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15

Backups serve two functions. First and foremost, they're there to allow you to recover your data if it becomes unavailable. In this sense, snapshots are not backups. If you lose data on the filer (volume deletion, storage corruption, firmware error, etc.), all snapshots for that data are gone as well. Secondly, and far more commonly, backups are used to ...


10

The simplest way is cat /sys/block/<sdX>/device/queue_depth


8

They are a backup, yes. I've personally used them in place of daily incrementals before, but we still did weekly fulls to tape. They protect quite well from any non-netapp (systems accessing volumes) user or admin errors or problems. They do not protect from catastrophic hardware failures of the netapp itself. My understanding is that SnapMirror does copy ...


7

Mainly you want to make sure your VM's will be OK with no disk IO. Installing the VMware tools will take care of this with 4.x and newer. You also want to set the right settings on your ESX hosts related to timeouts, these are detailed on the netapp site in TR-3749 Really it does not matter which protocol you are using for cluster fail overs since the ...


7

It's a hard disk with a FC interface. Nope, you probably can't just arbitrarily replace one of them with a disk with a different interface, and different IO characteristics, especially in a storage array. But ask your vendor to be certain, or consult their documentation!


5

Disk fragmentation in VMs is just a fact of life for the reason you've described. In most workloads, it's not something that needs to be worried about. If you have workloads that do massive sequential IO, this might be a cause of poor performance, but not on random read/write workloads. There's a reason VMs are sometimes referred to as I/O blenders :)


5

quota resize (or the equivalent action in one of the GUIs) forces the quota service to scan the volume and apply any changes made to /etc/quotas. It's not actually resizing your volume. Until you execute a quota resize (or alternatively disable and reenable the quota service), no changes made to the quota definitions will be applied. Also notable: during the ...


5

Theoretically max throughput of NetApp stack will be 9600 MB/sec. NetApp supports 240 HDDs per stack or 96 SSDs per stack. But it's not a system limit. You can have several stacks in one system. It depends on controllers model. SAS 6G one lane gives 600 MB/sec. But one SAS 6G port utilises 4 lanes. With NetApp you use 2 ports on each controller for one ...


5

First and foremost, before to mangle with storage, you should be 100% sure that your bottleneck is really related to disk/IO configuration. It this is the case, an iSCSI share can be faster than a NFS one, but in specific scenario only (small random read/write packets). SQL servers can be one of these scenarios, so if you are sure that your problem is ...


4

There is a utility on the NetApp website called 'secedit' that helps create a 'security definition file: http://support.netapp.com/NOW/download/tools/secedit/download.shtml A basic file looks like this: cb56f6f4 1,0,"/vol/vol_name/qtree_name/subdirectory",0,"D:(A;CIOI;0x1f01ff;;;Everyone)" This will set 'Everyone / Full Control' as an explicit ACL on the ...


4

I would modify your antivirus policies to not scan files shared over the network. You could potentially have a dozen clients trying to AV scan the same file across the network simultaneously. So in Windows 2000, 2003, Windows XP, Vista, and 2008, the default behavior is this: Network security: Allow Local System to use computer identity for NTLM Disabled: ...


4

I think, it was just an I/O timeout. I had such issues with Linux VMs on remote NFS datastore. NFS was just too slow, and some of our Linux VMs switched their disks into read-only mode (and therefore stopped responding). Probably, during resize your NFS datastore was overloaded and this caused issues. Do Linux VMs work fine after reboot? To avoid such ...


4

The autocomplete list is stored as an hidden message w/ the subject "IPM.Configuration.Autocomplete" in the Inbox folder of the user's mailbox. You can't get at it with Outlook, but other tools will let you. Call me heavy-handed, but I think I'd grab a copy of MFCMAPI and use it to backup an then delete the autocomplete cache. (As an aside: MFCMAPI is just ...


4

The VMware compatibility guide includes a comprehensive storage section that lists the supported storage solutions and provides details on what features are available for each listing. You can also filter the search results by the features. After locating a listing you can drill-down into it to see the details. You should be looking for arrays that support ...


4

Yes. vStorage APIs for Array Integration http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1021976 Check the HCL for Storage. OmniOS isn't a listed partner. NetApp is.


