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10

I had the same problem while Sysinternals Process Explorer was running. Exiting Sysinternals Process Explorer fixed the problem.


8

Some of the concepts in the Windows kernel differ significantly from those in Linux, this is why you do not see an iowait counter in Perfmon. First, the entity of scheduling in Windows is a thread, not a process. A process is just a container for 1+ threads. Additionally, Windows does not define an uninterruptible sleep state for its threads (more precisely,...


7

Sadly, there is no default Performance Monitor counter that does this. You will need to consider using WMI to tally the total RAM in a server, then totaling the amount of used RAM versus free RAM, storing that data as it is collected, and then presenting it in a pretty way. However, that kind of thing has already been done for you in the form of the basic ...


7

Each drive can do 180 random IOPs. Is your workload totally random? I bet what you're seeing is sequential reads/writes.


5

What are the versions of your SQL server and your remote monitor machine? If your remote monitor machine is 32 bit and your sql server is 64 bit, perhaps you cannot consume the SQL performance counters remotely. This MSDN link explained the reason.


5

In my experience running data collector sets is safe, the main thing to keep an eye on is how much data you are generating. It really just depends on what you are looking for, but there are three ways to control how much data is collected: The Number of counters you monitor How long you let the collector run for The "Sample Interval" the properties for the ...


5

Of course it would. Why wouldn't it? There's nothing saying you can't use both perfmon and vCenter counters to monitor the performance of your VMs - perfmon is better at or easier to set up for some metrics, and vCenter's counters are for other metrics, so it makes sense to use whichever one fits better for the specific metric and purpose you're monitoring....


4

From here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2267427 Memory, Committed Bytes: This is a measure of the demand for virtual memory. It shows how many bytes have been allocated by processes and to which the operating system has committed a RAM page frame or a page slot in the pagefile (or both). As Committed Bytes grows above the available RAM, paging ...


4

Once you have the counters you want selected, Right-click "Performance Monitor" (the red circled bit), and select New, Data Collector Set. Go through the wizard, and it should have all the counters you selected already populated in there.


4

I know this is old but might as well add some answer to this question for future use... Make sure you can connect telnet thehostname 445 Or on linux nc -v -w3 thehostname 445 Connection to test-ws1 445 port [tcp/microsoft-ds] succeeded! Make sure something is listening C:\Users\Administrator>netstat -ao | find "445" TCP 0.0.0.0:445 ...


4

I would assume it is caching. You said write cache is disabled, but I see the "Array accelerator cache", I'm not familiar with that - but memory caching would explain bursts of high throughput.


4

I found this article that details some steps about rebuilding PerfMon settings. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/300956 I then ran the following in an elevated command prompt: cd /d %systemroot%\system32 lodctr /r cd /d %systemroot%\syswow64 lodctr /r I then ran MMC and addred PerfMon. Initially I received the same error that the parameter was incorrect. ...


4

Does it do this for every update? Yes.


3

For ASP.net performance counters, you can check here


3

This blog post by Brent Ozar is really good for the SQL side. I use the advice here as a starting point to monitor my servers. Perfmon has wait stats for each instance as well so you can easily compare how your instances are doing. The Activity Monitor in SQL Server Management Studio is also useful for looking at the instances individually. I like to ...


3

See if this helps: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/nl/exchange2010/thread/55da7565-abc1-4c40-bade-7d3dc420de2e. Lots of possible causes are discussed there.


3

I've discovered the root cause(s) and will update them here: High CAS CPU was caused by BES servers. This was sporadic and variable Journaling. Our archiving processes was using 8000 MAPI connections to a server, and caused high CPU Outlook users on NAT. Many people using outlook anywhere were behind a NAT. Our load balancer load balanced them by IP ...


3

You should really tune for PERFORMANCE, not for magic numbers. Zero paging file (swap) utilization is a nice goal if you can attain it, but if you have sufficient RAM for all of SQL server's needs and you are not experiencing a performance problem you probably don't need to "tune" anything. Having some data sitting in the paging file which is never going ...


3

You need RPC between the machines. The endpoint mapper is TCP 135, which then negotiates high-numbered ephemeral ports on which to send subsequent traffic. Check your firewalls, both hardware and Windows Firewall. \\computername\c$ works because it does not require RPC, only TCP 445. (AKA Direct-hosted SMB.) And since you can access an admin share, it's ...


3

Monitoring Available MB is sort of useless. No one cares how much RAM is free, the OS should be consuming a large amount of "free" RAM for buffers/cache. That's where Committed Bytes come in. That's memory that's actually in use. Anything else in memory is just there for caching and will be released if a program actually needs that memory. % Committed ...


3

Request Wait Time The value of this counter is the number of milliseconds that the most recent request spent waiting in the global queue. This does not include any time the request spent waiting in the application queues. The threshold for this counter is 1,000. The average request should spend 0 milliseconds waiting in the queue. http://technet.microsoft....


3

You should start with the basics; Processor Information\% Processor Time Memory\Pages/Sec Memory: Available Bytes Logical Disk*\Average Disk Queue Length SQL Server:Buffer Manager\Buffer cache hit ratio If you went with the default install of non-express SQL then it will take all the memory it can and starve IIS/Windows. On the other hand, if SQL doesn't ...


3

Avg. Disk sec/Transfer measures latency. You want to measure Disk Transfer/Sec for IOPS calculations. Also make sure when you do your analysis with PAL you take note if the disks are RAID virtual disks containing more than one physical disk etc. Otherwise you can get invalid threshold/results.


3

I was not able to reproduce your problem but do note the default report may lead somebody to think only _Total was collected. The default report will show _Total counters but you can add more including <All Instances>.


2

I had the exact same problem. I found that in the Performance Monitor under Event Trace Sessions that the NT Kernel Logger was running. I stopped it and the DCS ran fine. What was weird is that on the other server that NT Kernel Logger was not there. That's why it ran with out a problem.


2

If you suspect that a particular application or service is causing a memory leak, investigate the memory use of your applications using the following counters: Memory\Available Bytes reports available bytes; its value tends to fall during a memory leak. Memory\Committed Bytes reports the private bytes committed to processes; its value tends to rise during a ...


2

Process/Private Bytes will give you the memory for the worker process. Process/Virtual Bytes or Process/Working Set will give you virtual memory. You can do some easy searches to learn how to analyze the data you get after monitoring and see either or both of those counters rising.


2

Logon type 4 is as batch. The account's missing the "Log on as a batch job" permission on the target server. The Administrators group is in this policy by default, but is likely being overridden by a domain Group Policy Object. You'll want to check the resultant set of policy for Computer\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Local Policies\User Rights ...


2

Edit: Previous answer nonsense! The user has not been granted the requested logon type at this machine. Try explicitly granting "log on locally" rights to your domain account. Could the AD policy be denying the right to administrators?


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