33

As Ryan Ries pointed out, 2147942402 translates to "File not Found" - which is a very appropriate response. Try and press Win+R, put in "move" and press enter - that's the interactive equivalent of what your task is failing to do. The reason is that MOVE is not a program, but a native command in cmd. It should be: Program: "cmd.exe" Arguments: "/c move C:\...


29

Simply configure the Scheduled Task as "Run whether user is logged on or not".


28

Figured out how to do it myself. It's somewhat of a workaround but that's what I expected to get. Alright, first step is to grab a program called AutoLogon.exe from Microsoft: http://technet.microsoft.com/sv-se/sysinternals/bb963905.aspx Stop! Don't cringe just yet. Read on... Run it, set it so that Administrator should log on automatically. Create a task ...


27

The problem isn't really with cron - it's with your job. You will need to have your job interact with a lock of some description. The easiest way to do this is have it attempt to create a directory and if successful continue, if not exit. When your job has finished and exits it should remove the directory ready for the next run. Here's a script to ...


21

If you modify the user file under crontabs, it should work. However, there are two issues to take into consideration: If you mistyped the cron entry in the file, you will not be warned as opposed to using crontab -e command. You can not edit your user file under crontabs directly without login as root or using sudo. You will get permission denied error. ...


21

Use the Invoke-WebRequest cmdlet from Powershell. In your task: Action: Start a program Program/script: powershell.exe Arguments: -Command "Invoke-WebRequest http://myapp/BackgroundTask/Run"


18

I had this same requirement. In Server 2008, you can actually modify the Repeat task every: dropdown. By default the lowest value is "5 minutes", but you can simply type "1 minute" in there. You can verify this by looking at the Triggers tab and seeing that it says "... repeat every 00:01:00...". You can also try typing in "10 seconds" and you'll get an ...


17

C:\> schtasks /delete /tn ContextSwitchTask /f


16

I have a program that is launched on system startup using Task Scheduler on Windows Server 2012. The program must start even if the computer reboots automatially. Then why do you not make it a system service, as the windows specs define? How can I solve this? You can not. Background programs are not supposed to interact with the UI. Or: the UI should ...


15

I have no authoritative reference but I have just tested the behavior of multiple different Stop conditions in Task Scheduler on both Windows 8.1, Server 2008 R2 and 2012 R2. They both apply! Whichever stop condition is met first, stops the task. Per trigger stop condition: The Stop task if it runs longer than-condition specified in the Trigger will only ...


14

You can use the COM-based Task Scheduler Scripting objects: ($TaskScheduler = New-Object -ComObject Schedule.Service).Connect("localhost") $MyTask = $TaskScheduler.GetFolder('\').GetTask("My Task") $MyTask.Enabled = $false To enable the task again: $MyTask.Enabled = $true The above will only work if the shell is elevated and you are a local Administrator ...


13

I asked this same question. Fortunately RyanRies was able to provide a correct answer. In Windows Server 2003 you cannot run a scheduled task as NT AUTHORITY\NetworkService (aka the Network Service account). That capability only was added with Task Scheduler 2.0, which only exists in Windows Vista/Windows Server 2008. Bonus Chatter LocalService Account ...


13

Putting files in cron.d is enough. However, your last entry should be: */10 * * * * php /var/www/site1/helper post:update Otherwise it runs once an hour, at the 10th minute.


13

The shutdown command itself has a delay parameter /t that delays a shutdown for a number of seconds up to 10 years. If you want to schedule a shutdown in 14 hours, say, you might run shutdown /r /t 50400 You might also add a reason with the /d parameter or a comment with /c; run shutdown /? for details.


11

This should work so long as the account you run the scheduled task using has correct access to the network share where the bat file is located. Depending on what the script does, I'd stagger the run times by department. You only need a minute or two of variance to minimize the odds of a staggering hit right at 12. Regarding the commenter above who mentions ...


