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I'm pretty sure that the reason users inside Network 2 can see the Network 1, but not the other way around is because most SMB routers implement something called NAT (Network Address Translation). Long story made short: NAT is a technology that translates internal addresses - something like 192.168.0.0/24 - to Internet valid ones, like 187.200.145.24/32, and ...


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First, you should disable NAT on you Wifi Access Point. I am not sure if this is possible with NetGear's stock firmware. Second: clients 1 and 2 don't know the route to the 192.168.2.0/24 network, so they send everything to their default gateway (192.168.1.1). If you add a static route to 192.168.2.0/24 on the modem, everything should work. Remark: Clients ...


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Most of the ports you'll find today have something called Auto MDI-X. From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium-dependent_interface: "Auto MDI-X ports on newer network interfaces detect if the connection would require a crossover, and automatically chooses the MDI or MDI-X configuration to properly match the other end of the link." You don't mention the ...


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You technically could use the same address on both interfaces, but the traffic for /24 will only go to the interface with that subnet, since routing follows the longest network prefix. However, if the interface with the /24 is down, traffic for that subnet will go to the /16 interface, where it will die. Best practice is not to have overlapping ranges, ...


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Usually, I wouldn't recommend that kind of approach to solve, and there are a lot of reasons why: networking issues, performance issues, troubleshooting issues, and so on. I would try solving that initially with a DNS name resolution or, if it's just a web application, a reverse proxy inside your network (if that's the case, that could also be solved using ...


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This should do it. The top command works using iptables, which is relatively simple in this case as it is for all traffic between two IPs # iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT -d 192.0.2.1 -j DNAT --to-destination 192.0.2.2 In 'Microtik' format it is: /ip firewall nat add chain=dstnat action=dst-nat src-address=192.0.2.1 dst-address=192.0.2.1 to-addresses=192.0.2.2


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You had an IP conflict: both routers had the same IP. After you changed your modem's IP, you placed it in another network: a netmask of 255.255.255.0 indicates that all devices in the network have the first 3 numbers (or 24 bits) of the address equal. The ARP tables won't detect it, since they have only one entry per IP. You must change the IP of your modem ...


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If your router doesn't support traffic mirroring/monitoring you could do it this way: Get a network a switch that supports traffic mirroring/monitoring or get a network hub and plug it in between the router and the rest of your network. If using a switch you'll need to configure it accordingly for traffic mirroring/monitoring. If using a hub, no ...


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