Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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6

DHCP options like new DNS servers are only applied when the lease is renewed. On Windows this happens at specific times: Halfway through the current lease When you run manually release and renew a lease using ipconfig /release followed by ipconfig /renew The most likely explanation is that these computers have leases that were more current than their ...


4

So… you're redirecting the real Google site and complaining when Google's browser notices that you've intercepted Google's website? Build Chrome from source and deploy that to your Enterprise. Or stop using OpenDNS.


3

We occasionally get questions about how one can selectively look up DNS domains at the client level, but it's simply not the job of the client to do that. Resolver libraries are dumb by design and expect the upstream recursor to do the heavy lifting for them. The only way to solve this problem at the client level is for the client itself to operate a DNS ...


2

Hijacking SSL and then serving an invalid certificate is a bad practice that people need to complain about whenever it happens. Based on your description it sounds like that sort of hijacking is exactly what OpenDNS is doing. The reason I think it is such a bad practice is that it may cause some users to think there exist legitimate reasons for hijacking ...


2

I'm with you 100% on this. Our company uses OpenDNS to block certain websites. YouTube.com is one of them. However, we also issue "bypass codes" to employees to get around a blocked site. Here's how this works: User browses to YouTube.com which auto redirects to SSL OpenDNS blocks youtube.com domain Chrome expects SSL from youtube.com, but the response ...


2

You are basically asking to break SSL security with your suggestion. Chrome has the feature called pinned certificates, where well-known website certificates are stored inside the browser. It means that whenever some other certificate than the one for the desired destination is presented, the browser gives out a warning about a Man in the middle attack. ...


2

Using OpenDNS will not block torrents. It will only block their ability to find new torrents online and add them to their queue. If they walk in with 5 torrents halfway done, and then link to the LAN via WiFi, wham, all of the torrents will resume and take all available bandwidth. A careful read of the OpenDNS website points this out. And if you think ...


1

This probably has to do with proximity more than anything else - a response time of 1ms indicates that the OpenDNS server you're hitting is extremely close to your system from a routing perspective. How do the DNS query times compare to the raw round trip times (ping)?


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