51

from man debsums: debsums -ce List changed configuration files.


26

Here is the way which worked for me : Installed GMP with apt-get install php5-gmp Added extension=php_gmp.so to php.ini Et voilà ! phpinfo() sample : gmp gmp support enabled GMP version 4.3.2 It works fine here (Debian), so I suppose it will be ok for Ubuntu too.


18

https://pkgs.org/ provides a "Linux Packages Search" for several distributions, including CentOS 5–7.


12

If you want yum to behave like apt-get (not to update the metadata by each run), edit /etc/yum.conf and put there: metadata_expire=never or metadata_expire=7d in case you want to update the metadata after a week. If you run yum makecache, your metadata will be updated like by apt-get update in Debian. But keep in mind that if you use "never" in the ...


12

Sorry to necro, but while @naught101's answer was correct for modified files, it didn't help for added files. @Graeme's solution is nice, but depends on etckeeper; I don't want to modify the filesystem. find /etc -type f | grep -vFf <(debsums -e -r /etc | sed 's/[[:space:]]*OK$//') Find files in /etc/ that debsums does not report as valid. This means ...


10

Short answer... Many large-scale and speed/latency sensitive applications run on standard Linux distributions. Red Hat, CentOS, Debian, Ubuntu... They all work well in the majority of cases. Most gains come from application tuning, standard kernel and OS optimizations and infrastructure. Gentoo may offer some optimizations, but open the door to more ...


10

You should purge those packages. apt-get purge somepackage from man apt-get (APT-GET(8)) purge purge is identical to remove except that packages are removed and purged (any configuration files are deleted too). This is supposed to remove everything added by the package, such as config and data files. But I would assume it's possible that it ...


9

The lowest. Seriously - the lowest standard ShockWatch label/sticker is 25G. A 25G shock is pretty severe (easily enough to dislodge boards, snap backplanes, etc). You should also label your packaging "FRAGILE" and instruct your recipients to refuse delivery if there is ANY evidence of damage to the box (a crushed corner is often the only outward sign of a ...


8

You are on Debian 10 (buster), but the link you showed is for Debian 9 (stretch). OpenJDK is on version 11 for Buster and OpenJDK 8 is not available. https://packages.debian.org/buster/openjdk-11-jdk If you need this, use a docker image based on Stretch.


7

Sorry for a year late answer! I had the same problem and fixed it, I don't know if you changed the name of a directory after creating the virtual environment, I did though. If so then here's what I did. 1.) deactivate your v-env. After the fix you need to restart the v-env, so might as well deactivate now. right? 2.) Now, since we created the v-env in a ...


7

The performance difference will be in almost all cases minimal and not worthwhile. Good reasons to use source distributions (while rolling your own binary packages, as gentoo's bindist system allows) include: Deploying your own custom patches Customizing your kernel easily Packaging your own updates If you're not doing any of these things, you don't need ...


6

Or debsums -e | grep FAILED which will also show all missing conffiles (from the debsums package)


6

I spent quite some time investigating this same issue and I reached the conclusion that the the "Provides" is ignored because xen-utils-4.0 has a versioned "Depends" on xen-utils-common. Quoting the Debian Policy Manual: A Provides field may not contain version numbers, and the version number of the concrete package which provides a particular virtual ...


6

At least for me, yum is bright enough that if I tell it to install something which is already installed, and for which an update is available, it will just apply the update instead. E.g.: [root@risby ~]# rpm -qa|grep openvpn openvpn-2.2.2-7.fc17.x86_64 openvpn is installed. [root@risby ~]# yum update [...] --> Running transaction check ---> Package ...


6

Install the package debsums. Run debsums -a to check all packages.


6

All the points made are of course correct. I would just like to take some issue with the idea that 5%-15% performance increase is unachievable, especially with modern versions of GCC, it really depends upon the CPU architecture and how close it is to the base-line used as the target for the binary distributions. GCCs -march=native will, in addition to ...


6

Turns out systemd-machined is in a separate package from the main systemd package. In order to install systemd-machined on Debian Stretch, you have to run apt-get install -y systemd-container.


5

This mirror seems to be kept up-to-date: http://mirror.centos.org/centos/7/os/x86_64/Packages/


5

yum provides *linux/net_tstamp.h kernel-debug-devel-2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64 : Development package for building kernel modules to match the debug kernel Repo : base Matched from: Filename : /usr/src/kernels/2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64.debug/include/linux/net_tstamp.h kernel-devel-2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64 : Development package for building kernel modules to ...


5

Your existing version of compat-libevent14 comes from the PostgreSQL yum repository. There is a bug open on the conflict between compat-libevent14 and libevent-devel. And another one. Assuming that you need the PostgreSQL repository enabled, your best course of action would be to remove compat-libevent14 and install libevent and libevent-devel from the ...


5

I believe the following will do what you want, as by default yum won't let you install a release BELOW what's available: yum install yum-versionlock and then: yum --allow-downgrade install bind-libs-9.8.2-0.17.rc1.el6_4.5.x86_64 and to maintain this version in the case of future package updates to your system: yum versionlock bind-libs


5

It depends on what you want in your system, and really there's three schools of thought here (and this is true for both hardware and software) Firstly, the mainstream as far as most folks on SF go - you want something you know will work, you want support and you want it now. In this case, going with redhat based systems (RHEL gives you excellent support, ...


5

If you are missing and need GMP itself, you can install GMP from the CentOS Base repository. yum -y install gmp As for the php-gmp package, it is not available in the standard CentOS 6 Base repository. You either have to create it yourself which can be tedious, or use a non-standard repository which includes it. NOTE: Do know that this will replace the ...


5

This is normal as Debian 8 (jessie) is currently the oldstable release. If you search for Package curl you'll notice that the stable version currently has curl 7.52, while testing & unstable are already on version 7.62. Old Debian releases won't have new feature updates, but receives security updated for a rather long LTS period. Therefore, having an ...


5

Apparently Debian 10 alias Buster only provides openjdk 11 packages. In my case this meant using debian 9 alias stretch instead. I must admit it wasn't very clever using latest as a version in the first place. before: FROM debian:latest after: FROM debian:stretch Debian stretch is a LTS version supported until 06.2022


4

Check your yum.conf to see if there is an exclude argument, eg.: exclude=apache* httpd* mod_* mysql* MySQL* da_* *ftp* exim* sendmail* bind-chroot* This is sometimes set by default when using for example DirectAdmin or other control panel apps.


4

ia32-libs was really just a hack to get 32 bit libs onto 64 bits as a hold over waiting for multi-arch, which we now have, making ia32-libs obsolete. You can now install i386 packages directly into and amd64 install, once you enable it. I'm assuming that now you are on amd64. To verify, run dpkg --print-architecture and expect it to return amd64. Then ...


4

You would have to set a variable with a case statement, sort of like this: class puppet::installation inherits puppet { case $::operatingsystemrelease { '5': { $puppet_ver = '3.0.1-1'} default: { $puppet_ver = '3.0.1-1.el6'} } package { 'puppet': ensure => $puppet_ver, } } However,...


4

It is trying to run yum to install httpd /usr/bin/yum -d 0 -e 0 -y install httpd Try running that as root but I'm sure it will fail so try /usr/bin/yum clean all /usr/bin/yum -d 0 -e 0 -y install httpd If that doesn't work your yum repositories are not working so you'll have to fix that file. Probably files in /etc/yum.repos.d


4

The second one, package {$build_packages:. That gets expanded into a resource for each member of the array, and each package in the array will be installed. Note that the array will, however, break the notify resource since its message is assuming that $build_packages is a string.


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