agent Address: %A \n Agent Hostname: %B \n Date: %H - %J - %K - %L - %M - %Y \n Enterprise OID: %N \n Trap Type: %W \n Trap Sub-Type: %q \n Community/...


1

And it turns out that my snmpd daemon runs a number of (shell) commands - specified in the extensible section of snmpd.conf. One of those (for reasons yet to be determined) started to become wedged now and then. The stupid snmpd daemon got stucked reading from that command and the whole shebang timed out. The way I found out may be of interest. 1) find ...


1

edit your snmpd.conf and add rwuser MD5DESUser stop snmpd and edit your persistent snmpd.conf and add createUser MD5DESUser MD5 "The Net-SNMP Demo Password" DES And finally, here is an authenticated and encrypted request: snmpgetnext -v 3 -n "" -u MD5DESUser -a MD5 -A "The Net-SNMP Demo Password" -x DES -X "The Net-SNMP Demo Password" -l authPriv ...


1

I'd suggest that you can modify the systemd script rather than doing it manually on the command line. For example, the current snmpd.service located in /usr/lib/systemd/system/ contains the following: [Unit] Description=Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) Daemon. After=syslog.target network.target [Service] Type=notify Environment=OPTIONS="-LS0-6d" ...


1

Apparently, the only way to specify multiple interfaces for version Net-SNMP 5.7.2.1 is by specifying multiple IP addresses at the command line for snmpd. I've yet to find a workable solution of specifying multiple interfaces using the snmpd configuration (snmpd.conf) file approach. # /usr/sbin/snmpd 127.0.0.1 192.168.1.1 It is there (at the command line) ...


1

I discovered the problem by enabling all debug options for snmptrapd with -Dall: root@snmptrapper:~# snmptrapd -f -C -c /root/testsnmptrapd.conf -Le -Dall The issue turned out to be a bad context set in ~/.snmp/snmp.conf. I had created this file, early in the initial SNMPv3 setup. root@client:~# cat ~/.snmp/snmp.conf defContext none defVersion 3 ...


1

I found a solution. I installed this package: sudo apt-get install snmp-mibs-downloader After installing, run this command: download-mibs It should download all necessary mibs.


1

I think Red Cricket has the right idea. Net::SNMP::Interfaces->new will return undef if something went wrong. Can you try executing the following? #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use Net::SNMP::Interfaces; use Data::Dumper; my $interfaces = Net::SNMP::Interfaces->new( Hostname => 'localhost', Community => 'public' ) or die "...


1

as "work around" (even though it really not), one can use -c or -w instead of -r, as -r seems to have some sort of bug. # ./check_snmp --help | grep -E 'critical|warning' -w, --warning=THRESHOLD(s) -c, --critical=THRESHOLD(s) # example: # /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_snmp --hostname=X.X.X.X --community=X --protocol=X --oid=ifOperStatus.6 -c1 SNMP ...


1

First, load the custom MIB(s) on your management station (the one you are using to query the device). You should follow this guide. In short: (1) obtain custom MIB(s) for your device from manufacturer (2) put the following lines in snmp.conf file (e.g. /usr/local/share/snmp.conf) or in a personal file (e.g. $HOME/.snmp/snmp.conf): mibs +ALL Then, ...


1

The snmpd.conf file should contain a few other parameters by default, among them is the community "public" which has access to the system info MIB (OID 1.3.6.1.2.1.1 ). This should work for any version of SNMP. You can enable broader access to other MIBs, restrict by IP etc with very little effort.


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