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227

To remove java 1.7 and install java 1.8: sudo yum install java-1.8.0 sudo yum remove java-1.7.0-openjdk


153

Using -f with ln will overwrite any link that was already there, so as long as you have the correct permissions, it should work... It's always worked for me. What operating system are you using?


146

Install Java Runtime 1.8 sudo yum install java-1.8.0 or if you need a java compiler and other developer tools: sudo yum install java-1.8.0-openjdk-devel Then use the alternatives command to make Java 1.8 the default. sudo /usr/sbin/alternatives --config java sudo /usr/sbin/alternatives --config javac # etc If you prefer you can remove Java 1.7 with ...


121

Ok, I found where my error is: one should not put the first / in path. In other words, the commands in my questions should be: Creation -> ln -s {path/to/file-name} {link-name} Update -> ln -sfn {path/to/file-name} {link-name} instead of Creation -> ln -s {/path/to/file-name} {link-name} Update -> ln -sfn {/path/to/file-name} {link-name} ...


55

From what I understand, this error is generated from the priorities plugin as noted by Pawel. In 2009, the maintainer of yum mentioned that he hoped people would not use priorities. To disable the priorities plugin, edit /etc/yum/pluginconf.d/priorities.conf and set enabled = 0. After this change, next time you run yum update, you should not get any ...


40

Some packages are held by more than one repository. The priorities plugin choose packages from the highest-priority repository, excluding duplicate entries from other repos.


34

https://access.redhat.com/discussions/3106621#comment-1196821 Don't forget that you might need to reboot because of core library updates, at least if it is glibc. (And also, services may need to be restarted after updates). If you install the yum-utils package, you can use a command called needs-restarting. You can use it both for checking if a ...


31

In case you want to know which packages are excluded due to priority protections you can use yum list updates -d3


30

About comparing installed kernels with running one: #!/bin/bash LAST_KERNEL=$(rpm -q --last kernel | perl -pe 's/^kernel-(\S+).*/$1/' | head -1) CURRENT_KERNEL=$(uname -r) test $LAST_KERNEL = $CURRENT_KERNEL || echo REBOOT Hope that helps!


30

There is an important distinction between making a service highly available and making an individual machine highly available. In most cases the goal is to make the service highly available, and availability of individual machines is only a means toward achieving that goal. However there is a limit in how far towards the goal you can get by improving ...


18

If you are starting from a bare metal install, you can slipstream updates into your installer disc so it already has updates in it (this depends on how many installs you're doing to make it worth it). WSUS will not reboot your computer for you. It only keeps track of your updates and will act as a repo for updates so that rather than updating 300+ meg of ...


18

The yum history option allows the user to view what has happened in past transactions. To make it more simple you can grep Update from yum history # yum history Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, refresh-packagekit ID | Login user | Date and time | Action(s) | Altered ----------------------------------------------------------...


17

The simplest answer is, in this case, the correct answer: You will no longer be able to get firmware updates for HP equipment which is not (a) under its original factory warranty, or (b) covered by an active support contract with HP. This has a number of implications, chief among them: As a sysadmin you will have to ensure that you have an HP support ...


17

Not sure if this is considered as abandoned question - stumbled upon this while troubleshooting my issue and now adding my solution now that it's resolved. To update service with new container, you need to: upload new container to repository; trigger task definition update; trigger container update; important: make sure service rules allow launching new ...


16

I've done this many times with Flash Player (and other software). What you want to do is: Use ORCA to edit it with any customization that you want and save it as a transforms (or save it as a whole new MSI, whatever works for you). Put that new MSI (and transforms) on your software deployment share. Add this software (and transforms) to your existing policy....


14

Simply: apt-get update will update your local copies of your repositories' package data, such as available versions and dependencies. This is needed to check whether any updates are present. It doesn't actually upgrade packages. apt-get upgrade and apt-get dist-upgrade will upgrade packages. The former runs general system upgrades The latter will apply ...


