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4

You can do it a few ways- first, check a snapmirror status -l command will tell you the completion time for the last snapmirror as well as the current progress in KB and current lag (which you can use to calculate the current speed). If you have all your traffic on a specific interface, you can use ifstat to measure its current speed, but that's measured in ...


2

Although I didn't find a solution for deleting files directly by using the CLI, I discovered some old snapshots. I was able to delete those old snapshots by using the CLI and that gave me some free space again on the LUN. How to delete snapshots by using the CLI I could find here: http://www.sysadmintutorials.com/tutorials/netapp/netapp-data-ontap-7-mode/...


2

Deleting files inside the server that uses the LUN will not necessarily free up space. VMWare leaves data from its deleted files all over the disk, dereferencing deleted files without actually removing or overwriting their data. If you're using a supported combination of VMWare and Netapp, you can use a special VAAI command to unreference scsi sectors that ...


1

I'd say use the cluster and node names and resolve them in DNS. DNS is an infrastructure service, and if it's unreliable then you have much bigger problems. (If your DNS has a dependency on your NetApp kit, then that might be an exception, but I'd suggest you don't want such a dependency to exist in the first place). I would, however, recommend including ...


1

For something like a monitoring tool, using DNS is fine and arguably preferred. That said, I'm not a NetApp expert, but if its anything like most storage, there's a cluster IP. and node IP's. I would direct your monitoring at both the cluster and individual nodes so you have a complete picture of the health status. One other note, as for mounting storage, ...


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