24

You can enable it with the following commands: yum install dnf-plugins-core And then: yum config-manager --set-enabled powertools Or: yum config-manager --set-enabled PowerTools You can also just open /etc/yum.repos.d/CentOS-PowerTools.repo with a text editor and set enabled= to 1 instead of 0'. Run yum repolist and you'll see it. EDIT: The repo is now ...


21

I had the same problem, and after much frustration finally tracked down what was going on. The reprepro tool uses gpgme, which is based on gnupg2. A recent release of that changed how the secret key ring is handled: https://www.gnupg.org/faq/whats-new-in-2.1.html gpg used to keep the public key pairs in two files: pubring.gpg and secring.gpg ... With ...


17

The haproxy package has been removed from EPEL because it is now included with RHEL 6.4 (and will be in derivative distributions after they build 6.4). Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 introduces the haproxy package as a Technology Preview. If you need it now, you can obtain Red Hat's 6.4 SRPM and rebuild it on your system (the same way CentOS will shortly). ...


16

I was able to install the MariaDB 5.5 CentOS repository list (created 2016-05-09 04:06 UTC). Create the following file: sudo vi /etc/yum.repos.d/maria.repo Add the following contents to the file and save: [mariadb] name = MariaDB baseurl = http://yum.mariadb.org/5.5/centos6-amd64 gpgkey=https://yum.mariadb.org/RPM-GPG-KEY-MariaDB gpgcheck=1 Then run ...


12

If you want yum to behave like apt-get (not to update the metadata by each run), edit /etc/yum.conf and put there: metadata_expire=never or metadata_expire=7d in case you want to update the metadata after a week. If you run yum makecache, your metadata will be updated like by apt-get update in Debian. But keep in mind that if you use "never" in the ...


11

If all else fails, you can inspect the yumdb manually. It's located in /var/lib/yum/yumdb and contains detailed information on every installed package. You'll be particularly interested in from_repo. For example, for the bind-utils package: # for i in /var/lib/yum/yumdb/b/*bind-utils*/*; do echo $i: `cat $i`; done /var/lib/yum/yumdb/b/...


11

Notice than the most "official" solution to install recent versions of various software on Red Hat / CentOS are Software Collections. Red Hat Software Collections version 2.3 provides both php 5.6 and 7.0, and are maintained by Red Hat, and available for CentOS users in centos-scl repository, maintained by the SCLo SIG. An interesting solution comparison: ...


11

TLDR; The one-liner that fixes this is the following: sudo apt-key adv --recv-keys --keyserver ha.pool.sks-keyservers.net 5072E1F5 Which basically fetches the new key and installs it into the keyring. A bit more detail: You can find the expired key by executing the following command: LANG=C apt-key list | grep expired Which outputs something like this:...


9

At least newer yum versions (tested on Fedora 20 with yum 3.4.3) are able to distinguish between manually-installed packages and packages installed as dependencies. This information is stored in yumdb using the key "reason" which can be either set to "user" or "dep". # yumdb set reason dep [package name or wildcard] should be the equivalent to "aptitude ...


9

To install a package from one, exclude the package(s) in the /etc/yum.repos.d/epel or /etc/yum.repos.d/rpmforge files. exclude= < packagename > added at the end, you can add multiple lines if you want. The packages installed should be listed in /var/log/yum.log


8

Port 9814 is where git-daemon runs (e.g clone, git clone git://git.example.com/repo). This is meant for an internal git repository. Read the documentation for more details. You have 2 other options for setting up a remote git server: SSH server: git clone ssh://git.example.com/git/repo HTTP server git clone https://git.example.com/git/repo SSH is a lot ...


8

You select an enterprise distribution for its long term stability. The tools included in your enterprise Linux distribution such as Python, gcc, PHP, Ruby, Perl, Java etc. get the same support life cycle as the OS: up to ten years. To maintain that compatibility, the major versions of these tools are fixed at the time of the "dot-zero" release of your ...


7

Here's how I fixed the issue, at least temporarily. I copied the /etc/yum.repos.d/redhat.repo file from another working rhel6 server. Then I replaced all of the instances of sslclientkey and sslclientcert with the .pem files on this server. Then I renamed the .repo file to avoid it being wiped out on update. By doing that, I am able to install all packages ...


7

The repo file is already present on your installed CentOS system, as /etc/yum.repos.d/CentOS-Media.repo. [root@localhost ~]# cat /etc/yum.repos.d/CentOS-Media.repo # CentOS-Media.repo # # This repo can be used with mounted DVD media, verify the mount point for # CentOS-7. You can use this repo and yum to install items directly off the # DVD ISO that we ...


