18

xenpci.sys (EJBPV XenPCI Driver (Checked Build), James Harper) (Checked Build) is a huge red flag. You absolutely should not be using "checked" builds of anything in production. If your hosting company loaded this driver for you, then they absolutely made a mistake. Checked builds include extraneous symbols and extra error checking that aid developers. ...


10

I'll share more widely the great answer given by @n-st: NUL bytes in the syslog are a common effect of a crash that prevented the system from cleanly syncing and unmounting the filesystem. They don't give an indication of what actually triggered the crash. Indeed, I have often seen that behavior after a server crash: those characters are NULL (\0) ...


8

Funny, I just happened to reboot a CentOS 7 system last night, and so I have a nice log of just this to look at. In the case of a crash, obviously nothing is logged between the time of the crash and the system restart. In the case of a reboot, it is pretty obvious, as you get a log of (nearly) everything systemd is doing to shut down the system. One such ...


7

You likely have a hardware problem. This is not an issue with VMware ESXi. Which build number of ESXi are you on? What firmware revision is the server hardware/BIOS on? Is the other ESXi host you mentioned comprised of the same hardware? Your best bet is to examine the HP Integrated Management Log (IML) of the server. You can do this through the ILO 2 ...


7

Xen 3.4.4 is too old. 13 March 2013 Windows 2012 R2 got released on 18 October 2013. To give you an actual comparison, XenServer from Citrix added Windows Server 2012 R2's support in their version 6.2SP1, which was released the 13 December 2013. (http://support.citrix.com/article/CTX139788) See that for the GPLPV's driver; you see only reference to Xen ...


6

If you have crashkernel/kdump installed and enabled, you should be able to examine the crashed kernel with relative easy using the crash utility. For example, presuming that you crashed kernel dumps are saved under /var/crash: crash /var/crash/2009-07-17-10\:36/vmcore /usr/lib/debug/lib/modules/uname -r/vmlinux. Give a look here and here for added details.


6

I had this exact scenario going on. Created a Debian 9 VM under ESXi 6.5 and it would freeze when running a few commands. Also, when I closed an SSH session, it would completely freeze and my only option was to reboot. I fixed it by changing the network adapter type for this host from the default "VMXNET 3" to "E1000e".


6

You're missing some of the error. The full error is: apache2: Syntax error on line 146 of /etc/apache2/apache2.conf: Syntax error on line 2 of /etc/apache2/mods-enabled/lbmethod_byrequests.load: Cannot load /usr/lib/apache2/modules/mod_lbmethod_byrequests.so into server: /usr/lib/apache2/modules/mod_lbmethod_byrequests.so: undefined symbol: ...


5

A little late to the game but if you need to configure kdump for the future: I think the path directive designates a path from the partition or file system designated. By default this is the root FS. If you have a separate partition in /etc/fstab for /var it will obfuscate the crash directory when your system is booted normally. ie if you were to boot ...


5

You should examine/post any errors you've received... Why do you suspect you have a problem? What behaviors have you seen on the system. And you should definitely have multiple NICs available for hypervisor VM traffic to counter this issue. If you suspect the NIC is bad, and it's a standalone device, replace it. If it's on a system board/motherboard, check ...


5

It's probably a backup process or something storage-impacting happening at the host level. This is outside of your control and you should push the VPS provider for a solution. If they can't resolve, consider going elsewhere.


5

I don't particularly like the answer, but it's an answer we got from RH. I'm posting it here in case it helps someone else. One possible way is to grep for rsyslogd in /var/log/messages. A graceful shutdown would have exiting on signal 15. A crash would not. tac /var/log/messages | grep 'rsyslogd.*start\|rsyslogd.*exit' Two consecutive start lines may ...


5

There's more than one way to do this, but I'll cover the 4 best ones I can think of. (EDIT: I published a cleaned-up version of this as a public article on redhat.com. See: How to distinguish between a crash and a graceful reboot in RHEL 7.) (1) auditd logs auditd is amazing. You can see all the different events that it logs by checking ausearch -m. ...


