Hot answers tagged

14

The answer is a very clear "No". ReFS only detects bit rot in user data if the file in question has "Integrity Streams" enabled (Sources: official TechNet docs, everyone's favorite blog post, and another spot). Oh, and you also lose COW (Copy-On-Write) when Integrity Streams are disabled. Since you cannot use a VHDX residing on a ReFS volume unless ...


8

Engineering is all about choices and trade-offs. If you want speed? Mirror If you favor cost? Parity Neither is better than the other. Ask the SysAdmin that is over budget but has too few users to appreciate the aggregate speed achieved by mirroring, or the SysAdmin that impressed his/her boss by saving money but now the company is going out of ...


8

Any online writable disk can be corrupted by a malicious software or user. Underestimating them by assuming they cannot find a file share is a mistake. Last line of defense for important data is always tested, cold offline backups. And in this case, the important data may include backups themselves! Think about the possible ways to make backup archives ...


7

Leaving the question of iSCSI vulnerability when using it without a clustered file system but with multiple initiators aside, I can hardly find any clear reason why file sharing protocol would be more secure in terms of ransomware comparing to iSCSI. You get CHAP to strengthen authentication and IPSec to secure data transfer over the network. Here is a good ...


7

ReFS by itself cannot repair corruptions, it is a feature of Storage Spaces. But ReFS will detect them when on files with data integrity stream enabled when reading the corrupted block, or when ReFS data scrubber encounters the corrupted block during its patrol reads. ReFS is a "new" file system and its stability of ReFS for long-term backup repository is ...


7

ReFS is much like ZFS in general. They both are completely CPU oriented and do not use anything from hardware RAID controllers. Other vendors (for example StarWind with LSFS) are using hardware parity RAID offload if present so it's not clear why Microsoft has neglected.


6

ReFS (and Storage Spaces Direct from Windows Server 2016 if you care) takes care indeed of some hardware offload features present in Intel Xeon CPUs (they somehow refuse to work if f.e. "popcnt" instruction support is missing) for strong hash summing but it doesn't use anything with XOR and polynomial calculations for RAID6 neither from CPUs nor from ...


5

Yes, any file-level network data access protocol is SAFER compared to the block (iSCSI, FC, FCoE etc) one due to inability to damage the volume with "network redirector", which is super-easy to do with an improperly configured clustered or any local file system (EXT3/4, ReFS, XFS etc). Whole story is covered well here: https://forums....


5

Make sure you understand ReFS with checksumming enabled turns itself into log-structured file system, and this thing alone dramatically changes I/O pattern. TL;DR: Not all the workloads are OK with "safe" ReFS. https://www.starwindsoftware.com/blog/log-structured-file-systems-microsoft-refs-v2-investigation-part-1 It's bad do layer one log on top of the ...


5

Re-format your "orphan" volume as NTFS, recover your data from backup and ditch ReFS from production for another couple of years. When ReFS volumes get filled up to 60-80% they tend to lock up. If you have ReFS user data hashing enabled situation turns even worse.


4

Yes. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj612868(v=ws.11).aspx To use CSV, your storage and disks must meet the following requirements: File system format. In Windows Server 2012 R2, a disk or storage space for a CSV volume must be a basic disk that is partitioned with NTFS or ReFS. Like NTFS or better. Windows doesn't replicate @ file system ...


4

Be aware of the fact tiering with ReFS + Windows Server 2019 works in a totally different way compared to NTFS + Windows Server 2016. 2016: All writes go to the flash tier with the data being offloaded to spinning disk when flash is getting full / close to being full (~80% usable capacity occupied AFAIR). 2019: All writes go immediately to the spinning ...


4

You can check it in the Performance Monitor. Add Physical disks Read and Write counters for your SSDs and HDDs. In this case, you will be able to see which Tier is being utilized by seeing which drives are doing IO. In addition, configure ReFS counter of fast and slow tiers utilization percentage. This information will give you data distribution between ...


4

Multiple things are wrong in this setup: 1) RAID controller is not supported for Storage Spaces. The fact that you can use it to create Storage Pool and Virtual Disk doesn't mean that it will be supported by Microsoft. In any case, any MSP or MVP and Microsoft Support will point to RAID controller if something went wrong with storage... The possible ...


3

VHDX file itself validates and maintains data integrity using checksums on top of the ReFS. If you would like to have such possibility for independent files, you need to format hard disk as ReFS inside the VM. Moreover, ReFS can still auto-detect data corruption and automatically perform needed repairs without using Storage Spaces. Also, ReFS mostly was ...


2

Enabling integrity streams causes both user data and the filesystem metadata to be checksummed (reference Resilient File System Overview). Otherwise, just filesystem metadata is checksummed. The integrity.exe tool, that can be used to toggle integrity on/off for empty files, seems to be very poorly documented by Microsoft. I haven't actually had occasion to ...


2

Storage spaces seems very sensitive to write latency: if it too much spikes, the volume can be dropped. This seems a know problem when using consumer SSDs, as you can find here


2

There doesn't seem to be a definitive answer to the question as I myself have been looking for an answer. One thing to note is that the inbuilt defragmentation software in Windows Server 2012 and 2016 both support and report on ReFS storage health. I don't have any ReFS volumes that have been used over an extended period of time and all are still reporting ...


2

You can try to restore ReFS one time by using free software which is simply restoring the partition if no blocks were written. However, it can be a rare situation where nothing can help restoring ReFS partition cause metadata just corrupted or missed and nothing will help... Do you have any backups? What is your reason to use ReFS instead of NTFS


2

ReFS does not support compression, but if you use deduplication on a ReFS volume, compression is used - at least according to this page https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/storage/data-deduplication/whats-new Screenshot:


1

See some test results here: https://trae.sk/view/26/ https://trae.sk/view/33/ TL;DR: it's pretty good for data that actually is duplicated AND compressible. It's not exactly advertized but anything dedupped gets compressed as well. There's a blacklist of file extensions (with reasonable defaults) to skip for compression though. Your images and videos may ...


1

There isn't a clear answer here, as it depends on your requirements. Can you lose the data? How long can your PVR "server" be down while you repair NTFS offline? ReFS has integrations with Storage Spaces, so that it can recover files from mirror/parity blocks, thus making repairs extremely fast and online, without any interruption. If you want to use ReFS (...


1

First, you really should check the HCL. I'd bet a pretty nice dinner, nothing you mentioned there is on Storage Spaces HCL. Like vSAN, Windows and Storage Spaces have completely different HCLs. I can tell without even looking up your drives, that none of them are going to be on the HCL, because none of them are enterprise grade drives. If you want a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible