49

Look at the answer section a little more closely: ;; ANSWER SECTION: 444.333.222.111.in-addr.arpa. 86365 IN PTR main.funkeedomain.org.333.222.111.in-addr.arpa. Specifically, the value of the PTR record: main.funkeedomain.org.333.222.111.in-addr.arpa. Your ISP forgot to add the trailing dot to your FQDN. This is causing the DNS software to helpfully ...


33

444.333.222.111.in-addr.arpa. 86365 IN PTR main.funkeedomain.org.333.222.111.in-addr.arpa. Seems that in the reverse DNS zone data somebody forgot to add a trailing period . to your hostname to indicate that it is a fully qualified hostname. In DNS shorthand any simple hostname gets appended with $ORIGIN. The correct zone data would be 444.333.222....


19

You can't get provider independent IPv4 space unless you are buying at least a /24 worth (which will cost you at least $6000) and have your own autonomous system. You don't have your own AS; you aren't big enough. You will need to obtain IP addresses from whoever hosts you, who does have their own AS. You won't be able to take these addresses with you to ...


18

In fact you can set the address and gateway from within the host and configure the container not to touch the interface at all using the keyword manual. Place this within the guests /etc/network/interfaces: auto eth0 iface eth0 inet manual Also leave it up to the container's config file to set up the interface: lxc.network.type = veth lxc.network.flags = ...


11

Go with #3. It's trivial to write a small script you can run that will: Fetch your current public IP Use that IP and awscli to update your security group Stick this script on your desktop and you're two clicks away from updating your SG. Or even better, run it via cron on the hour.


10

Move your servers to a separate VLAN - this will mitigate although there is nothing preventing the user from setting his IP to that of the gateway. Or better, move the problem user to his own VLAN. This can also be solved by using dynamic arp inspection on a good enough managed switch. This can also be solved by treating it as a disciplinary problem that ...


9

A DHCP server must have a configured IP address so that it can know which scopes are locally attached to physical interfaces, and which Scopes can only be served via a DHCP relay. Ignore a management point of view, I am sorry, but I think it is silly to try and hand-wave away and ignore the practical issues about running your network. Getting a valid IP ...


9

Actually, there is a utility named nsupdate that follows the protocol and provide what I was looking for. On Debian and Ubuntu, nsupdate defined as 'nsupdate is the little-known brother of nslookup' You can add and delete 'a', 'aaaa', 'cname' and perhaps other records. It's important to remind that your DNS server need to be 'open' and to accept ...


8

Put your laptop/computer on the same subnet as the currently configured static IP is on. For instance if the current static IP is 10.10.10.1/24 then make your laptop 10.10.10.2/24 and then connect an ethernet cable directly between the laptop and the NAS. Open the NAS management page on your browser and login Go to the Network settings and (recommended) ...


8

In answer to your first question, as Michael Hampton has suggested, you need to be getting a static IP through the IT group. For convenience sake, you should talk to them about getting a DNS record created as well, if possible. A memorable hostname for the server or application will make things easier for the users of the application. In answer to your ...


7

I ended up going with the Ethernet bridging. Lots of extremely verbose examples to wade through online, but it turns out to be pretty easy: First, on A, /etc/network/interfaces was changed from: auto eth0 iface eth0 inet static address 8.8.8.122 netmask 255.255.255.248 gateway 8.8.8.121 to: auto br0 iface br0 inet static address 8.8.8....


7

What am I doing wrong? The backtick ` is the line continuation character, and the first error you get 'missing expression after unary operator' appears to be PowerShell not seeing the -Query line as part of the previous line. Possibly you are missing the ` at the end of the previous line in your copy of the script, or have got it replaced with an ...


7

You don't need PEERDNS since you're using a static IP. This is causing dhclient to run and update your resolv.conf file (as it's designed to do). In the process, it also requests an IP address when it requests the nameservers from DHCP.


7

While the other 2 answers are providing a more secure solution, I would recommend option 2, provided you do not allow to use passwords in SSH, only public key. You also need to make sure that all users with public key loaded know how to secure them and detect if they have inadvertently disclosed their private key. The reason for option 2 is: If this server ...


