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If you're looking for high-end 10 gig or 100 gig switches, I'd recommend Arista. Their EOS operating system has a Cisco-like CLI, and it includes a very straightforward REST API called eAPI that can be used to perform almost any operation that can be done in the CLI. I spent a lot of time automating configuration over that API. Another possibility is ...


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In case Layer 2 switch the IP is not so important and there are traffic based on MAC address. Until the destination is on the same network segment (for Layer 3 view once it is on the same subnet - e.g. 192.168.0.0/24 - 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.0.254 ) there is utilized ARP protocol (if the MAC of the destination is not known) and then there is communication ...


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A "layer 2 switch" is really a switch, i.e., its only task is to forward network frames from one net branch to the other. But with today's plummeting hardware costs, many devices called "switch" have lots of additional features (like handling VLANs, faking separate networks using the same box -- essentially allowing you to separate the switch into several ...


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tested on debian 10 (after reading this thread and the debian bonding documentation) config is below (no other files edited - modules or something like that) auto enp4s0f2 allow-hotplug enp4s0f2 iface enp4s0f2 inet manual bond-master bond1 bond-mode 4 auto enp4s0f3 allow-hotplug enp4s0f3 iface enp4s0f3 inet manual bond-master bond1 ...


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It feels like a slot for some springy cable retainer like this one: Contacting HP should help.


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HP manuals do not explain this. My answer is based on previous experiences with other devices from Sun/Oracle, Cisco, Juniper, etc. My understanding is those holes are designed for a cable retainer and for whatever reason, HP has not installed a retainer on the final product. Cable retainers come in different forms; most of them include a formed u shape ...


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Removed first line - Overlooked link Schematic A switch is not supposed to access anything but to forward traffic of machines that wants to access a machine within your LAN. In short: a switch is a Layer-2-Relay (See the OSI- or TCP/IP reference model for an explanation of networking layers). I now assume, that you want to be able to access the webserver ...


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You could get a 16 channel smart relay. That should allow you to switch to Ethernet cables between one source. https://www.amazon.com/SainSmart-101-70-103-16-Channel-Relay-Module/dp/B0057OC66U


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