22

If you have multiple VPNs you might run into the issue that when they connect in random order, their interface IDs change. In that case the normal ROUTE -P ADD 10.0.0.0 MASK 255.255.0.0 10.0.0.1 IF 42 does not work. The next time the VPN connects it might have a different interface number. Powershell has a cmdlet available that adds routes on VPN connection ...


16

In general the protocol doesn't have much to do with it. You can have IPSec tunnels in both site-to-site or client (aka road warrior) configurations, just like you can have OpenVPN (TLS) tunnels in both site-to-site or client setups. It's a matter of configuration and purpose, not the protocol used. Site-to-Site VPN typically 1-to-1 configurations both ...


8

We have used tcpdump to examine traffic in and out of the two firewall nodes. I note in passing that tcpdump with {Open,Libre,Strong}S/WAN in a modern kernel can be a bit problematic, because on the interface out of which the encrypted traffic comes and goes one sees the plaintext traffic only when it leaves and not when it arrives. Nevertheless, using ...


6

So I've managed to figure this out after a lot of digging around, I am able to use the native Azure Site-to-Site VPN functionality with OpenSwan which runs on a linux box (Raspberry Pi/Arch Linux) behind my home network's NAT router. Network topology: 192.168.0.0/24 - Home network 192.168.1.0/24 - Azure network 192.168.0.1 - Home router's private IP 192....


6

No, there is no way at this time to connect two Virtual Private Gateways in different regions. I'm sure it's a feature that's coming, given the VPC peering is available for VPCs in a single region. As for "You are responsible for implementing HA solutions for all VPN endpoints (if required)", I discussed in a previous answer there are various techniques for ...


6

I spent some time working on this today, and as far as I can tell, it is not currently possible. While you can get the gateway IP addresses and pre-shared keys synced up, you don't seem to have any control over the IKE parameters for either cloud provider's gateways. AWS wants to use AES-128-CBC, and Azure wants to use AES-256, and that's all she wrote. (...


5

Please have a look at the following: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/vpn-gateway/vpn-gateway-about-vpn-devices According to the documentation, assuming all of your network information is correct, you should disable Perfect Forward Secrecy if you are using static routing.


5

Given the link posted in the comments, I decided to take another look at this openvpn article: https://community.openvpn.net/openvpn/wiki/Gigabit_Networks_Linux I was able to achieve ~150Mbit/s average using a couple of the settings from this article. Here are the steps I took to configure my OpenVPN to achieve this. These are the steps I tried in order: ...


4

netsh interface ipv4 add route [destination/prefixlength] "[interface/connection name]" I'm using that to deal with connections that have subnet overlap by adding static routes for hosts on the remote subnet - servers and the like.


4

Nope, that's not what happened. Assuming you're talking about AD Integrated zones, DNS records are objects in AD. Objects have a USN which is essentially a number that increments whenever a change to that object is made. If your tunnel "blipped" the USN would be incremented on your on-prem DCs and not on your Azure-hosted DC. This means that when it came ...


4

To me it sounds like you are trying to get the site-to-site tunnel gateways to communicate via their internal IP addresses instead of their public IP addresses. In order to do this using a single tunnel you need to configure the left and right internal source addresses. See below... leftsourceip=10.248.248.64 rightsourceip=10.131.250.194 Add those lines ...


4

Yes, UDP over a VPN is possible, but no, that wouldn't change a thing. Although the underlying transport may be reliable, the UDP has been designed not to retransmit lost packets. If you really have a problem with packetloss, either switch to TCP for transport, fix it by making the application send UDP packets slower, or increase the bandwidth on the path (...


4

It depends. As you already know, if the site-to-site VPN drops your office computers will not be able to reach your domain controller: that will mean not only authentication issues, but that almost nothing will work correctly (think DNS, group policies, file/print sharing, etc.). A local domain controller would be a good thing to have, even if your VPN ...


3

This fully depends why and where the packet loss is. Some examples: Your ISP "optimizes" the traffic and downgrades your UDP traffic. In this case a VPN would help unless the ISP downgrades also the VPN traffic. You don't have enough bandwidth to handle the traffic. In this case a VPN would not help.


3

update your azure powershell installation. its a new cmdlet.


