11

From the dnsmasq example config # An example of dhcp-boot with an external TFTP server: the name and IP # address of the server are given after the filename. # Can fail with old PXE ROMS. Overridden by --pxe-service. #dhcp-boot=/var/ftpd/pxelinux.0,boothost,192.168.0.3 # If there are multiple external tftp servers having a same name # (using /etc/hosts) ...


10

There's no such thing as a "PXE Server" per-se. The host gets information from a DHCP or BOOTP server, which includes the address of a TFTP server (called 'next-server'). PXE is the software running (usually) from firmware that collects the DHCP/BOOTP information, contacts the TFTP server, downloads various information and eventually starts an Operating ...


10

Yes, this is possible provided your target network is configured to relay DHCP and TFTP traffic. You'll likely need IP "helper addresses" on the client's network that point back to the actual DHCP server's IP address. See: Broadcast between VLANs


8

Why start with the DRACs at all? Dell can ship servers with a preconfigured RAID setup, so all you need is autodeploy an OS on all of them (kickstart/pxe/foreman/whatever you prefer), and then configure the DRACs locally using racadm when you have an OS already running on the hosts. That, in turn, can also be automated using Puppet/Chef/Ansible/Salt/etc


8

Use Powershell to Remove Network Boot Devices from the Boot Order You can use PowerShell to strip the Network BootTypes from the VMs boot order. Extract the Current Boot Order Using Powershell you can use this command to extract the current boot order: $old_boot_order = Get-VMFirmware -VMName testvm -ComputerName MyHyperVHost ` | Select-...


6

To answer my own question. It is possible using iPXE and iSCSI or AoE. The idea is to either replace the network card option ROM with iPXE or to chainload ipxe and then do a sanboot. iSCSI is the easier of the two san protocols because you can actually install Windows 7 directly to an iSCSI target. This is because iSCSI support is built into windows 7 ...


6

There’s a conflict between the architecture types defined in RFC4578 DHCP PXE Options and the IANA registered Processor Architecture Types: the latter notes that x64 UEFI is type 00:07 which seems to be the value used in practice (ref. https://www.syslinux.org/archives/2014-October/022684.html). There's an Errata ID 4624 filed on the RFC. It states that 7 ...


6

On G7 and earlier servers, this can be changed in the BIOS. This assumes onboard interfaces. (I hope you have ILO access) Press F9 during POST to get into the system BIOS menu (ROM-Based Setup Utility). Follow the menus from System Options > Embedded NICs > NIC X Boot Options. Select the NIC you wish to boot from, and flip the Network Boot flag. ...


6

(My initial answer was premature. As promised, I've rewritten it after having gotten everything working.) First of all, I've found that in general iSCSI-boot-enabling software is half-baked, and the disparate systems involved interoperate very poorly. For this reason I recommend instead going with a hardware-based solution such as iSCSI HBAs if possible. ...


6

Depending on the environment and your provisioning process, it may be faster to build anew than using VMware templates and the clone from template feature. I did work in a large Linux-focused VMware environment, where the deployment process wasn't as automated as it should have been. We relied on vSphere templates of RHEL systems, but quite a bit of manual ...


6

First thing to understand: PXE stands for Preboot Execution Environment. That alone should clear up things a bit. I will limit myself to systems using this PXE stuff. There might be other methods, but I'll just mention PXE. Is a re-image task 'pushed' from a server to clients while they are turned on using client software built into the OS? No. PXE ...


5

We faced the same problem and found the following to be excellent for explanations: http://gparted-forum.surf4.info/viewtopic.php?id=16400 http://sourceforge.net/projects/clonezilla/forums/forum/663168/topic/4511817 Our configuration: Debian/kFreeBSD (sid) tftp-hpa (5.2-4) Clonezilla Live Image (current stable 1.2.12-67) The cause of the problem, like ...


5

This is kind of an old post, but it still comes up in search results, so I'm going to add to it. First: having two DHCP servers in a subnet is not going to cause problems no matter what, that's a very misleading statement. What will cause issues is two DHCP servers which are offering the same pool of addresses. You can have two servers offering different ...


5

OK, first let's clear up a few misconceptions: As MailQ has pointed out, most diskless server configurations require NFS (since you mentioned ubuntu in the comments, check out their instructions). It doesn't HAVE to be NFS (the Network File System from Sun), but it does have to be A Network File System -- you can't PXE load a whole OS image over the ...


5

The scenario you describe essentially amounts to the use of each workstation as a thin client to access a centrally located desktop environment. It would be highly impractical for Windows 7 to boot from PXE even if it could be done. Whenever PXE is used to boot, it downloads the entirety of the boot image to the client system, which would mean several GB ...


