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1

Set up devices with static addresses manually, or use DHCP. Use the addresses assigned to you. Vodafone's static IP CPE screenshots imply enabling this is hidden under expert settings, "LAN Public", "Multiple Static IP". Also consider implementing IPv6, which sadly is not visible in the Vodafone screenshots I found. Easier to understand ...


2

No, per definition. The Modem is classically NOT PART OF THE IP SPACE. It is a modulator/demodulator working on some lower level transforming a bitstream into a wire level format. Whatever is behind a modem will be assigned the IP address. If the modem also works as router, then it obviously get an IP Address + does NAT (normally) for the home, but it is not ...


1

A modem is a device that convert digital signal to an analog signal. It doesn't have an IP. If you have a xDSL line, on your end, you likely have A modem, converting the analog signal transmitted over the DSL line to something digital (binary data) A router, a device that forward IP packets between your internal network and the provider network. This device ...


1

Keep in mind how the Internet is supposed to work: every desktop and server gets a public, routable, IP address And if you don't want someone connecting to services on your PC, then don't accept packets from subnets you don't want traffic from. The issue, of course, is that some of your services running on the PC might have vulnerabilities (buffer ...


2

I'm not familiar with that particular router, but my guess is that it won't be possible to do what you're asking with it. Enterprise-grade or even small business class firewalls? Absolutely. But consumer-grade routers usually don't offer that much configurability. It may be possible with 3rd party firmware, like DD-WRT, assuming your device is supported. ...


0

ARP is a Layer 2 mechanism. ARP resolves ip addresses to MAC addresses. The volume of ARP traffic on your network is immaterial to whether or not you use your Layer 3 switch as a router or use a "traditional" router. If your servers are all in the same layer 3 network then no routing would be taking place to begin with as the traffic wouldn't be ...


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The answer to this is yes, but depending on speed you need to spend a LOT of money. High end switches basically run a complete operating system and can handle OSPF, BGP and other things. Depending on speed and requirements, though, the client may decide that another rack (in price) is not worth it. And if so, can we statically route to each Server in the ...


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Our server (Windows 2016 - NO DOMAIN) has two NIC. We've named it "Internet" and "Local" to avoid any confusion while configuring RRAS. The "Internet" NIC is connected to the Internet router directly and the "Local" one is connected to our switch. We used different network IP rank on each NIC Internet NIC is on 192.168....


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Port 22 incoming is closed by ISP for security reasons. Figured it out by contacting the ISP. Changed the SSHD port from 22 to 2222: $ sudo vim /etc/ssh/sshd_config $ sudo systemctl restart sshd Now I'm able to SSH to public IP address by using the custom port: >ssh uconn@11.111.11.111 -p 2222


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I have to explicitly enable forwarding on tun1 (incoming traffic): sysctl -w net.ipv4.conf.tun1.forwarding=1 sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1 is not enough (actually it is not needed).


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I made a small schema to make it easier to understand


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