3

OP posted the answer on forums.openvpn.net Use this server config: port 1194 proto udp dev tun topology subnet mode server tls-server server 10.8.0.0 255.255.255.0 ifconfig-pool-persist ipp.txt # flexo_client,10.8.0.4 client-config-dir ccd client-to-client #ifconfig 10.8.0.1 255.255.255.0 route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 10.8.0.4 route 192.168.4.0 255....


3

Here is the setting for my sonicwall and pfsense: General tab on Sonicwall: Authentication Method: IKE using Pre shared Secret Name: pfSense Site-to-Site PN IPsec Primary Gateway Name or Address: 1.1.1.1 | IP for pfSense IPsec Secondary Gateway Name or Address: 0.0.0.0 Shared Secret: Shared secret for this connection Local IKE ID: 2.2.2.2 | Select ‘...


3

The VPN is essentially a bridge between the two locations (albeit a secure bridge transiting the public internet). Traffic between the two locations is "tunneled" within the public network between the two locations. As such, the "public" path isn't visible when communicating between hosts on either end of the VPN connection and aren't reflected in your ...


3

Yes you can do this. Evidence? I have an IPSec connection from our office in Albania to our office in Norway. The Albania office is behind CGNAT (the ISP provides only 10. addresses to its customers). The Norway office has a public static IP address. The connection is initiated from the Albania office and configured with keep-alive so that even when the ...


3

Nope. There are no settings for creating metrics and traffic priorities, you're also stuck with Dynamic Routing so all the prioritizing is done in the background. This means that you cannot connect different endpoint to the same range of a local network. it is even stated in "Requirements and considerations" page under the Vnet VPN Documentation. ...


3

Depends on your budget, but I'd pick up a few Cisco ASA 5505 or 5506-x units at ~$550 each. Industry standard, reasonably easy to configure and no babysitting. If you have dynamic IPs at any of the locations, maybe a Cisco Meraki unit with Auto-VPN functionality. Substitute Cisco with Juniper, Sonicwall, whatever. But I don't advocate homebrew ...


3

Is it possible to convert the route based to policy based? No,you could not covert route-based gateway to policy-based gateway. Once a virtual network gateway has been created, you can't change the VPN type. You have to delete the virtual network gateway and create a new one. More information about VPN gateway please refer to this link.


3

If you have any NAT rules configured, like MASQUERADE via --add-masquerade, you have to exclude traffic that matches an IPsec policy from getting natted. Otherwise that traffic will just get natted to the public IP and won't match the IPsec policy anymore and will not go through the tunnel. As described on the strongSwan wiki you need to insert a rule like ...


3

Let me point out the general "hint" what to check based on your description. Hopefully it will help even it is not directly "copy&paste" solution. I am sorry in advance for not going through the configuration you have provided... :-) NAT - source address / interface for this LDAP traffic Usually the NAT is set up against the network so the traffic ...


3

you should always use TLS on the application layer anyway, even on top of client VPN TLS is a protocol that has many different uses. The most common one is in HTTPS but many other protocols use it too as it's a standard way to encrypt network traffix. That's the application level. In AWS Client VPN it's being used one level down - to encrypt the actual ...


3

A site-to-site VPN usually is fully routed network. Meaning there is no NAT or anything. The subnet used for the VPN only needs addresses for the connected routers. So the minimum size of the subnet, that you would need between only two sites is a /30, or possibly a /31. Of course, you might add more sites in the future, so allocating something larger /...


3

In the solution that you've described, after all the configurations that you've mentioned you need to generate the configuration file for that connection using the menu on the top of the page and selecting your customer equipment brand and software version. Then you send that file to your customer so they import it on their VPN concentrador. They are the ...


2

Since the old records reappeared in Windows DNS, one of two things are likely to be happening. It's possible that AD auto-registration put the "old" records back once they were missing. Machines will register all their addresses unless you disable it in the network adapter properties. If not that, you have some kind of strange replication problem. ...


2

Ok, so I beliveve I figured it out. So even though my Openswan box is not behind a NAT, and has a direct NIC with a public IP I had to turn on NAT-Traversal. With this in mind I had to add leftsoureip=172.16.255.1 to tell Openswan what source address to use when communicating with the right side of the Tunnel. The last thing I had to do was to enable ...


2

The behaviour you're seeing is by design. A host on a network will by default use the IP address of the interface where the traffic is exiting as the source IP. A client machine on one of the LANs will use for example 192.168.178.10 as its source IP because it's not multihomed. The gateway will then route the packet to your OpenVPN box and it will pass over ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible