New answers tagged

0

I made a progress bar for rsync in a wrapper. With --info=progress2 from new versions of rsync no patching is necessary. Usage - replace rsync with rsyncy: rsyncy -a FROM/ TO More info on GitHub, install with pip3 install --user rsyncy


0

I got this error error when the target directory didn't pre-exist. With a source data file: /a/b/c/d/data, rsync -av -e ssh /a/b/c/d/ hostname:/a/b/c/d needs the target directory: hostname:/a/b/c to pre-exist. In reading the man page as a last resort I see that this is the intended behavior.


0

Just use --inplace option: rsync --inplace SRC $remote:DEST Correctly does not change destination ownership (or permissions), regardless of what the source's are. Documentation: --inplace This option changes how rsync transfers a file when the file's data needs to be updated: instead of the default method of creating a new copy of the file and moving it ...


1

Identify the user and group on the remote end. Example user "user1" and group "user1". add "--chown user1:user1" to your rsync command Alternatively if your version of rsync does not support that, on the remote, run "chown -R user1:user1 *" inside the highest folder of your destination file tree and this will ...


1

Try rsync -azvr something somwhere:/location/.


5

rsync is looking at the wrong place, because those paths are relative (from the rsync man page, emphasis mine): --files-from=FILE [..] The filenames that are read from the FILE are all relative to the source dir Either send absolute paths to the files-from option, but do not additionally define a source directory other than the root (/). This should work - ...


2

Please be sure you're not on a hacked machine, a lot of users (me included) have found bitcoin miners hiding behind rsync or other processes. To check: look at users cron jobs: # crontab -l -u alex Delete folders listed in found malicious cron jobs Delete hidden folders in /tmp Delete unknown keys in /home/USER/.ssh/authorized_keys or worse /root/.ssh/...


0

To avoid using root, you could create a dedicated rsync user, say rsync, on both hosts, and add file ACLs to give it read/write permissions: # Primary: make source files readable setfacl -R -m u:rsync:rX,d:u:rsync:rX /etc/letsencrypt /etc/nginx # Replica: make target files writeable setfacl -R -m u:rsync:rwX,d:u:rsync:rwX /etc/letsencrypt /etc/nginx This ...


0

you just need on remote, rsync installed.


0

Excellent question. rsync is really just used for "one way" mirroring. For your scenario, consider the use of Unison (see https://www.cis.upenn.edu/~bcpierce/unison/) which is a 2-way synchronisation tool. It can handle conflicts nicely, but if you only want to sync in one way, take a look at the --force or --prefer options. apt install unison ...


Top 50 recent answers are included