14

The root cause of this issue is that Red Hat broke binary compatibility of their OpenSSL packages between 6.4 and 6.5, something that they promised that they would not do. Resolving this problem is straightforward, but depending on the applications you may have deployed, may take some yelling at your application vendors. Be sure to reserve most of your ire ...


12

First issue: Quoting you: Creations and deletions work fine. But updates do not work. After performing this command, the symlink becomes invalid. The problem With the given directory structure: ~/scripts/test/ ~/scripts/test/remote_loc/ ~/scripts/test/remote_loc/site1/ ~/scripts/test/remote_loc/site1/stuff1.txt ~/scripts/test/remote_loc/site2/...


12

To your question, "Are there Linux distributions/processes where upgrades/patches never require reboots?", I'm not aware of any, and I'm highly doubtful that there ever will be any which are truly reboot-free. In addition to Michael Hampton's comment about why live patching is not an out-of-the-box experience anywhere, live patching also doesn't achieve the ...


11

If you know how to fix the source of problem (for example: change application settings in Beanstalk Environment variables or deploy fixed version of your application), then: Go to page Auto Scaling Group, choose your region, find Auto Scaling Group by Beanstalk Environment ID (like e-abcd12345). In Details tab, push "edit", set Desired, Min and Max to 0. ...


10

Debian patterns for Puppet. Are configuration management tools (Puppet, Chef) capable of keeping installed packages up to date? Wikipedia's blog entry and link to their repository (all the configs except the passwords).


10

You can use the exec type such as: exec { "upgrade_packages": command => "apt-get upgrade -q=2", path => "/usr/local/bin/:/bin/:/usr/bin/", # path => [ "/usr/local/bin/", "/bin/" ], # alternative syntax } To be honest, I did not try it myself, but I think you just need to create a new module that include such an exec definition. ...


10

One method is to update the system via the command line. Grab the lastest package from here. As of today, that is ESXi500-201205001. Transfering the update zip file to a datastore on that is visible to the host. Use commands like the following to apply the update. # check server status vicfg-hostops --server servername --username root --operation info #...


10

You should never touch anything in production unless there's a good reason to do so. Security updates are a very good reason. And as Iain mentions, testing beforehand helps you to ensure that nothing is likely to go wrong when you apply the updates to your production system.


10

From command prompt: "C:\Program Files\Common Files\microsoft shared\ClickToRun\OfficeC2RClient.exe" /update user This should trigger the Update GUI. You can also do this silently by adding displaylevel=false forceappshutdown=true: "C:\Program Files\Common Files\microsoft shared\ClickToRun\OfficeC2RClient.exe" /update user displaylevel=false ...


9

This is done with yum-cron. It includes a cron job at /etc/cron.daily/yum.cron which only runs if the yum service (CentOS 5 'extras' repo) or yum-cron service (CentOS 6 'base' repo) is activated: CentOS 5: # yum install yum-cron # chkconfig --level 345 yum on # service yum start CentOS 6: # yum install yum-cron # chkconfig --level 345 yum-cron on # ...


9

Generally, yes this is safe. For critical packages, though (Postgres, Nginx, etc.), I'd recommend pinning those packages to a specific version so that they do not get updated. When Postgres gets updated, for instance, it will restart the database server, which is something you want to be able to schedule around planned downtime. That said, it's always best ...


9

Oracle's pretty hostile, and wants more money from the Sun tech they spent so much on - security for end users (who can't afford $10k for basic updates) be damned. You're almost certainly looking at a large bill if you go the paid support route to get the JRE 6 updates - I'm not seeing anything you're missing that would be any cheaper. Ideas: What OS is ...


9

The short answer: Go to System Preferences > Security & Privacy and give Full Disk Access to Terminal. The long answer: Pull down the Apple menu and choose ‘System Preferences’ Choose “Security & Privacy” control panel Now select the “Privacy” tab, then from the left-side menu select “Full Disk Access” Click the lock icon in the lower left ...


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