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In case Layer 2 switch the IP is not so important and there are traffic based on MAC address. Until the destination is on the same network segment (for Layer 3 view once it is on the same subnet - e.g. 192.168.0.0/24 - 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.0.254 ) there is utilized ARP protocol (if the MAC of the destination is not known) and then there is communication ...


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The "single IP" they give you would probably be their router's IP address, you are supposed to ship off all off-premises traffic there. That should be connected to your "public" network, and your "private" network would be connected (via NAT) to the previous one. "Full" setup is to have one router/firewall connected to the outside world and the public ...


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A "layer 2 switch" is really a switch, i.e., its only task is to forward network frames from one net branch to the other. But with today's plummeting hardware costs, many devices called "switch" have lots of additional features (like handling VLANs, faking separate networks using the same box -- essentially allowing you to separate the switch into several ...


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In VPN/IPsec/Mobile Clients, in User Authentication, highlight all Sources that you wish to use, click Save, then Apply. If you highlight 2 AD Domain Controllers, either one will authenticate if the other one is down. I tested this by shutting down each DC and verifying the other DC would authenticate IKEv2 VPN users. This can also be checked in the DC ...


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