Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
47

from man debsums: debsums -ce List changed configuration files.


33

You need to enable the installation of i386 packages on your amd64 system: dpkg --add-architecture i386 apt-get update The ia32-libs-i386 package is only installable from the i386 repository, which becomes available with the above commands. See also: http://wiki.debian.org/Multiarch/Implementation


25

Here is the way which worked for me : Installed GMP with apt-get install php5-gmp Added extension=php_gmp.so to php.ini Et voilà ! phpinfo() sample : gmp gmp support enabled GMP version 4.3.2 It works fine here (Debian), so I suppose it will be ok for Ubuntu too.


18

https://pkgs.org/ provides a "Linux Packages Search" for several distributions, including CentOS 5–7.


15

They have lots of metadata. Use -qp to target the package file and --qf to specify which metadata you're interested in. $ rpm -qp /var/cache/yum/x86_64/16/fedora/packages/db4-4.8.30-3.fc15.i686.rpm --qf "%{name}: %{buildhost}\n" db4: x86-10.phx2.fedoraproject.org rpm --querytags will show you the metadata tags.


11

Sorry to necro, but while @naught101's answer was correct for modified files, it didn't help for added files. @Graeme's solution is nice, but depends on etckeeper; I don't want to modify the filesystem. find /etc -type f | grep -vFf <(debsums -e -r /etc | sed 's/[[:space:]]*OK$//') Find files in /etc/ that debsums does not report as valid. This means ...


11

If you want yum to behave like apt-get (not to update the metadata by each run), edit /etc/yum.conf and put there: metadata_expire=never or metadata_expire=7d in case you want to update the metadata after a week. If you run yum makecache, your metadata will be updated like by apt-get update in Debian. But keep in mind that if you use "never" in the ...


10

You should purge those packages. apt-get purge somepackage from man apt-get (APT-GET(8)) purge purge is identical to remove except that packages are removed and purged (any configuration files are deleted too). This is supposed to remove everything added by the package, such as config and data files. But I would assume it's possible that it ...


9

Synaptic -> Custom Filters -> Missing Recommends or aptitude search '~RBrecommends:~i' (thanks to http://blog.isonoe.net/post/2011/07/18/Debian-Tips-1%3A-Find-missing-recommended-packages)


9

The lowest. Seriously - the lowest standard ShockWatch label/sticker is 25G. A 25G shock is pretty severe (easily enough to dislodge boards, snap backplanes, etc). You should also label your packaging "FRAGILE" and instruct your recipients to refuse delivery if there is ANY evidence of damage to the box (a crushed corner is often the only outward sign of a ...


9

Short answer... Many large-scale and speed/latency sensitive applications run on standard Linux distributions. Red Hat, CentOS, Debian, Ubuntu... They all work well in the majority of cases. Most gains come from application tuning, standard kernel and OS optimizations and infrastructure. Gentoo may offer some optimizations, but open the door to more ...


8

There is the yum-plugin-priorities package. That allows you to give priority to configured repositories. See here: http://wiki.centos.org/PackageManagement/Yum/Priorities#head-6f52124e909c1691eb0c501ba38ae9202b66d6da Or you can exclude packages in /etc/yum.conf. http://linux.die.net/man/5/yum.conf: exclude List of packages to exclude from updates or ...


7

To check metadata on windows machine - you will need rpm utility. You can run RPM utility on Windows via Cygwin: http://cygwin.com/ - then from cygwin console you can run rpm -qip /path/file.rpm On centos - rpm -qip /path/file.rpm


6

The answer to this question suggests that automatically pulling the license info out of a single .deb package is non-trivial. I suspect there is no easy way to do what you want. Since the answer I linked to has been updated, I'll update mine too. This is beginning to change, as the debian/copyright file is now required to be machine-interpretable, so ...


6

I spent quite some time investigating this same issue and I reached the conclusion that the the "Provides" is ignored because xen-utils-4.0 has a versioned "Depends" on xen-utils-common. Quoting the Debian Policy Manual: A Provides field may not contain version numbers, and the version number of the concrete package which provides a particular virtual ...


6

At least for me, yum is bright enough that if I tell it to install something which is already installed, and for which an update is available, it will just apply the update instead. E.g.: [root@risby ~]# rpm -qa|grep openvpn openvpn-2.2.2-7.fc17.x86_64 openvpn is installed. [root@risby ~]# yum update [...] --> Running transaction check ---> Package ...


6

Install the package debsums. Run debsums -a to check all packages.


6

The performance difference will be in almost all cases minimal and not worthwhile. Good reasons to use source distributions (while rolling your own binary packages, as gentoo's bindist system allows) include: Deploying your own custom patches Customizing your kernel easily Packaging your own updates If you're not doing any of these things, you don't need ...


5

This mirror seems to be kept up-to-date: http://mirror.centos.org/centos/7/os/x86_64/Packages/


5

Or debsums -e | grep FAILED which will also show all missing conffiles (from the debsums package)


5

Unless there are Red Hat developers/product managers here, I don't think you'll get an answer justifying this. It's especially perplexing in the "Server" product. Either way, it's trivial to remove the packages in %post, or Kickstart with %packages --nobase and start with a minimal installation and build up your package list from there. Erase packages ...


5

I'd say that this may not be worth the effort. If disk space isn't an issue and you're not running any extraneous services, there's no real impact or need to create a minimal installation. If anything, it becomes an annoyance when you need certain tools (nmap, lsof, a compiler, etc.) In the end, my kickstarts are either minimal+packages installed via Puppet ...


5

yum provides *linux/net_tstamp.h kernel-debug-devel-2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64 : Development package for building kernel modules to match the debug kernel Repo : base Matched from: Filename : /usr/src/kernels/2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64.debug/include/linux/net_tstamp.h kernel-devel-2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64 : Development package for building kernel modules to ...


5

Your existing version of compat-libevent14 comes from the PostgreSQL yum repository. There is a bug open on the conflict between compat-libevent14 and libevent-devel. And another one. Assuming that you need the PostgreSQL repository enabled, your best course of action would be to remove compat-libevent14 and install libevent and libevent-devel from the ...


5

I believe the following will do what you want, as by default yum won't let you install a release BELOW what's available: yum install yum-versionlock and then: yum --allow-downgrade install bind-libs-9.8.2-0.17.rc1.el6_4.5.x86_64 and to maintain this version in the case of future package updates to your system: yum versionlock bind-libs


5

All the points made are of course correct. I would just like to take some issue with the idea that 5%-15% performance increase is unachievable, especially with modern versions of GCC, it really depends upon the CPU architecture and how close it is to the base-line used as the target for the binary distributions. GCCs -march=native will, in addition to ...


5

Turns out systemd-machined is in a separate package from the main systemd package. In order to install systemd-machined on Debian Stretch, you have to run apt-get install -y systemd-container.


5

This is normal as Debian 8 (jessie) is currently the oldstable release. If you search for Package curl you'll notice that the stable version currently has curl 7.52, while testing & unstable are already on version 7.62. Old Debian releases won't have new feature updates, but receives security updated for a rather long LTS period. Therefore, having an ...


4

If you want to install a package without updating the db, you download the rpm directly (either via yumdownloader, ftp or web browser) and then install it with the rpm directly: rpm -ivh packagename I do not recommend you do this, as it is a lot more work to track down the dependencies (that is why yum is created) and it could break future installs via yum....


4

What you're asking is out of the spirit of yum in some regards. Yum is a comprehensive package and dependency manager. In order to do it's job and not screw up your system by mix-and-matching incompatible packages, it needs to have that data you don't want to update. You can manually analyze what dependencies a package has by using deplist <packagename&...


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