16

This has been solved. I began to examine the registry because increasing CPU and RAM resources on the virtual machine did not resolve the issue. I was pointed to Microsoft's dureg tool to estimate the registry's size. Browsing via regedit, I encountered issues opening the keys under HKEY_USERS\.Default\PRINTERS. Using dureg, I started probing under that ...


9

Just change the Color depth of the remote session to 24bit or less. ( You can find "color depth" setting on Display tab of the Remote Desktop Connection properties) good luck.


8

Automatically logging everyone off at a set time is a bad idea - what happens when that super important project is due in the morning and everyone is burning the midnight oil? What you can, and should, do is set it to log off disconnected sessions after a set amount of time. On my terminal server, that's set to 2 hours - so it won't end their session when ...


7

What worked for me to resolve this same issue was to kill off all the processes running under the locked account from under Task Manager and then I was able to simply log off that account (from an Administrator account). The user was then able to log back on under the account. No reboot was necessary and no third party software needed to be downloaded.


6

You can use a script to collect this information. Not as ideal/simple, but it will get the job done. Here is a Powershell script that should work on Windows 7/Server 2008r2 or higher (this code can be further cleaned up on newer Powershell versions, but I have kept it as-is for backwards compatibility): $LogName = 'Microsoft-Windows-TerminalServices-...


6

Neither is 'Correct' per-say, but RDP-ing, is less incorrect. FTP-ing, SCP-ing, The Protocol is used in slang more frequently and if you wanted to be consistent I would stick with that. And if you consult the oracle


5

Based on the above answers, you can create a shortcut to the following location (right click on Desktop>New>Shortcut) explorer shell:::{2559a1f2-21d7-11d4-bdaf-00c04f60b9f0} It should also work if launched from command line (if you want to script it). Add a nice icon from %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\imageres.dll, and you're good to go. Thanks guys!


5

The simple answer is to run an elevated command prompt and type "Taskmgr" and then it will allow you to logoff the sessions under the USERS tab. It will not work without being in the elevated session.


5

The RDP GDI Acceleration Extensions document is the closest thing I can find to an official reference, and it makes references to 16-bit RGB values being sent across the wire for things like GDI brushes as being 5/6/5 format (5 bits of red, 6 bits of green, 5 bits of blue). 5/6/5 has always been how Windows has handled 16-bit video modes (at least, in my ...


5

That command outputs a list of usernames on the system. cut is a command used to process text according to columns. -d: tells the command that columns are delimited by the : character. -f1 tells the command to display only the first field. /etc/passwd is the file it is to read data from. The /etc/passwd file contains a line for each user. Each line has ...


5

Generally, if you have to ask then, yes, you need permission. Just because no one is currently logged in to a server doesn't mean the server isn't running a dependency for something more important or there is a cron/scheduled task that is critical to operations. Does this company have a change control and incident management process defined? If they do you ...


4

I always change it via On-Screen Keyboard. Type OSK and launch the virtual keyboard. Press CTRL + ALT and click on END with the mouse. This will invoke a security screen, where you can change the password.


4

Had same issue and I've found that my user was in Deny log on through Remote Desktop Services policy (in Security Settings > Local Policies > User Rights Assignment). After I removed him from this policy I was able to log on successfully.


4

I have a C# program that does exactly this. I had an issue on Server 2008 R2 where the event log didn't always list the IP addresses of the user (if they connected from the newer Remote Desktop clients). Some services implement their own credential check provider that doesn't provide all of the information you would want. http://cyberarms.net/security-...


4

In secpol.msc open Local Policies | Security Options set Network security: Restrict NTLM: Incoming NTLM traffic to Deny all accounts. This cannot be used with NLA but works with SSL (the SSL info icon on the topbar of mstsc.exe client confirms server identity) and sucessfully records source network address in failed Event ID 4625 in the audit log. Here is ...


