69

To delete all network authentication C:\> net use * /d To view current network connection C:\> net use IMPORTANT NOTE I tested in Windows 7 SP1 64 Bits, 100% WORK After run the command, you need to go to task manager delete the explorer.exe , then reopen the application again. To open the application, go to RUN, enter explorer.exe Now you are ...


43

I know this is old, but in case anyone reads this in the future.... The next time this occurs I have found the best way to get rid of the credentials is to open an elevated command prompt and type in: net use \\server\share /delete then type in: klist purge I tried it with both command individually and they do not work alone. You have to first remove ...


41

It seems like you've missed an important part of net use before you ruled it out as a solution. You don't need to specify a drive letter with it. net use \\server\share /user:test testpassword will work just fine. You don't need to specify a drive letter. This will allow access to that UNC path under the specified credentials. Once you have the UNC path ...


29

PowerShell fully supports UNC paths; you can use them everywhere a directory or file name would be expected: Set-Location \\servername\sharename Get-ChildItem \\servername\sharename Copy-Item \\servername1\sharename1\filename.ext \\servername2\sharename2 Remove-Item \\servername\sharename\foldername\filename.ext However, you need proper access rights to ...


27

You can create an SSH tunnel through machine2 then in another session connect to the tunnel. For example, open two CLI sessions on machine1. In the first session run the following: MACHINE1$ ssh -L 2022:MACHINE3:22 <user>@MACHINE2 In the second session run the following: MACHINE1 $ ssh -p 2022 <user>@localhost What's happening with the ...


25

You could add a second IP address to the system and point the DNS name at that new IP address. The server will still talk on both IPs, so none of your users will be disrupted, but you will know that anyone connecting on the old IP is not using DNS.


23

If the accepted answer gives you this error; System error 1219 has occurred. Multiple connections to a server or shared resource by the same user, using more than one user name, are not allowed. Disconnect all previous connections to the server or shared resource and try again. You'll need to first remove the existing shares. If you're in a hurry, this ...


23

This apparently possible, according to this StackOverflow post. Before posting the content of the answer, however, can I suggest that you're over-complicating this? In situations like this where some crappy piece of code needs a user logged on to run (like Domino server, grumble) I've created a service account that's to always be logged in on a given server, ...


22

In my case, enabling the Guest account and adding Everyone did not help (with a share on an older box with Windows Server 2008 SP2 in a domain and a Windows Server 2012 R2 machine from outside of the domain). After following the excellent guide posted by Nikola Radosavljevic, anonymous access finally worked in my scenario. Summary of steps: Adding ...


22

It works! On Windows by default only administrators can create symlinks. When I start VirtualBox as administrator, I can create symlinks without any problems. In order to be able to create symlinks without starting the VB as admin, you need to set this permission for your user/usergroup. Here is a short how-to. The only problem is -- I have not found a ...


18

sync and async have different meanings for the two different situations. sync in the client context makes all writes to the file be committed to the server. async causes all writes to the file to not be transmitted to the server immediately, usually only when the file is closed. So another host opening the same file is not going to see the changes made by ...


15

I had exactly the same issue but with Samba 4 exports and Windows 7 clients. It is definitely client side error. After some thorough troubleshooting, I simply added the registry key and it worked like a charm after hitting the F5 button once. Only had to add this registry key: DirectoryCacheLifetime[DWORD] = 0 HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\...


14

The DSC Local Configuration Manager runs as the local SYSTEM account, not your user account. It therefore won't be able to access network resources unless it is given explicit permissions. There are two possible situations. Either the share is on the same machine as the DSC configuration is being applied to (let's call this machine A) or the share is on a ...


13

Go to the control panel -> User accounts -> click on your name -> to the left click on "credentials" (or manage your credentials). All the used network credentials will be there.


12

Shares are listed in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Shares registry key, you can delete the entries there, after a backup of the key (source)


12

This was the key option to set to resolve this issue: [global] map to guest = bad user


12

The network will keep working until your DHCP leases expire. After the leases expire devices may switch to RFC 3927 addresses. But those addresses are not predictable so you'd have to rely on MDNS to find them, and they are unlikely to work between a given pair of devices until both have switched from DHCP assigned addresses to RFC 3927 addresses. On the ...


12

Your thoughts are essentially what I do, and I've had a lot of success in managing things that way in complicated environments. The solution to both of the question is that you create resource groups that are tied to the folders/shares. You don't delete the empty groups at all, the groups exist for as long as the folder or share exists, not for as long as ...


11

The manual page flock(2) had been out of date for a long time, but has since been updated to say (emphasis mine): Since Linux 2.6.12, NFS clients support flock() locks by emulating them as byte-range locks on the entire file. This means that fcntl(2) and flock() locks do interact with one another over NFS. Since Linux 2.6.37, the kernel supports ...


11

You may be able to clear the cached credentials by using the Credential Manager in the Control Panel. Try browse into the Control Panel, enter "Credential Manager" into the search bar on the top right, then click on the "Credential Manager" result. You may find your cached credentials under the "Windows Credentials" section, if so you can click "Remove from ...


11

You need to create a trust between the two domains. At a minimum, a one-way trust where the domain that your computer is in must trust the other domain will need to be created.


11

This really piqued my interest. I was able to replicate your findings in my lab with the same pattern of results that you describe. I used Procmon to to try to see what changes are made and almost gave up until I saw the following: That shows lsass.exe (Local Security Authority) writing to the local SAM and making a change(s) to the built-in Guest account (...


11

There's a much easier method, non-destructive, which targets the actual Desktop.ini entry responsible for this behaviour. Go to: Group Policy -> User Configuration -> Preferences -> Windows Settings -> Ini Files Create a new Ini File entry, with the following settings: Action: Delete File Path: %homeshare%\desktop.ini Section Name: .ShellClassInfo ...


11

I would tend to think of these as different environments.


10

Robocopy supports resuming copying on error with the /Z switch. You can also specify number of retries and the amount of time between them with the /r and /w switches. I personally think sneakernet is the best tool for copying huge files. Barring that, I've had success with using something like 7zip to split the file into smaller pieces, robocopy /Z them, ...


9

I've just spent an incredible amount of time similarly debugging my server and have come down to the realization that the share and the directory being shared cannot have the same name. I have no idea why. I hope someone else stumbles across this earlier in their process than I did.


9

The following should do what you want. C:\> net use \\server\share /d C:\> net use \\server\ipc$ /d


9

If you don't have Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\System\Logon\Always wait for the network at computer startup and logon configured in your GPO, it's possible that your computer boots and you log in with cached credentials before the NIC is up and has obtained an address. Then, by the time you get around to opening Explorer, you've got an ...


8

Assuming that your machines are on a domain, processes running as the SYSTEM account will access the network using the computer account. When adding the account to the share permissions, ensure that you have 'Computers' selected in the Object types and specify SERVER-NAME as the user name.


8

Here are the assumptions I am making for the answer I will provide at the end. Assumptions: Your Windows 2003 Server is a member of an Active Directory Domain Your new Windows 2008 R2 Server will be a member of the same Active Directory Domain You will be doing the "swap" during off hours when you can ensure no one is connecting to the servers You will ...


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