6

My understanding of DHCP is, a client broadcasts a DHCP Discovery request on the network, and any device on the network can respond. A client can make an unicast DHCP request too, the renewal request is made in unicast, so the client requests directly the DHCP Server. What if the DHCP changed his original IP address ? The renewal will fail and the next ...


6

Your network appears to be a complete mess -- multiple networks using the same IP Subnets is going to confuse the hell out of the Router. Even if you do manage to get the router to somehow co-operate, you're definitely going to confuse anyone else looking at your network. For example, if 10.251.2.11 opens a connection to 192.168.1.5 by sending a TCP SYN ...


6

You can't assign reserved ips to existing VMs or Cloud Services atm. You have to redeploy. Here are the basic steps: Select your VM and go to Dashboard. Take note of the main disk name. Delete the VM with the option to keep vhds. Delete the cloud service Reserve an IP in the same location as your vhds. Example: New-AzureReservedIP – ReservedIPName "...


5

Why not also specify a private network that your host can use to connect to the VM? http://docs.vagrantup.com/v2/networking/private_network.html The private IP will stay the same wherever you go. You could then add a hosts entry for this private IP.


5

You can buy a VPS and then set up a VPN to forward all requests to your machine. But with a VPS it would be probably easier to just put there your website. From another point of view, maybe you can set up a DDNS and host your website on your dynamic IP.


5

Note: this is not the answer you want, but it is the correct answer. The concept of a device with a "default IP address" is fundamentally broken and will cause many issues beyond what you're describing here. In this question, you're trying to solve for the wrong problem. Instead of doing what you suggest, make your devices use DHCP. To learn what IP is ...


5

On a Linux machine you can find the source IP that will be used for a connection with ip route get $destination_ip This is the primary IP of the interface that is directly connected with the next hop.


5

I've finally solved the issue. The breakthrough occured when I followed @john ktejik's directives: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/4390134/failed-to-load-resource-under-chrome/26742627 I came to realize that the involved resource was encompassed within a .jar file. Therefore, I had to tell Apache2 to explicitely use "SetOutputFilter INFLATE;proxy-html;...


5

I had similar problems when running a confluence instance (within a tomcat server) behind apache2 using either mod_jk or mod_proxy. When I tried to view the confluence wiki pages, I received following error messages: Chrome: ERR_CONNECTION_RESET Firefox: The connection was reset The subtle problem was that some of the pages (like the login screen) could ...


5

This... doesn't really make any sense. IP addressing has nothing at all to do with domain membership. If you are replacing a machine with a new one, the new one will not automatically be a domain member just because it has the same IP address (or name) of the old one; you'll need to join it to the domain, using the standard procedure (change the domain ...


5

This is not how EC2 works. All EC2 instances sit behind Amazon's NAT infrastructure. It is not possible to directly assign an EIP or other public IP directly to an EC2 instance.


5

The addresses in fe80::/10 subnet are IPv6 LINK-LOCAL addresses and ARE REQUIRED for correct IPv6 operation (they are for example used for neighbor discovery). You probably cannot remove it and definitely SHOULD NOT remove it if you want to have operational IPv6.


4

To be able to access the device, all you need is an additional IP address in the same network as the device which has a wrong IP. There is no need to directly attach the device to your computer. Example in Linux, where my network is 10.0.0.0/24, on interface wlan1, and the device with a static IP has 192.168.1.1 : Check my newtork interface device name: $...


4

The problem is not external providers refusing your mail, but the fact that you are using iptables to intercept ALL outgoing traffic on port 25 and then redirecting that traffic back to 192.168.1.4:25 which is of course your postfix installation. That is why you are getting the error mail loops back to itself, because it is literally looping back to itself....


4

I'm going to preface this answer (that I already typed out, and am thus, not going to delete) by saying that it looks like your router uses the term "static DHCP" for what the rest of the world calls a "DHCP reservation." So, in fact, the proper configuration of your device is to have your DHCP pool set from 192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.254, and then to put all ...


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