4

I'm not sure what you mean by "force the logoff of that user via GUI" so you might be referring to this, but I'll throw it out there anyway: My GUI method is to open Task Manager on the server, go to the Users tab, then right click the user's session and choose Log Off. If that fails to actually log off the session or their session isn't listed there, then ...


4

How many of you have ever dealt with an issue where you just knew that something was wrong with your print spooler but could not quite put a finger on it? Maybe print jobs were slow, certain users could print to some printers but not others, or maybe nobody could print at all? - Blake Morrison - Ask Performance Blog - Microsoft Fixit for Printing ...


4

According to Microsoft this is not a bug but rather a feature introduced with the changes to the Remote Connection Manager (RCM) in Windows Server 2016. Quoting https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/3200967/changes-to-remote-connection-manager-in-windows-server-2016: Starting in Windows Server 2016, RCM no longer queries the user’s object in AD DS. ...


4

That is a Computer setting, not a User setting. You can't filter it based on the user. It applies to all users logging onto that RDS server.


4

It sounds like your user is missing the skeleton files, the default .bashrc, .bash_profile etc. which are normally copied into a user's home directory from /etc/skel when a user is created. You can copy these files yourself if they are missing or corrupted.


3

I had the same issue in Windows Server 2016. The user was not able to login. So I tried the following steps to disconnect the orphaned session: on the CLI qwinsta lists all available sessions, inactive and active ones, there is one disconnected session (called "getr." in the screenshot) without a user name, but an session id. show active sessions and ...


3

In Windows Server 2003 that error was a result of kernel memory exhaustion. Because you're dealing with Windows Server 2008 R2 I'm not sure how closely related the cause of the problem is to the cause in W2K3, but I would bet that it is a memory issue due to the number of users and processes. I would take a look at Nonpaged Pool memory exhaustion as the ...


3

Would it be possible to run a domain controller on a Hyper-V instance on the Terminal Server? Yes, but the better approach would probably be to set this physical machine up as a Hyper-V host, and run both the terminal server and the domain controller off of it. But, so long as you configure the Hyper-V networking properly, you can install Hyper-V on your ...


3

Windows already stores "password verifiers," more commonly known as "cached credentials," of users when they log on to the machine. By default it will store something like 10 of them, meaning that the eleventh user to log on will overwrite the cached credentials of the 1st person who logged on, and so forth. This number is easily changed with either Group ...


3

Your terminology like "using LDAP to log in" makes me think that you're not really very familiar with Windows Server. I think you'd do well to look at hiring an outside consultant to help you get this put together. Active Directory Group Policy can do what you're looking for in a fairly simple manner. You'd create Organizational Units (OUs) to house the ...


3

It doesn't sound like the application is meant to run in a multi-user environment (evidenced by the fact that it's storing configuration settings in Program Data), my suggestion would be to install the printer on the Terminal Server and have your users select the printer that is locally installed on the Terminal Services server.


3

In case it helped, will write an answer with what we talked. Please check Performance issues due to Inactive Terminal Server Ports There are several issues that have been associated with a high number of inactive Terminal Server ports. Delayed logon times to RDP sessions, failure of printers to redirect, and slow server performance due to registry ...


3

I assume you are referring to Azure RemoteApp which is an RDP service in azure as opposed to your own VM running terminal services. The only advantage you'll get by having RD RemoteApp in different data centres is the slightly better connectivity to the local Azure data centre. Azure RemoteApp is resilient by itself, so my advice start in the data centre ...


3

No, there is not a connection limit based on the number of User CALs. User CALs have traditionally not been enforced. Also, the license requirements do not factor in concurrency. A User CAL is required for every person that logs on. Microsoft isn't interested in every user that has ever logged on, but they do count users that have logged on in the last ...


3

Open gpedit.msc, then go to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Remote Desktop Services > Remote Desktop Session Host > Connections. Double click the Limit number of connections and set the RD Maximum Connections allowed to 1. Make sure the Restrict Remote Desktop Services user to a single Remote ...


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