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According to the systemd docs, I'm supposed to use Environment=, but I am unsure of how to do that. Let's say I have a systemd unit file called test-systemd-params.service: This is an example using Environment= Description=Systemd Params Test Wants=network-online.target After=network-online.target [Service] Environment="MOD=foo" "REM=bar&...


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You misread the documentation. Quote: If unit foo.service contains the setting Before=bar.service and both units are being started, bar.service's start-up is delayed until foo.service has finished starting up. After= is the inverse of Before= Highlight by me. This only has an effect if both units are being started. If you disable one of them, it has no ...


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I'm not still familiar with systemd but as far as I know PATH environment ain't yet available on boot-up thus some scripts and program set the PATH environment firsts. Assuming your service runs whenever you run it on console, this would be always the case.


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I looks like you forgot to enable the timer. systemctl start <unit> starts that timer right now (ie when you first install it and want it to run). systemctl enable <unit> doesn't start the unit now but sets up the relevant hooks so the unit is started based on what is in the unit file... e.g. timer will start after reboot because of... [Install] ...


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This log come from cron task of ubuntu-advantage-tools see Ubuntu Advantage. Just remove the package: sudo apt remove ubuntu-advantage-tools


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I found out what was happening. The App needed more time to start, but systemd was always killing it before it had time to start and notify. It only happens when booting because the App takes more time to start when the system is booting. So I needed to add a larger TimeoutSec, then it worked fine.


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As your use-case is pretty custom and your needs might change a in the future, why don't you do something like the following... create a new systemd timer (e.g. failover-manager) on both machines that runs once per minute. The systemd timer will start an associated one-shot systemd service at regular intervals. That one-shot systemd service can just run a ...


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I had a similar problem when using Podman. In dmesg, I saw [265142.704655] cgroup: fork rejected by pids controller in /machine.slice/libpod-89834734bc5ab227ef20902dbe60d6082dd95dad81c2a3dd860392316bd58dbb.scope When investigating, it turned out that podman sets default task limit to 2048 on my system # systemctl status libpod-...


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I have problems with Error of nfs server daemon fails on booting process. I don't know exactly why, but the problem was from LVM. Before the reboot I remove my LV, VG and PV. I make the mount permanent by adding them to /etc/fstab. After removing my PVs reference from /etc/fstab my problem solved.


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For those wondering how to solve this with the kernel commandline: # echo 'GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=systemd.unified_cgroup_hierarchy=false' > /etc/default/grub.d/cgroup.cfg # update-grub This creates a "hybrid" cgroup setup, which makes the host cgroup v1 available again for the container's systemd. https://github.com/systemd/systemd/issues/13477#...


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It may also be the case you/someone/ntp changed the time backwards. It turns out that journalctl -f shows the latests logs based on date, not based on latest incoming logs... Check out: https://github.com/systemd/systemd/issues/5345


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ended up using rsyslog with the omjournal output log. This way the logs go to journald and are "unified" in the syslog ecosystem. Have the advantage of working across containers too. # /etc/rsyslog.conf ... module(load="omjournal") template(name="journal" type="list") { constant(value="remote" outname="...


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confirmed systemctl daemon-reload followed by networkctl reload works on 249 i can see the changes on journalctl -xeu systemd-networkd it will only reload/re-apply changes in .network and .netdev file. And not for .link etc.


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No, only building and upgrading one binary of systemd is not supportable. As in, people you might ask for help will have difficulty reproducing what you are doing. resolved, like the dozes of binaries that compose this thing, links to some systemd shared code. This is not likely to remain binary compatible across an arbitrary number of releases. It might ...


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This worked for me: systemctl [--user] show [unit name] --property=NeedDaemonReload or systemctl [--user] show [unit name] | grep NeedDaemonReload= It will output "NeedDaemonReload=yes" if it need to be reloaded. If you use the grep method you can change the last part to grep NeedDaemonReload=yes or grep NeedDaemonReload=no to make it output ...


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