5

A core dump file contains a recording of the memory state of your application/OS/kernel at the time it crashed. The blue screen of death creates a kernel memory dump that can and will contain data relevant to whatever applications were running at the time the crash happened and may indeed contain private data such as clear text passwords, private keys etc. ...


5

You could check the dmesg file at /var/log/dmesg, which is logging the kernel messages. The messages log is just logging service and application messages and if you have a kernel error, the services and applications will just stop running, but the kernel error is still logged in dmesg.


4

That service is probably related to this: http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html You can delete the service by hacking it out of the registry or by running sc delete Service Name from the command prompt


4

After Michael Hampton's comment to the Froggiz' answer, I noticed that Debian seems to lack a coredump.conf manpage, so I've looked for it on the internet and found it. That manpage contains a lot of useful informations and I wonder why Debian ships without it (maybe Debian is shipping without the whole systemd-coredump thing?). However from that manpage ...


3

It could be a hardware issue, but probably more of a firmware thing. Can you ensure that your firmware is up-to-date on the host server? The other thing to do is update your ESXi host. Your build number is: 1623387. The current build number is 2302651. Many people don't understand that VMware actually needs to be patched and updated. The process is not ...


3

By upgrading to at least ESX 5.5 Update 1. Alternately, this is caused by guests with E1000 network adapters, so if updating isn't possible, or not possible immediately, you can always change the vNIC adapter type on the guests. Of course, there is the off chance that this PSOD is caused by something else, but since you haven't posted any error log ...


3

Problem solved by disabling SMP (added "nosmp" parameter in Grub conf). The server is running fine now.


3

A very handy command to find the memory taken by php: ps --no-headers -o "rss,cmd" -C php5-fpm | awk '{ sum+=$1 } END { printf ("%d%s\n", sum/NR/1024,"M") }' Then you divide the RAM you want dedicate to php, and you have your max_children value! Also, you can monitor manually (you must setup the endpoint php-status) or with Nagios.


3

First: DON'T ever use a RAID5, especially not with disks that size. The reason is that it's very likely you end up with an error during a rebuild after a failed disk, which will make the array a total failure. To your questions: one hard drive crash I can replace failed disk with a new similar one and embedded software will rebuild the entire system (...


3

You see this error (MCE, machine check exception) precisely because it has ECC RAM. You have some broken hardware somewhere, most likely a memory stick but possibly one or more processors (CPU 10 perhaps?) or something in between. Invoke your support contract. It can be other bits of the hardware also, but every time I have seen this it has been faulty ...


3

Yes, it's a cause for concern. The server crashed! Check your RAM and your CPU socket pins (if you hand-assembled the server). That's about all the info you'll get. You can open a support case with VMware and they'll analyze the crash dump for you.


3

There are a couple of reasons this could be happening. Firmware. Updates. possibly hardware. Please see: http://meta.serverfault.com/q/6195/13325 If you're running Windows virtual machines configured with Intel e1000 virtual NICs, there is a chance that your VMware host is crashing. That's resolved with updates to ESXi and/or a change in your vNIC ...


3

It's quite unlikely but at the same time, not impossible. As always, a RAID is no substitute for a backup. If you don't have a backup, something like this is guaranteed to happen! Recovery: It's impossible to say since it's not clear what the issue is in the first place. I would say that if rescue systems didn't even see the drives, your chances to do it ...


3

Since I've been at my wits end in a similar situation I thought I'd post what ultimately helped me. It might not be exactly related to your situation, but maybe some other poor soul can stumble upon this and find solace. I have a ZFS backup server that runs rsnapshot (rsync with rotation) across my company's server fleet. Every 2-3 weeks the server would ...


2

You can use '!sym noisy' to turn on verbose symbol loading messages. That should at least show which symbol(s) are not loading properly.


2

This seems to be a due to an unacknowledged manufacturing defect that affects all BackUps models. It appears that the best solution is to pull the battery, if it is still good, and replace the unit. http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/901676-apc-overload-with-no-load/ I am having a similar problem with my BackUps XS 1300. The total load is approximately 350 ...


2

Problem was RAM failures. Ran memtest86 and discovered failures. RMA'ed the DIMMs and got new ones. Some of which also had memory failures. RMAed those as well, now everything is stable.


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