11

You should not be specifying a user account under which to run the task if you do not want to save the password. Run it as system if that would work or save the user account and password with the task.


10

I found another way that was even easier, for me; it requires more clicking, but less actual thinking. You have to be able to "connect" to your old Windows Server 2003 machine from a Windows Server 2008 machine. On the Win2k8 box, open the Task Scheduler (from the "Administrative Tools" menu, not Server Manager). Click on the "Task Scheduler (Local)" node, ...


10

yes, set your scheduled task to run whether user is logged on or not and is set to run with highest privledges. For the Actions section, set the action to "start a program" with C:\Windows\System32\shutdown.exe and then /r /f /t 5 as the arguments. Make sure the account credentials used for the task have Log on as Batch Job rights.


10

Here's how I've got one of those tasks set up. (Every three hours instead of one, but you should get the gist.) Task runs daily, repeats every x hours for... all day.


10

The answer is that the 64-bit task scheduler will not actually kill a 32-bit task. We solved this by running pskill as action 1 of the scheduled task. pskill has no problem dispatching a 32-bit processes.


10

Proper scheduling of future tasks by local time, taking into account time zones and daylight saving time, is a very complex subject. I've written about it before from a programming perspective on Stack Overflow here and here. I'll summarize from a non-programming perspective: Define your recurrence patterns by local time - not UTC. For example, if you ...


10

The default working directory for a scheduled task running as the Local System account is %Windir%\System32\ Source: I just tested it by making a scheduled task, running as SYSTEM, that executed a batch file. The batch file contained the line ipconfig > test123.txt. When the scheduled task is run, the test123.txt file appears in the Windows\System32 ...


9

I'd personally let the server run or move it to a better running environment. This may not be worth automating. If you must shut down the entire host, please make sure that your VMs have the VMWare tools installed (to allow graceful shutdown and power up) and that they're set to stop and start with the host. You can use the vCli and schedule a cron job to ...


8

I am able to scheduled a task to repeat once per minute with the command line "schtasks". An example of the code is: schtasks /create /sc minute /mo 1 /tn "Task Name" /tr c:\temp\filename.exe The task does display in the Windows 2008 R2 GUI and runs once a minute. The task needs to be created and modified with the command line "schtasks" utility. ...


8

Not the best way but can be a life saver. Tasks are stored in C:\Windows\System32\Tasks in XML format importable using schtasks.exe. As Weasly told, renaming the file doesn't work but Create/Delete will. That said, you need the running user password (that you have) Compared to Weasly's suggestion, it just skips the export phase. create a second task using ...


8

If I understand correctly, you are editing the file manually with a text editor because you don't want to use crontab -e. I'll guess that's because it's using vi as the editor and you are unfamiliar with it. You change crontab -e (and other things that need an editor) to use the more familiar nano editor by running export EDITOR=nano before crontab -e ...


8

I'm assuming that the program needs to display its UI and that you can't just run it non-interactively. (I love these "gems" of software...) Here's what I'd do, personally: Configure the server computer with an AutoAdminLogon as the user you want to run the application as. This will cause the server's console to logon as this user automatically on boot. ...


8

Despite the documentation, the /SD parameter seems to be compatible with the /SC ONCE. The task is successfully created to run on the date provided, at the time provided. (Tested on W8 and W7) Additionally, the XP documentation for schtasks.exe goes so far as to say the /SD parameter is required when using /SC ONCE, so I imagine there are a fair number of ...


8

If you disable a task while it is running it does not stop the current execution, the current process will continue to run until it finishes. Just all next scheduled executions will be disabled. If you run a task manually and don't want it to start again automatically while your manual run is still processing, you can setup the task to apply the rule "do ...


7

I have found the cause of the error is in the C:/Windows/System32/Tasks folder. When the task is created, a XML file is created in the folder. The problem is the security permissions, under properties, on this file does not allow the user you created for the task to have execute permissions. The other issue is when you create the task in the GPO it doesn't ...


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