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20

The performance degradation occurs when your zpool is either very full or very fragmented. The reason for this is the mechanism of free block discovery employed with ZFS. Opposed to other file systems like NTFS or ext3, there is no block bitmap showing which blocks are occupied and which are free. Instead, ZFS divides your zvol into (usually 200) larger ...


17

Add it anywhere in main.cf, it's not relevant :) But it's good to keep directives grouped in some logical manner, it is easier for maintance According to official postfix documentation: message_size_limit (default: 10240000) The maximal size in bytes of a message, including envelope information. Note: be careful when making changes. Excessively small values ...


10

You can remount /tmp with bind and noexec,nodev,nosuid options but not in one step. Due to some linux kernel VFS layer limitations you have to first bind-mount it and then remount with proper options. root@utemp:/# /tmp/test.sh uid=0(root) gid=0(root) groups=0(root) root@utemp:/# mount -o bind,noexec /tmp /tmp root@utemp:/# ./tmp/test.sh uid=0(root) gid=0(...


9

Yes, you are correct: message_size_limit is the configuration directive you need. Put it anywhere in the main.cf file and reload (or restart) Postfix. You may use the postconf tool to check the currently configured value: postconf message_size_limit


9

Yes. You need to keep free space in your pool. It's mainly for copy-on-write actions and snapshots. Performance declines at about 85% utilization. You can go higher, but there's a definite impact. Don't mess with reservations. Especially with NFS. It's not necessary. Maybe for a zvol, but not NFS. I don't see the confusion, though. If you have 10T, Don't ...


7

Okay, I've managed to get it figured out, so I'm going to answer my own question to the best of my knowledge. The original error was caused by the fact that the quota format vfsv0 is unable to support quotas >= 4TiB. Quota has a (relatively) new format to support quotas >4TiB, called vfsv1. You need at least kernel 2.6.33 for kernel support for vfsv1. You ...


7

Be careful if setting this limit to a high number. You need at least 1.5 times the size of message_size_limit of free space on the partition where the Postfix queue resides. If you don't have that free space, then all messages are rejected even if they are only a few kilobyte in size. And if you receive one message of this size and then the space exceeds (...


6

You can only limit mailboxes by size, not item count in Exchange. Is there any reason you care how many items are there, as long as the quota is maintained? Here is some light reading on Exchange quotas.


6

In the general case, you can't increase your inode limit without reformatting. ReiserFS doesn't use inodes. Don't use ReiserFS... it's as dead as Mrs. Reiser... though I suppose she'd probably prefer Mrs. Sharanova, considering.


5

A group quota is the maximum amount of disk space that can be used by all files owned by a particular group. There is no attempt to divide it up by users, and in practice there would be no sensible way to do that.


4

If you want to apply quota to both incoming and outgoing, you'd do it like this: -A OUTPUT -p tcp --sport $PORTNUM_1 -g filter_quota_1 -A OUTPUT -p tcp --sport $PORTNUM_2 -g filter_quota_2 <other OUTPUT rules for other users> -A INPUT -p tcp --dport $PORTNUM_1 -g filter_quota_1 -A INPUT -p tcp --dport $PORTNUM_2 -g filter_quota_2 <other INPUT ...


4

You can use hooks to accomplish this. It has been discussed on stackoverflow. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/7147699/limiting-file-size-in-git-repository


4

Remove grpquota,usrquota, from the entry for /home in your /etc/fstab file. That will permanently disable quota usage on the volume in question.


3

Don't forget to set virtual_mailbox_limit = <size_in_bytes> if you are using a virtual mailbox configuration. Took me ages to find this, no one seems to talk about it. ;)


3

Check out cgroups http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cgroups cgroups (control groups) is a Linux kernel feature to limit, account and isolate resource usage (CPU, memory, disk I/O, etc.) of process groups. Demo from RedHat http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KX5QV4LId_c


3

If you want Exchange to automatically enforce a limit, I think you have to resort to monitoring the size of the folders. The Exchange Team Blog has an Article about Finding High Item Count Folders using this PowerShell command: Get-Mailbox | Get-MailboxFolderStatistics | Where {$_.ItemsInFolder -gt 5000} | Sort-Object -Property ItemsInFolder -Descending | ...


3

New filesystem for each shared folder is IMHO overkill. Just make new group for each shared folder, set owner group of shared folder to this group, set a sticky bit to group (so that every new file and directory has this group as owner )and for permissions on files and folders use acl lists. Then set quotas for these groups.


3

Repquota should be almost instant, however doing a quota check won't be. On a server with about 500k files 4 disk RAID0 it took around half an hour, however that was with fairly high disk load (50% or so). It does depend on the number of files, not so much disk size as disk speed. repquota reports based on the quota file (which is updated when quota runs, i ...


3

Try the DISKUSE.EXE tool from the Windows 2k3 resource kit, with command line options. The options below scan the H: drive for files owned by mydomain\johnsmith, and output their size the day it was created, and full path to c:\tmp\files.txt diskuse H:\ /f:c:\tmp\files.txt /u:mydomain\johnsmith /s/t/d:c /v The output looks like: DiskUse Output from 11/05/...


3

I heard of cases where the IWAM_ user has a quota set and you may be hitting it.


3

You can use the mountpoint command. The -d switch prints the major/minor device number of the mount point to stdout. In your case, compare the output of mountpoint -d /home/lars to mountpoint -d /home/bob. [root@Fruity ~]# df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda2 9.9G 2.5G 7.0G 26% / /dev/sda1 97M ...


3

simfs is a sign of OpenVZ in use, it means your VE (container) is overused its disk quota.


3

Looks like the quota report produced by /usr/local/sbin/quota_notify. I'm tracked the same email format from this article Virtual Users And Domains With Postfix, Courier, MySQL And SquirrelMail (Ubuntu 14.04LTS) step 11. The user script was written in perl and contains some explanation about the parameters. If the script doesn't match the description above: ...


3

Permissions on policyd2 sqlite3 database file were wrong. PolicyD2 has capability to run daemon as specific user, in my case: /etc/policyd.conf # User to run this daemon as user=policyd group=policyd Permissions on the database were root:root. -rw-r--r-- root root policyd2.db After changing to policyd:policyd i could send emails. -rw-r--r-- policyd ...


3

The quota system for the XFS file system needs to be enabled and managed in a slightly different manner to how it is/was done with other file systems. The mount option to enable quota is not quota but one or more of: uquota/uqnoenforce - User quotas gquota/gqnoenforce - Group quotas pquota/pqnoenforce - Project quota Each mount option can also be ...


3

Use options -r and -e: btrfs qgroup show -pcre /path


2

If you want the StorageLimitStatus to update immediately, you'll have to restart the Information Store service. If this is not an option, try this: Run Clean-MailboxDatabase [MBDatabaseName] and then Connect-Mailbox [UserName] -Database [MBDatabaseName] Don't worry, the Clean-MailboxDatabase doesn't "clean" as in remove anything. It just updates ...


2

repquota(8) is not the command for this: It's designed to operate on the whole filesystem, not the stuff owned by an individual user/group. You want to use quota(1) instead. Something like quota -u myuser will do what you want. See the manpage, specifically the -u (user) option, for more details.


2

edquota is not really suitable for scripting. quotatool handles quotas from the commandline. Easy to use in scripts. It's included in most major Linux distributions, and is also available for *BSD, Mac OSX, AIX and Solaris.


2

quota -s <user> will provide you human readable format output as follows Disk quotas for user rashah (uid 524295): Filesystem blocks quota limit grace files quota limit grace /dev/mapper/work3 19502M 48829M 58594M 70086 0 0


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