5

You can install ipxe onto a disk and load it using syslinux (or some other bootloader); this will get you something that will behave exactly like a system booted via a PXE BIOS. The iPXE distribution includes tools for building a bootable ISO image, which you could use to boot systems in OpenStack, or you could build a hard disk image with a very similar ...


5

Get Software Assurance licensing for the 300 PCs, install Windows Thin PC. Use GPO to configure: Windows Firewall Certificates (To install your Code Signing Cert) RDP Pass-Through Authentication. I like to also configure the Remote Registry service to Auto Start (Delayed), makes some maintenance easier. Set the users shell to a script in the netlogon ...


5

Altering the append with desired parameters definitely won't help from PXELINUX in this setup, as the boot disk has its own ISOLINUX handling the kernel boot. Two ways to fix this. The simpler option: extract the ISO, modify the isolinux/isolinux.cfg file's append line with the needed boot arguments, re-pack the ISO. Have PXELINUX chain to the modified ...


5

Oh, the section "PXE booting with NAT" in manual has said it but not very clear. "6.3.2. PXE booting with NAT PXE booting is now supported in NAT mode. The NAT DHCP server provides a boot file name of the form vmname.pxe if the directory TFTP exists in the directory where the user's VirtualBox.xml file is kept. It is the responsibility of the user to ...


5

When you "mount" winpe_amd64.iso on a VM and boot from it the ISO sees itself booting from a CD/DVD drive (either real or virtual). When you boot winpe_amd64.iso from memdisk the ISO sees an "emulated" (created by memdisk) disk environment. APPEND iso raw Some Windows ISO's need the 'raw' option on some PCs. It is possible to map and boot from some CD/DVD ...


5

For this to work you will need to set the VLAN tag in the NIC's BIOS, if there is any. Another solution would be to run the imaging network untagged into the systems, making PXE boot possible if the card can't boot from a tagged network. Then configure the operating system driver to use a tag for the production network.


5

There used to be a WinTarget.net AoE target for Windows, but domain name is currently parked so I guess development is over. You might find binaries on CNET and some other file dumps but I'm not sure you want to do that ;) StarWind had kernel-based AoE target for sure, you might ask them. https://forums.starwindsoftware.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=2332


5

It may be a good idea to check with Outpace IO. They have an AoE background AFAIR. Other than that there aren't many folks doing AoE these days. I think that lack of vendors is a good enough factor to start routing traffic and switch over to iSCSI. At least there are vendors actively developing and supporting it. You can also get good iSCSI targets for ...


5

dhcp protocol can send hostname. It can be set with request host-name option in gnu/linux. https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1533#section-3.14


5

This appears to happen when the system page file is located on the iSCSI device. While locating the page file on iSCSI worked fine under Windows 7, it appears to be broken in Windows 10. Unfortunately, Windows defaults to setting up a page file on the primary disk, so when the primary disk is iSCSI, it is broken out-of-the-box. (Note that the stop code ...


4

This question is a bit old, but I ran into this issue with a Force10 S4810 switch and this is the first result on Google. After consulting with someone from Dell Force10, they recommended I use this configuration: lacp ungroup member-independent port-channel <1-128> If the members of the port channel are not up, they will revert to switchports.


4

I finally got to the bottom of this and did manage to get it working. In the process, though, I've come to the conclusion that iSCSI boot functionality in Windows, gPXE, and iPXE are all half-baked. I'll share the approach that worked for me in case it helps anyone else, but please be aware of some caveats: This is a poor solution. A hardware-based ...


4

I've seen Portfast (or the lack thereof) cause this. Enabling Portfast on the ports between the DHCP client and server resolved the problem for me. The other time you may see this issue is with Pre-Boot Execution (PXE) devices, such as Windows Deployment Services. The following figure shows a typical PXE implementation. Here is what happens with PXE: ...


4

PXE uses DHCP. You can run PXE on a network with separate PXE and DHCP servers, but PXE does need to listen on DHCP. It just can't hand out IP addresses. It kind of goes like this: PXE Client: DHCPREQUEST, p.s. I'm a PXE Client. DHCP Server: DHCPACK, Here's your IP! p.s., PXE over there -> PXE Server: DHCPACK, Hello, I'll be your PXE server today....


4

In dhcpd.conf, make sure the lines "option domain-name-servers" and "next-server" have the correct IP address. In the /var/lib/tftpboot/linux-install/pxelinux.cfg files, make sure root=nfs:IP:/directory has the correct IP address.


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