7

To get more info, run :- yum info epel-release Execute the following command:- sudo yum install epel-release enable the PowerTools repository since EPEL packages may depend on packages from it:- sudo yum config-manager --set-enabled PowerTools You may get an error that read as follows:- No such command: config-manager. Please use /usr/bin/yum –...


6

HAProxy is not part of the general subscription. You'll need to add the "RHEL Server Load Balancer (v. 6 for 64-bit x86_64)" channel to your entitlements before you can "yum install haproxy"


6

You installed the EPEL repository for CentOS 6, but you are actually running CentOS 7. Remove the epel-release RPM, and reinstall the correct RPM. Once you have done so, run yum clean metadata to clean out any old metadata relating to the wrong version of EPEL.


6

We use Squid for this; the nice thing about squid is that you can set individual expiry of objects based on a pattern match, fairly easily, which allows the metadata from the yum repo to be purged fairly quickly. The config we have which implements this: refresh_pattern (Release|Packages(.gz)*)$ 0 20% 2880 refresh_pattern (\.xml|xml\.gz)$ ...


5

Recently, I have encountered a similar problem. I solved it by adding SslForceVersion option. My config is like: Acquire::https::test.com { Verify-Peer "true"; Verify-Host "true"; CaInfo "/tmp/ca.crt"; SslCert "/tmp/client.crt"; SslKey "/tmp/client.key"; SslForceVersion "SSLv3"; };


5

I had success using the git -C option. Taken from the Git documentation: Run as if git was started in <path> instead of the current working directory. It is very important that the -C option comes before actual command you want to execute: Wrong: git add . -C some-path Correct: git -C some-path add .


5

yum list installed will tell you from what repo a given package was installed, e.g.: bonnie++.x86_64 1.96-2.el6 @epel/6.2 To select which variant to install, just use the exact name of the variant you want to install from your whatprovides list: yum install postgis-1.3.6-1.el6.rf.x86_64 For more info, see the ...


5

Back when I first started as a Linux admin 8 years ago I used to use a popular third party repository to upgrade my LAMP stack. It was run by a single individual. One of the primary reasons was developers pressuring me for a newer version of PHP than what came with RHEL 5. It ended up biting me. The person abandoned the repositories so I was no longer ...


5

That's a definitive use case for a proxy. A normal proxy, not a reverse-proxy (aka. load balancers). The most well-known and free and open-source is squid. Luckily it's one of the few good open-source software that can easily be installed with a single apt-get install squid3 and configured with a single file /etc/squid3/squid.conf. We'll go over the good ...


4

Based on and answer by Swoogan On RedHat and CentOS one can do sudo grep -ir PACKAGE_NAME /var/cache/yum/ The results should look something like Binary file /var/cache/yum/REPOSITORY_NAME/primary.xml.gz.sqlite matches Where repository_name is the repository where your package can be found, and it was probably installed from the first one in a list (...


4

Are you sure the packages are signed? I'm not sure, but I guess there should be appropriate signature files. We are signing our whole repositories, so there is only one signature for the whole tree, and we let reprepro do this for us.


4

The answer is not as simple as sticking an RPM with a newer revision in the repo. There are things to be done on the server side and on the client side. Server Side Copy RPM to repo cd /path/to/repo (let's assume /var/www/html/repo) sudo createrepo --update . This will update the repo's database to include the new RPM sudo chmod -R ugo+rX /var/www/html/...


4

I solved it in another way, by installing the ca-certificate. Copy your *.crt file to `/usr/local/share/ca-certificates/ run sudo update-ca-certificates This solution works with Ubuntu 14.04 at least.


4

You can use FAS, Koji, and Bodhi for this. They are a bit complex to set up, but should handle most of what you're looking for.


4

I had to do something very similar for my AWS based setup. I decided to have one box with aptcacher-ng and dpkg-dev package. reprepro doesn't support multiple versions of a package so I didnt use it. Since I wanted to keep these boxes as ephemeral as possible with low setup time I did not use apt-mirroring as it can download lot of data depending what you ...


4

The two repos, remi and mysql56-community, cannot be used together because they are using incompatible package naming schemes. yum info mysql will not show anything from the MySQL community repo because none of the packages is named mysql under the new naming scheme. Try yum info mysql\* instead. Consequently, you cannot update MySQL directly from Remi to ...


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