4

I've not heard that iSCSI is better than NFS for SQL VMs, however if you do elect to create them, I would create the datastore on the ESX level, not install an iSCSI initiator on the VM. One thing you need to be careful about is thin provisioning on the Netapp. The way they do block devices is different. You can find yourself with an offline LUN if you ...


4

First things first: If you want to improve the performance of a VM you have to know where the bottleneck is. Improving storage performance doesn't help you if your environment lacks e.g. CPU performance. I don't think changing your storage protocol from NFS to iSCSI will help you much. There are dozens of other parameters that influence your storage ...


4

What does 'sysstat -x' say, if that's essentially zero across the board (I'd try it a few times over a few minutes) then it's clear.


4

To check iSCSI, use iscsi initiator show and iscsi session show. If you see anything, figure out what it belongs to and remove its access. To check CIFS, rather than timestamps, you'd want to use the command cifs sessions. To check NFS, if it's v3 and you don't have sessions, you could use nfsstat to check stats- that allows you to zero your stats and ...


4

You can do it a few ways- first, check a snapmirror status -l command will tell you the completion time for the last snapmirror as well as the current progress in KB and current lag (which you can use to calculate the current speed). If you have all your traffic on a specific interface, you can use ifstat to measure its current speed, but that's measured in ...


4

You should use snapshot autodelete. Without it, snapshots that exceed the reserve don't get deleted by default. Snapshot autodelete can be configured to behave several ways. The one I use is to set the trigger to "snap_reserve", meaning it'll delete any snapshots that exceed the reserve. We use snapshots as more convenient backups, but we still take backups ...


4

I would advise seeing whether your backup software can initiate and manage SMTape backups from your secondary site. Even if it can't, you can use it through the Netapp CLI to back up the entire volume. If your backup software supports it, you could use it to do full and incremental backups which would include all snapshots visible on the snapmirror ...


4

I think that your problem is that the cacheing that's going on is not specifically NFS-related. Here's what I see on the network when I do an md5sum of a small NFS-mounted file for the second time in five seconds: 12:29:27.615255 IP6 2a02:xxxx:6049:11:76d4:35ff:fe8d:39ec.1003 > 2a02:xxxx:6049:11:7271:bcff:feac:445a.2049: Flags [P.], seq 3028:3236, ack ...


4

Configuring and adding multipath to existing iSCSI disk should not somehow affect data on it. You need to disconnect iSCSI target -> configure multipath on CenOS site -> and then reconnect iSCSI disk using multiple paths.


3

I've come to the end of the run on this one, and now know why it's happening. In summary: Since Windows 7/2008 the default behaviour for 'LocalSystem' on a client machine changed. Where before it would use a 'null' login, it uses machine accounts for NTLM. Because we are going between two AD forests, Kerberos isn't being used. This is by design. http://...


3

if you take here 2 and not 0 as in the example cb56f6f4 1,0,"/vol/vol_name/qtree_name/subdirectory",2,... then you can replace all permissions by only the new one. !Be carefully with it you will really remove all other permissions in all Subdirectorys! Normal you will need this option only if you have interrupted inheritance in subfolders.


3

For Netapp, split IO generally means bad alignment. If your MBR offsets the VM's disk blocks so that they span the borders of Netapp blocks, then each time you do IO on a single block from the OS, you're having to hit the storage twice.


3

Multiple I/O's are always less efficient. Whether it manifests as a performance issue would be something you need to determine. Some files by definition are large and have data organized randomly, so some split I/O's would be expected. Split I/O's can also be a symptom of another underlying bottleneck, such as disk queue length. You may want to ensure ...


3

Shutdown - Perform steps on both heads of the filer Cf status Cf disable Cf status Cifs terminate sysstsat -x lun stats -i 10 If the numbers are not close to zero determine why there is traffic. Halt Shows halt on the front Use powerswitch to turn them all off. Powerup Turn on the disk shelves first ….wait 1 minute Turn on the heads (Ones with LCD'...


3

My solution was a bit more complicated. I was able establish a JBOD on my NetApp DS14MK4 (14 x 450GB) using an HP Qlogic QLE2462 HBA on an Ubuntu 16.10 box using the following commands (some settings will be different based on your hard drive type and sizes, so adjust accordingly): Enable Qlogic HBA BIOS using on system boot-up (Disabled by default) Use ...


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