3

I'm currently running cloned CentOS Xen images, and only changing mac addresses and server keys between them. IPs and Macs are the only things that would cause networking issues. The other thing to worry about is mountpoints - if you are mounting e.g. /var/www off shared storage, you (perhaps) want to make sure that all the cloned servers are each mounting ...


3

I have cloned Oracle databases for two purposes. To the best of my knowledge only one of these will meet your requirement. I have cloned database to provide an additional instance (sometimes read-only) for another environment or use. In this case I change the database name. These clones can be detected by checking the database name. I have cloned the ...


2

@sysadmin1138's answer is a little misleading. uSNCreated is not related to time; it is unique only on the DC. It is the DC's "highestCommittedUsn + 1" at the time of object creation. He is probably mixing it up with whenCreated, which is a 64-bit number representing the number of 100 nanosecond intervals since 12:00 am January 1, 1601...and also not ...


2

You need to do two things: Load the unique_id_module. This provides the UNIQUE_ID environment variable which serves this purpose. LoadModule mod_unique_id.c Copy the UNIQUE_ID into the X-Request-ID header in the appropriate virtual host using the RequestHeader directive. RequestHeader setifempty X-Request-ID %{UNIQUE_ID}e ProxyPass ... ProxyPassReverse .....


1

My take on it is this: if it is made of bits, it can be cloned in a way that you will never be able to tell the difference between the original and the clone. Your only chance would be if there was some sort of a calculated value that each database instance returns, so - Each database instance returns a different value. The value returned by each database ...


1

As Hennes notes above, a MAC address is a 48-bit number; an IPv4 address is a 32-bit number. Let's not think about IPv6 yet. Amazon.com says that the stock paperback Merriam-Webster dictionary contains "over 60,000 words", which is about 16 bits of space. That means that you can do this mapping yourself, by getting a list of 65,536 English (or your ...


1

I think both the links pretty much cover everything. Just one thing missing, fixing the disk UUID just incase. Following are the steps to resolve your disk UUID issue Run 'blkid' to get the new disk UUID /dev/sda1: UUID="5057334e-065e-40e2-9da0-16a282fbb0de" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sda2: UUID="bb5141fc-c43c-400a-bd3e-6e90483c8cd1" TYPE="ext4" Update your /etc/...


1

I recently made some code that identified the computers using our software by drive serial number. Out of about 11 stores that I gave the new code to, 3 of them had hard drives with duplicate serial numbers. It appears that hard drive serial numbers are not very consistently unique. Apparently, I'm going to have to find another means of uniquely identifying ...


1

Amazing as it sounds, I recently purchased a batch of ASUS Notebooks - every one had the same hard disk serial number (which I use to secure my software) Consequently, no security any more (based on disk serial number) I am looking for an alternative method of securing my software to a specific computer Remember the old days when software was sold with a '...


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